Memory Essential Reads

Sleep Strengthens Recent Learning and Negative Memories

By Lydia Denworth on November 16, 2017 in Brain Waves
What happens in the brain during sleep? Quite a lot. Machine learning and EEG are revealing how memories, especially negative ones, and learning are boosted while we're asleep.

(Un)forgettable: Memory Tripping with One-Hit Wonders

A chance encounter with a forgotten song from one’s forgotten past contains three key ingredients for a positively potent—and potently positive—memory experience.

Understanding Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)

By Andrew E. Budson M.D. on November 12, 2017 in Managing Your Memory
The pathology of Aaron Hernandez was just one part of the 2017 Boston University CTE Conference, which presented the latest research and our current understanding of this disorder.

How Stable Is the Personal Past?

By Christin Köber Ph.D. on November 09, 2017 in What's Your Story?
Did you ever wonder what your life story would look like if you told it several times, at different moments in your life?

Brain Imaging Shows We Can Unlearn Chronic Pain

By Eric Haseltine Ph.D. on October 27, 2017 in Long Fuse, Big Bang
New hope for previously untreatable pain.

He Said, She Said, and a Videotape

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on October 23, 2017 in Mental Mishaps
Sometimes we get caught telling a whopper. And sometimes, our whopper may not actually be a lie. How should you respond?

Tap Into the Inner Genius You Didn’t Know You Had

Research show that genius is inside each of us, but how can we access it?

Getting Sentimental Could Increase Your Savings

By Brad Klontz Psy.D., CFP on October 12, 2017 in Mind Over Money
How can we harness positive, emotionally charged memories to develop a deeper incentive for saving?

Why People Hold Grudges and What to Do About Them

When people hold grudges against you, it can be painful and confusing. New research shows there’s a reason they act this way. Understanding why may help you feel a bit better.

The Art of Nostalgia

Nostalgia is an aesthetic form of memory, and our relation to our nostalgic memories is much like that of a painter to a work of art.

Taking a Stand When Taking a Knee

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on October 09, 2017 in Mental Mishaps
How we rewrite and romanticize memories of protests.

Seeking Redemption: The Rage of Alzheimer’s

By Greg O'Brien on October 04, 2017 in On Pluto
Profane language can be common in Alzheimer’s. An expression of gut rage and loss of filter, along with inadvertent grabbing, kicking, pushing, and throwing.

Inositol and Choline in Mental Health Care

Are you curious about inositol, choline and other B vitamins in mental health care? Emerging findings suggest these vitamins may reduce symptoms of depressed mood and anxiety.

Expressive Writing Liberates the Mind from Chronic Worrying

By Christopher Bergland on September 24, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Taking a few minutes to jot down your innermost thoughts and feelings can offload chronic worries and makes your brain more efficient, according to a new study.

What Narcissists Won’t Tell You About Their Past

Although no one’s memory is perfect, memory in people high in narcissism is particularly flawed, especially when it comes to their flaws. New research shows why they're so biased.

Low Brain Cholesterol—Separating Fact from Fiction

By Georgia Ede MD on September 17, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
How vegan diets and cholesterol-lowering drugs affect mood and memory.

Right Brain and Left Brain Share Duties On "As Needed" Basis

By Christopher Bergland on September 17, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Growing evidence debunks the myth of creativity being seated in the "right brain." A new Duke study illuminates how the left brain and right brain can share duties when necessary.

The Sound of Memory

By Mark D. Humphries Ph.D. on September 16, 2017 in Neural Processing
"You must remember this song!" How your brain remembers what you hear

Bipolar Disorder and Expectations About the Future

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on September 10, 2017 in Take Control
I thought I could handle things, but bipolar really interferes.

Misremembering American History

Do you know your American history? Your reaction to current events may reveal some surprising blind spots.

Why Do Humans Make Art?

By Nathan H. Lents, Ph.D. on September 05, 2017 in Beastly Behavior
Understanding the the many aspects of art reveals its possible functions and origins in our past.

What the World Needs More: Social Interest

By Arthur J. Clark Ed.D. on September 04, 2017 in Dawn of Memories
The Most Human Way of Being and Early Recollections

4 Reasons Why We Forget People's Names

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 02, 2017 in Talking Apes
Humans are quite good at recognizing familiar faces, but we often fail to remember even familiar names.

Remembering Accidentally on Purpose

It's a well-known, unfortunate fact of life that some of our memory functions decline as we age, but recent studies suggest there may be a silver lining to that gray cloud.

Your Memories Make You Who You Are

Don't worry if can't remember the details of your first kiss that well. Your unconscious does it for you.
Volha_R/Shutterstock

You Really Need to Be Tracking Your Dreams

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on August 01, 2017 in Dream Catcher
Recording and working with your dreams on a regular basis may allow you to better predict your illnesses, cultivate your creativity and improve your daily social interactions.

Never Again Forget a Name With This Proven Method

Everyone wishes to have a better memory for faces, but so far there's been no magic bullet. A new study based on a popular game shows how to make that magic work for you.

7 Major Questions (and Answers) About Dreaming

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on July 28, 2017 in Sleep Newzzz
Dreaming is a strange and mysterious process — one that scientists don’t fully understand. Let’s take a closer look at the stuff of which dreams are made.

Ravens Plan for the Future; Rats Know When They've Forgotten

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on July 27, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Research on animal cognition is yielding very interesting results. New studies show ravens show flexibility in planning for the future and rats know when they've forgotten stuff.

Dementia of Youth—Why Our Memories Are So Unreliable

Do you feel a little lost in your life choices? Small mindset shifts can go a long way