Essential Reads

Forgetting Apple’s Logo: Why We Forget What We Often See

Things we see constantly can be easily forgotten because we see them so often.

Midlife: Adult's Prime

Why middle age truly is the prime of life

Our Top-Down Brains and How They Help Us Adapt to the World

What the gold-white, blue-black dress debate reveals about how our brains work

Why We Hate It When People Invade Our Space

John Travolta and Joe Biden put it in the news, but it's an everyday problem.

Recent Posts on Memory

Dogs Don't Remember Yesterday, Claims Psychologist

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in Animal Emotions
Ample data show dogs and many other animals are not "stuck in an eternal present"—they remember the past and plan for the future. From an evolutionary point of view, it would be somewhat odd and exceptional if other animals didn't "remember yesterday" and plan accordingly.

Can You Capture What You Love?

When you become passionate about something, or someone, you want to hold onto it, attach yourself to it, possess it. Fascinated or enchanted, you experience a high, your spirits soar. So naturally you desire to have the object of your attraction close by, to make it your own—and permanently. So what’s the problem with this? Unfortunately, just about everything...

What's Your Meditation Type? (+ 5 Best Meditation Apps)

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in Feeling It
Scientists and the popular press have touted the benefit of meditation. Here's how to find the type that's right for you.

The Cerebellum Holds Many Clues for Creating Humanoid Robots

Recent discoveries show that the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") holds vital clues for the future creation of sentient robots and androids that are featured in upcoming blockbuster movies like Chappie, Ex Machina, and Avengers: Age of Ultron.

Critical Thinking Puzzles

By Marcel Danesi Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in Brain Workout
Critical thinking puzzles are designed to stimulate the logical areas of the rain.

Dinner for the Dying: Last Suppers

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on March 04, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
Art exhibit in Dayton features paintings of inmates' final meals; artist Julie Green describes her process.

Let's Honor Leonard Nimoy and End Smoking in Rehab

By Jason Powers M.D. on March 04, 2015 in Beyond Abstinence
Leonard Nimoy, an icon to millions of Trekkies as Mr. Spock, the half-Vulcan, half-human first officer of the Enterprise, fell victim to the most human of all diseases: addiction.

Psychology Poems for the Month of March

Listen first, hear a blur… Get clues, listen twice, words are heard! Top-down: it filters.

Mourning – Death, Loss, Trauma, and Psychotherapy

Mourning is the process by which we heal from grief. I’ve heard people say, “What’s the point of grieving, you can’t bring a loved one back from the dead.” That of course, is true, but it is what allows us, the survivors, to return back to the land of the living and resume our lives.

Adolescents Are Prone to Love Addiction

If someone falls in love and believes her love may be requited, parts of her brain take on the chemistry of a brain on cocaine.

Forgetting Apple’s Logo: Why We Forget What We Often See

Where was the last fire extinguisher you saw? Do you remember where the “B” key is on your keyboard? Even things we see and interact with constantly can be forgotten—sometimes because we see them so much.

Letting Go of Self-Destructive Behaviors

By The Book Brigade on March 03, 2015 in The Author Speaks
The millions of teens and adults who engage in self-destructive behavior do so because they never learned more constructive ways of soothing themselves in moments of distress. Many have engaged in such behaviors for so long that they can't envision a way out. But it's possible to replace self-destructive acts with kinder means of coping.

On Grief

The distinction between physical ‘pain’ and ‘psychological ‘grief’

A Visit to the Psychiatric Hospital Made Me Sick

By Noam Shpancer Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Insight Therapy
Our psychiatric inpatient care system is insufficient and often detructive. But the inpatient population is not a wealthy, vocal, or well-organized pressure group. In our current cultural moment, without a strong voice in the Halls of Power, you may well end up wandering aimlessly down the corridors of an ill-staffed and ill-equipped hospital ward, talking to yourself.

The First Myth About Positive Emotions

By Todd B Kashdan Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Curious?
Learn about one of the big myths about positive emotions. Don't make the same mistakes that the majority of authors, journalists, and scientists are making.

Use Checklists More

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 02, 2015 in How To Do Life
Why checklists are so helpful and how to create a critical one.

Drawing From Moments of Serenity

By Hal Mathew on March 02, 2015 in Unagoraphobic
Learning a new skill will give you meditative, calming periods of time each day

The Brain Is Not an Octopus

By Susan Greenfield Ph.D. on March 02, 2015 in Mind Change
Engaging in several tasks at once might seem like a wonderful solution for keeping pace with the speed of twenty-first-century life, but the price paid could be high.

The Color Yellow

By Greg O'Brien on March 02, 2015 in On Pluto
Yellow is also a color of angels, and in scripture it symbolizes a change for the better. My mom, who died of Alzheimer’s in a bruising battle with the disease, believed in angels. So do I, in the wake of my own diagnosis five years ago of Early Onset Alzheimer’s. Yellow—derived from the ancient Latin “Angelus,” translated “messenger” or “envoys”— resonates with peace.

The Borderline Mother II

A borderline mother can you hurt a child (even an adult child) in the blink of an eye. Here's what happens and how you can respond.

5 Things Everyone Should Know About Resilience

By Peg Streep on March 02, 2015 in Tech Support
When we speak of someone being "resilient," we tend to think of it as a character strength. But what is resilience anyway, and what does it take to weather the setbacks in life? A look at the research reveals much...

Midlife: Adult's Prime

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 02, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Why middle age truly is the prime of life.

Blank Spaces of Memory

By Bruce Poulsen Ph.D. on March 01, 2015 in Reality Play
Memory’s underpinnings have long been explored by artists and writers—from Klimt to Proust. Some contemporary works also deserve our attention.

Treatment for Borderline Disorder May Reduce Distortions

By Randi Kreger on March 01, 2015 in Stop Walking on Eggshells
My teenage sister was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. We have a difficult relationship, and sometimes I feel like interacting with her is just not worth the trouble. For example, I have caught her lying on too many occasions to count, and she always makes excuses. Now, she blames it on her psychological problems. Can lying be treated?

Could You Be Addicted to Your Cell Phone?

Could you go 24 hours without your cell phone? Many people can't!

Fear and Pain Can Alter Memory

What we experience today can impact our memories of similar events that happened yesterday. Our present-moment experience is so powerful it may reinforce or ‘overwrite’ our memory of a past experience.

Why You Can't (and Shouldn't) Be Happy Most of the Time

By Frank T McAndrew Ph.D. on March 01, 2015 in Out of the Ooze
We work very hard to reach goals, anticipating the happiness that they will bring us. After a brief fix of “yippee," however, we quickly slide back to our sorry-ass, humdrum, ordinary state of being. Studies of lottery winners and others who seem to "have it all" throw cold water on our dream of a different life. And yet, we persist. Why?

Why You Should be More Grateful

By Neel Burton M.D. on March 01, 2015 in Hide and Seek
Despite its many benefits, gratitude is hard to cultivate.

The Effect of Napping on Toddlers’ Nighttime Sleep

By Dennis Rosen M.D. on March 01, 2015 in Sleeping Angels
A recent review of 26 different studies on how napping during the day effect the sleep of toddlers at night found that there is, indeed, a connection between the two.

One Man’s Sorrow, Enlightened by Grief

By Nancy Berns Ph.D. on February 28, 2015 in Freedom to Grieve
Paul said he was surprised by his grief: “I don't think that I had any inkling that I had any depth or capacity for that much grief. It just took me by surprise.”