Essential Reads

Treasuring Memories Through Memoirs, Stories, or Videos

By Rita Watson MPH on November 26, 2016 in With Love and Gratitude
With holidays approaching, begin to think about treasuring family memories.

A Coffee Maker or a Time Machine?

Recent studies on memory explain why spontaneous involuntary memories of our past are more vivid and emotionally intense than the memories we access intentionally.

Love, Death and the Internet

By Jeanne Safer Ph.D. on November 14, 2016 in The Last Taboos
Finding old flames online can change your memories.

How Not to Believe

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on November 13, 2016 in One Among Many
The Mandela effect says that if many (how many?) ‘remember’ that the great man died in prison, then it was so, if only in a parallel universe. I consider this dangerous nonsense.

More Posts on Memory

What is Psychology’s Single Most Brilliant Discovery?

What is the most profoundly important thing we've learned from 150 years of scientific psychology? Here is one nomination.

How Habits Can Affect Our Memory

Can our habits actually allow our memory to atrophy?

This Type of Exercise Changes Your Brain—for the Better!

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on November 30, 2016 in Cravings
If you're losing gray matter and your memory is starting to fade, this exercise can help.

Recovering From PTSD With the Right Help

By Eric Newhouse on November 29, 2016 in Invisible Wounds
I personally know the exhilaration of sitting atop a mountain peak in Montana. Building positive memories like this are important in overriding the memories of trauma.
K. Ramsland

Boys Dressed as Girls Who Became Serial Killers

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on November 29, 2016 in Shadow Boxing
Some serial killers recall being dressed as girls when young, despite being male. It might have had a negative impact.

Test Anxiety? Want to Get Better Grades? Take More Tests.

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on November 25, 2016 in Cravings
Do you or your children suffer from test anxiety? One study technique appears to help more than others.

Dogs Remember More Than You Think

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on November 24, 2016 in Animal Emotions
A new study shows dogs display episodic memory and remember far more than we give them credit for. While many people already "knew" this, it's nice to have the science back us up.

To Remember Multiple Items: Put Them in Related Groups

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on November 23, 2016 in Memory Medic
Here's another tip for better memory.

United States of America (1776-2016): Do We Need A Memorial

By Harriet F. Senie Ph.D. on November 21, 2016 in The Mind Through Art
If this is the end of the USA as we know it, how should we commemorate our loss?

5 Verbal Red Flags That Signal Deception

When you're having important conversations, here's how to be mindful of potential deception.
Pinterest Gretchen Rubin

The Smell of a Hallway Taught Me Something Important

By Gretchen Rubin on November 14, 2016 in The Happiness Project
For some reason, this hallway smelled exactly like the hospital where I worked as a candy-striper in high school.

Specific Ways to Improve Your Memory

Do you think your memory has declined over time? Perhaps there are concrete things you can do to improve it.

The Ethics of Trading Brains

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on November 11, 2016 in How To Do Life
The first head transplant is planned. What are the implications?

Memory for Chaos

A hallmark of experts is that they recall domain-specific meaningful material better than non-experts. A new study shows that this superiority extends to meaningless material.
Gaelle Marcel/Unsplash

10 Pop-Science Books to Challenge Your Views on Expertise

Want to know the secret to becoming an expert? 10 of the best page-turners mapping out the road to mastery.

A Trump Effect for Sexual Harassment and Assault Memories

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on October 28, 2016 in Mental Mishaps
Memories can hide and wait. The election has provided a moment for sexual harassment and assault memories to return to awareness and become part of a national conversation.

4 Possible Explanations for Déjà Vu

We still don't know that much about déjà vu. Here are 4 possible explanations for this phenomenon.

What Dogs Do After Training Affects How Much They Remember

Data shows that adding a play session after training can improve a dogs memory and performance by 40%.

Class Reunion

By Susan Hooper on October 24, 2016 in Detours and Tangents
For decades, I shuddered at the memory of my high school years. Attending my high school reunion helped me put those memories in a new context.

Art Therapy: Treating Combat-Related PTSD

Recent research underscores that art therapy's role in the resolution of trauma is evident, but on the whole, it's complicated.

Early Memories

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on October 23, 2016 in How To Do Life
Our strongest early memories may offer clues for what we're like today and what we can be tomorrow.

Can Novels Influence Our Beliefs About Reality?

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on October 22, 2016 in Trouble in Mind
Joyce Carol Oates’s depiction of an amnesiac, loosely based on HM, perpetuates negative stereotypes about women scientists.

Feeling Victimized by Presidential Campaign Updates?

Has the pain of your experiences as a sexual abuse survivor been re-activated by national news? Here are 7 suggestions to promote your well-being

Personality and the Brain, Part 2

“Leigh used to be the class clown,” Amber said. “She would immediately shift a sinister atmosphere into a cheerful one. Now she barely smiles."

Your Amygdala May House Both Positive and Negative Memories

By Christopher Bergland on October 17, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Positive and negative memories may be housed in specific regions of the amygdala, according to a new mice study. These findings offer many clues for overcoming negativity and fear.

Your Brain and That "Other National Deficit"

Recent research indicates that our brain's susceptibility to false memories of the past may actually come in handy in our encounters with unfamiliar situations in the future.

Giving Voice to Grief in a Novel Way

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on October 09, 2016 in Creating in Flow
A doctor imagines cloning his lost son to keep him alive in the minds of his debut novel's readers. This Q&A with the author explains the why and the how.

Alzheimer's Study Links Triad of Brain Areas with Cognition

By Christopher Bergland on October 07, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Researchers at Harvard Medical School have discovered that various Alzheimer's disease symptoms are linked to a combination of atrophy factors in three different brain regions.

How Aging Affects Our Sleep

What can we do to sleep well?

Childhood Sex Abuse: The Long, Hard Road to Sexual Healing

By Michael Castleman M.A. on October 03, 2016 in All About Sex
Myth: Child sex abuse ruins victims for life. Truth: Recovery is painful and may take years, but survivors CAN build fulfilling lives and loving, nurturing sexual relationships.