Memory Essential Reads

Social Intelligence and Nonverbal Communications

By Joe Navarro M.A. on February 27, 2015 in Spycatcher
Why exercising social intelligence matters and why it can dominate a news cycle

Living in the Here and Now

By Susan Hooper on February 26, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
For most of my life, I have wanted to be somewhere else, living an entirely different life. A calendar from years ago showed me that I had then—and may even have now—a life that other people might envy.

The Surprising Benefits of Documenting Ordinary Experiences

By Juliana Breines Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in In Love and War
Typically it’s the big milestones that we document most diligently—the weddings, births, graduations, professional achievements. These are the events we expect we’ll most want to revisit down the road. But research suggests that revisiting ordinary, everyday experiences can bring us a lot more pleasure than we realize.

Can You Get Drunk Off of Water?

Don't blame it on the alcohol! Blame it on your expectations about drinking.

A+ Students/C- Learners: Education’s Report Card

By APA Division 15 on February 24, 2015 in PsychEd
Today’s educational system is contributing to an undesirable and unanticipated problem—the production of many achievement-oriented, high-performing students who are, at best, mediocre learners. This is a bold and controversial claim that demands substantiation. beginning with what distinguishes good students from good learners.

Traveling Through Time

By Dr. Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Trouble in Mind
Our ability to mentally travel back and forward in time gives us our sense of self and enhances our lives and coping abilities in many ways.

Nobody Can Steal Spent Money

By Christopher Ryan on February 22, 2015 in Sex at Dawn
Can we stop acting as if not dying is an option? Listen carefully, and you'll hear people say things like, "If I die, I want it to be painless." If? There is no "if" about it.

Mindfulness for Chronic Pain

By Michael Hogan Ph.D on February 20, 2015 in In One Lifespan
There is a strong emerging body of evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches for a range of difficulties, including chronic pain. We tried to take mindfulness for chonic pain online. We called our programme Mindfulness in Action (MIA). The results of our MIA trial were interesting.

An Ode to Common Core Kindergarten Standards

There is much wrong with American kindergartens—but Common Core State Standards are not to blame. If interpreted correctly, Common Core standards for literacy enable us to help enhance the kindergarten experience for all kindergarten children—from the underprepared to the most gifted and advanced.

Pressure at the Academy Awards

By Hendrie Weisinger on February 18, 2015 in Thicken Your Skin
Most people perform below their capability in a pressure moment.

Why We Remember What We Want to Remember

When public figures erroneously report on events that didn’t actually happen in their lives, the whole world knows about it. However, false memories are a common occurrence in everyone’s day-to-day thinking. Remembering what you want to remember may be more a matter of identity than of failing memory.

The Role of Sleep in our Lives

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on February 13, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
Many scientists studying sleep and dreams believe that dreaming does have a purpose.

Fifty Shades of Grue

By David Ludden Ph.D. on February 13, 2015 in Talking Apes
Language doesn’t bind us to a particular world view, but it does dominate the way we perceive and think about our experiences.

The Truth About False Memories

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on February 12, 2015 in Good Thinking
Implanting false memories in people is not as easy as we've been led to believe.

How Much Sleep Do You Really Need?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on February 11, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
I have written a few times about the influence of sleep on thinking. High school students who stay up late perform more poorly in school the following day. A lack of sleep may cause you to mix together different memories that did not occur together. In young adults, sleep also affects the ability to learn new procedures.

Can Other People Make You Less Creative?

By Liane Gabora Ph.D. on February 06, 2015 in Mindbloggling
Do you sometimes feel more creative when you are alone? Though it is widely believed that stimulating environments enhance creativity this is not always the case. People may send out social signals to each other to conform, thereby ensuring that creativity--the process that fuels cultural novelty--is balanced by conformity--the process that perpetuates successful novelty.

What Is Mindfulness and How Does It Work?

By Gregg Henriques on February 06, 2015 in Theory of Knowledge
Mindfulness is one of the most important developments in mental health in the past twenty years. Understand what it is and how it works.

Criminality and Dementia

Criminal behaviors that begin in mid or late life may be a consequence of dementia. The types of crimes committed by persons with Alzheimer’s disease differ from those committed by persons with frontotemporal dementia.

God Is Just a Natural Disaster Away

Reversing the effects of secularization in a moment

The Vaccine Controversy: Through an Evolutionary Lens

In recent weeks, non-vaccinating parents have been blamed for being ignorant, stupid, or worse. But calling someone stupid does not seem like an effective way of getting parents to agree to do something that they believe might harm their child. Another way to look at parents’ fears about the risks of vaccinating is to look at decision making through an evolutionary lens.

How to Use All 5 Senses to Beat Stress

By Vinita Mehta Ph.D., Ed.M. on February 04, 2015 in Head Games
With the hassles of everyday life, it's easy for a bad day to take a downward spiral. Studies show that you can feel better by engaging the five senses. Here are five research-backed ways to de-stress and connect more deeply to your senses.

How a Word on the Tip of Your Tongue Can Cloud Your Judgment

By Anne M. Cleary Ph.D. on February 03, 2015 in Quirks of Memory
Do you ever feel as if a word is on the tip of your tongue, just out of reach of access? It turns out that such tip-of-the-tongue experiences can lead to bias in decision-making.

What, Me Worry?

By Daniel Voyer Ph.D. on January 30, 2015 in Perceptual Asymmetries
Many people use worry as a coping mechanism. Are you one of them? I am one of them! Thankfully, how other people beat their worry habit can help you too as we revisit an old pop psychology book on this topic.

It’s Not What You Say, But How You Say It

By David Ludden Ph.D. on January 30, 2015 in Talking Apes
Most of our daily conversations are about building and maintaining social relationships, and the actual content of those conversations is usually unimportant.

6 Ways to Recreate, Not Just Salvage, Your Relationship

In my previous post, I emphasized that merely "salvaging" a relationship can’t lead to meaningful, long-lasting couples’ change. The main problem with such rescuing is that it focuses mostly on reducing the negatives between the two beleaguered partners. What’s really needed is for them to identify—and effectively address—the deeper dynamics of their relational distress.

Are Your Smart Devices Causing You a Pain In the Neck?

By Steve Sisgold on January 27, 2015 in Life in a Body
The more cell phones, electronic tablets, virtual games and computers that we use, the more we build stress in our bodies.

Health Benefits of Resveratrol: New Plaudits

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on January 25, 2015 in Memory Medic
If you could only take one pill, would this be the one?

Healing the Shame of Childhood Abuse Through Self-Compassion

Shame can be the most damaging effect of child abuse--compassion is its anecdote.

10 Tips for Reducing Anger

By Steven Laurent on January 15, 2015 in Chill Pill
I think some readers may take exception to tip no. 4. And many will struggle with no. 7 (myself included); but it's no reason not to strive for it...

Making Space for Grieving

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on January 12, 2015 in The Web of Violence
Thoughts about how to create some time and space for grieving after the loss of a loved one.