Memory Essential Reads

Prions, Memory and PTSD

By Shaili Jain M.D. on August 26, 2015 in The Aftermath of Trauma
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has been described as a disorder of memory. It has become quite apparent that there are two types of memory in PTSD. The work of Eric R. Kandel forms the basis for much of what we understand about how memories are formed.

Memories of Trauma

By David Myers on August 26, 2015 in Talk Psych
Imagine yourself as a traumatized passenger on a transatlantic flight that has run out of fuel and is seemingly destined to crash in the ocean. Such was the real life experience of psychologist Margaret MacKinnon, who, with colleagues, later compared passengers' memories with actual flight events. Their findings teach us a lesson about human memory.

Why Are Optimists Smiling? Are They Blind to Reality?

By Arthur J. Clark Ed.D. on August 25, 2015 in Dawn of Memories
Understanding a Person's Outlook on Life Through Early Recollections

Objects and Memories...and the Pain of Letting Go

By Barry Yourgrau on August 24, 2015 in Mess
The Pain of Letting Go

Exploring the Good Kind of Disobedience

By John P. Schuster on August 17, 2015 in The Power of Your Past
Intelligent Disobedience. I recommend this book to all of us interested in the implications of the Hoffman Report, and to everyone not in psychology but interested in human courage in the face of collective evil.

What's Wrong with Antianxiety Drugs?

Recognition of the multiplicity of the brain systems that contribute to fear and anxiety disorders is the first step towards the development of better treatments.

The Amygdala Is NOT the Brain's Fear Center

The amygdala is not a "fear" center out of which effuses the feeling of being afraid. "Fear" is a cognitively assembled conscious experience that is based on threat detection, arousal, attention, perception, memory, and other neural processes.

Welcome to "I Got a Mind to Tell You"

Want the facts about mind, brain, mental and mental disorders. Follow "I Got a Mind to Tell You."

The Curious Connection Between Distraction and Impulsivity

By David DiSalvo on August 01, 2015 in Neuronarrative
Science is steadily uncovering a link between handicapped working memory resources and handicapped impulse control, with all its unfortunate shortcomings.

How to Get the Most Out of Your Vacation

By Juliana Breines Ph.D. on July 31, 2015 in In Love and War
Vacation time is precious, and most people don’t get nearly enough of it. So how can you make the most of the time you do have? Research suggests that these eight strategies may help.

Liar, Liar, Working Memory on Fire

Working Memory can make you a better liar, research shows

Sherlock Holmes: The Case of Memory and Aging

Sherlock Holmes is the quintessential detective, but what happens to his memory and his mind in old age? The new movie Mr. Holmes, as well as current research on cognitive aging, allow for an important case study on memory and aging.

What We Really Needed From Our Parents

When we reflect on our childhood we tend to recall the tough times -- times when we as kids screwed up, or when our parents failed. It turns out that the dance between love and hate, doing right and doing wrong, and above all making amends is critical for secure attachments. We learn to trust other, indeed, we learn to be moral as part of a normal developmental process.

Why High School Stays with You Forever (Like It or Not)

For some of us, high school shines like an enchanted kingdom; for others, it is remembered as an endless Hell of daily torments. For most of us, it is something in between, but memorable nonetheless. Is it the collision between evolved psychological mechanisms and the nature of the modern high school that is to blame?

How and Why Color Matters in Early Recollections

The experience of color in early recollections occurs only with a minority of persons. The meaning of color to these individuals is often life-orienting and personally enriching. The "color-minded" remind all people of the vitality and wonder of color as a human endowment.

New Research Tools to Test Brain Injury

By Eric Newhouse on July 01, 2015 in Invisible Wounds
Scientists at UCLA have been studying the brains of retired football players to determine what types of brain damage are caused by repeated concussions, and new technologies are allowing them to examine living brains. The next step will involve combat vets to see how they differ from NFL players and from Alzheimer's victims.

Digital Dementia

By Susan Greenfield Ph.D. on July 01, 2015 in Mind Change
Action video games improve low level attention and visuospatial memory, but is there a link between gaming and a more global loss of memory reminiscent of dementia?

4 Observations on Memory and Emotion

By Alex Korb Ph.D. on June 30, 2015 in PreFrontal Nudity
Watching Pixar's Inside-Out, I was moved through a full range of emotions, but also, as a neuroscientist, I was impressed with the nuanced depiction of complex brain functions that the movie depicted. Understanding these can help you better understand yourself:

3 Reasons Not to Spend Your Money on Things

By Amie M. Gordon PhD on June 30, 2015 in Between You and Me
The other weekend I went to the mall in search of new running shoes. When I arrived, the parking lot was so full that I had to circle around before I found a spot. The stores were equally crowded inside. Apparently none of these shoppers had read Leaf Van Boven's 2005 review article highlighting the benefits of spending money on experiences over material goods.

Sober Summer!

For those trying to cut back on their drinking or for sober alcoholics, the summertime and the many celebrations that accompany it can be temptations.Many will report that the warm weather, the outdoor bars, family gatherings, vacations, the beach, sporting events, etc. can bring back memories of “the good ole’ days”. Here are some tips for sober summertime fun!

Can Evolution Explain All Human Behavior?

Evolutionary explanations of human behavior abound and they call on what we know about evolution. However, proving the validity of these explanations is another story. Why is that?

Why Jobs That Make You Think Are Good Brain Medicine

By David DiSalvo on June 28, 2015 in Neuronarrative
Adding to an already robust catalog of research showing that thinking-related challenges are like exercise for the brain, the latest study shows that jobs involving high levels of “executive, verbal and fluid” tasks enhance memory and thinking abilities for years to come.

The Consistency of Flashbulb Memories

By Art Markman Ph.D. on June 26, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
I remember as a kid that my parents shared vivid memories of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. They could tell me where they were and who they were with when they found out the president had been shot. In 1977, Roger Brown and James Kulik called memories like this flashbulb memories.

Top 10 'Memory' Diet Tips

A healthy diet optimizes brain health, memory function, and reduces risk of dementia.

What Will Your Children Remember About You?

Raising a child can be daunting. In the midst of the hectic effort to meet all our children’s needs, we might wonder what will make the most important difference in their lives. What will they remember best about their childhood experiences with us?

Traumatic Consequences of the Rwandan Genocide of 1994

Our project aims to listen to the ways in which individual Rwandans interpret their own lives and to examine posttraumatic growth in the context of post-genocide Rwanda.

Another Flashbulb Memory Bites the Dust

Guest post by a student who has a memory of September 11th, 2001, that is vivid, clear, and wrong.

Mental Fitness for Seniors

Baby boomers are one of the largest aging cohorts ever. Given that more seniors than ever will be driving, traveling, and working, there is an urgency to staying mentally fit.

6 Ways That Tonight's Dreams Could Change Your Life

Can we benefit from thinking about our dreams? Will attending to our dreams waste our time or, even worse, mislead us into inferences of false meaning?

Music's Effects on Cognitive Function of the Elderly

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in Memory Medic
Music can be therapy for old age.