Essential Reads

Sleep Strengthens Recent Learning and Negative Memories

By Lydia Denworth on November 16, 2017 in Brain Waves
What happens in the brain during sleep? Quite a lot. Machine learning and EEG are revealing how memories, especially negative ones, and learning are boosted while we're asleep.

(Un)forgettable: Memory Tripping with One-Hit Wonders

A chance encounter with a forgotten song from one’s forgotten past contains three key ingredients for a positively potent—and potently positive—memory experience.

Understanding Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)

By Andrew E. Budson M.D. on November 12, 2017 in Managing Your Memory
The pathology of Aaron Hernandez was just one part of the 2017 Boston University CTE Conference, which presented the latest research and our current understanding of this disorder.

How Stable Is the Personal Past?

By Christin Köber Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in What's Your Story?
Did you ever wonder what your life story would look like if you told it several times, at different moments in your life?

More Posts on Memory

Aging Shrinks the Brain

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on September 23, 2017 in Memory Medic
Age discrimination is not defensible. Each elderly person's mental competence has to be judged on its own merits, not on a negative stereotype of the elderly.

What Creates Superior Brain Connectivity, According to Study

By Susan Reynolds on September 19, 2017 in Prime Your Gray Cells
Participants on the “positive” side reflected stronger connectivity associated with higher cognitive functions, including memory, language, introspection, and imagination.

Exploding Three Myths and Stereotypes of Aging

Are we really predestined to become senile and fall apart as we age? Let's stand up for ourselves and appreciate the facts of growing older.

The World Isn’t Designed Well for People With Bipolar

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on September 11, 2017 in Take Control
How can we better engineer products to help people with bipolar disorder?

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Honor the Irreplaceable Moments

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on September 03, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Moments in our life that are unique and memorable bring opportunities to show love of our self and of another. They require us to slow down, allow the mystical, and be authentic.

Pressing the Button

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on September 02, 2017 in How To Do Life
At death’s door, she revisits her life.

Remembering Barbara Cook

By Susan Hooper on August 30, 2017 in Detours and Tangents
Legendary singer Barbara Cook, who died in August at 89, overcame crippling mid-career alcoholism and depression. Her 2016 memoir "Then & Now" is a moving reflection on her life.

Do We See the World Like a Movie?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 26, 2017 in Memory Medic
The two-stage model of perception may have profound implications beyond sensation that involve working memory, ideation, reasoning, decision-making, and voluntary behavior.
Life Sciences Database/Wikimedia Commons

Want to Keep Your Brain Youthful? You Should Be Dancing

By Christopher Bergland on August 26, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
New research confirms that any type of aerobic activity has neuroprotective benefits. That said, learning choreographed dance routines appear to have specific anti-aging benefits.

Back to School: Packing Your Emotional Backpack

Witnessing the pain of our children—the shutting down and withdrawal—may reawaken feeling-traps of our own, and cause us to respond in disproportionate ways.

Do Adult Dogs Still Recognize Their Mothers?

Does the emotional link between a canine mother and her puppies carry over into their adulthood?

To Heal Trauma, Work with the Body

When cognitive therapy is not enough to heal trauma, consider taking a body-based approach.

Are Older People Wiser?

By Lawrence R Samuel Ph.D. on August 20, 2017 in Boomers 3.0
Memory worsens as we get older, but research also suggests that our strategy for the way that we process thoughts and information changes for the better.

What Your Earliest Food Memories Say About You

Memories of food associated with growing up influence you in ways you never realized. New research shows the role that food memory plays in adapting to adult life.

Is Your Brain Older Than You Are?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 15, 2017 in Memory Medic
Memory loss is a main symptom of excessive brain aging that we can all notice.

First Memories

Like a child who uses a blanket to self-soothe, a memory may be a psychological mechanism awakened at certain moments to protect us from hopelessness.

How Over-Learning can Solidify a Skill

Can practicing a skill beyond the point of mastery solidify it in memory? Study suggests it can, and that neural inhibition might prevent interference by another task.

Criticizing a Saint Part 2

By Timothy Pytell Ph.D. on August 09, 2017 in On Authoritarian Therapy
Revisiting the decision not to interview Viktor Frankl.

Glen Campbell’s Farewell Tour, Accompanied by Alzheimer’s

By Dean Olsher LCAT, MT-BC, MS on August 09, 2017 in A Sound Mind
"Even though Campbell cannot recognize himself in a home movie from his younger days, he is still able to deploy his exquisite singing voice and guitar chops onstage."

Mental Down Time Affects Learning

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 04, 2017 in Memory Medic
"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy," might be re-framed, "all work and no rest makes Jack a poor learner."

Unimagined Sensitivities—Series Conclusion

By Michael Jawer on August 01, 2017 in Feeling Too Much
Death—and its close relative, trauma—may trigger perceptions that subvert the normal bounds of space and time. The fascinating evidence merits serious investigation.

Focused Distractions? How We Adapt to Multi-Tasking

By Alan Castel Ph.D. on July 31, 2017 in Metacognition and the Mind
“Don’t distract me, I am multitasking”: Distractions can be damaging, but even when multi-tasking, we learn how to focus on what is important.

Can Sweet Memories Neutralize Conflict?

When intimate partners fight to win, their conflicts can easily deteriorate into accusations, invalidations, and character assassinations.

Green Tea May Ameliorate Brain Drain Linked to Western Diets

A pioneering new study reports that a compound in green tea (EGCG) may prove to be a therapeutic intervention for diet-related memory impairment and neuroinflammation.

Reminiscing and Contemplating

There is a natural tendency with age to live too much in the past.

How Good Is a Dog's Ability to Remember People?

There are suggestions that dogs can remember and may recognize particular people even after years of separation.

Do Brain-Changing Games Really Work?

By Lydia Denworth on July 14, 2017 in Brain Waves
Want to improve your thinking and memory? Think brain-changing games might help? A new study looked at their effect on the brain, on cognitive performance, and on decision-making.

Promising New Treatment for Depression

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on July 13, 2017 in Memory Medic
Recent research emphasizes the importance of memory as therapy for depression.

Caution: Memory at Work

By Paula Croxson Ph.D. on July 09, 2017 in Selective Memory
A new study sheds light on how we keep our minds on the task at hand even when faced with the distractions of modern life.

Trauma Nation

The cultural movement of recovering trauma is actually a psychological disaster of its own making. The answers—forward planning and community building—are nowhere apparent.