Essential Reads

Another Flashbulb Memory Bites the Dust

Guest post: I remember 9/11 so clearly in my mind. And so wrongly.

Mental Fitness for Seniors

Isn't Mental Fitness as Important as Physical Fitness?

How Dreams Help Us Transcend Time and Place

Dreams reveal the emotions that connect our past, present, and future.

Music's Effects on Cognitive Function of the Elderly

"Where there is life there is music. Where there is music, there is life."

Recent Posts on Memory

The Wacky Neuroscience of Forgetting How to Ride a Bicycle

A new experiment with a "backwards brain bicycle" illustrates how easy it is to forget everything you thought you knew about riding a bicycle. In this blog post, I'll explore the neuroscience behind learning—and forgetting—how to ride a bicycle.

Remembering Frederic Hudson

Entering the Wardrobe and Falling Into a Rabbit Hole: a fortuitous invitation

Of Dogs and Memory

The ‘storehouse’ of memory is an important base source, providing the ‘ammunition’ that stimulates the human imagination to wander at will.

Decision-Making 101

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on May 21, 2015 in Memory Medic
Good decision making depends on selective attention skills. Seniors are better at this than young people, whose culture and schools are making matters worse.

Another Flashbulb Memory Bites the Dust

Guest post by a student who has a memory of September 11th, 2001, that is vivid, clear, and wrong.

Mental Fitness for Seniors

Baby boomers are one of the largest aging cohorts ever. Given that more seniors than ever will be driving, traveling, and working, there is an urgency to staying mentally fit.

World War II Memories

A I was to young to remember much about it. But I've been so riveted to other people's dramatizations of the war in books, films or on the screen, that the war has felt like part of my psychic reality. You could say I've been just one step shy of suffering a Brian Williams type 'embellishment syndrome.'

New Evidence on Dreams and Memory

The dream lag effect, wherein images from daily events appear in dreams 5-7 days later, appears to be restricted to personally significant events only.

Episodic Memories

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on May 12, 2015 in In Excess
Over the past year I have been interviewed a couple of times about the seeming increase in ‘binge watching’ of DVD box sets of television series. But what is it that makes us sit down and watch a whole television series on one day back-to-back? What is the psychology behind 'box set bingeing?'

How to Turn Off that Earworm

By David J Ley Ph.D. on May 10, 2015 in Women Who Stray
Next time you find a song playing in your head, try this simple technique to kill that earworm dead.

What Excites You?

All love is based on the experience of positive emotion, and the part of love that makes your heart thump owes its power to the emotion of excitement that began in early childhood.

12 Ways Eye Movements Give Away Your Secrets

Eye movements unconsciously give away your secret personal information.

How Dreams Help Us Transcend Time and Place

Can we benefit from thinking about our dreams? Will attending to our dreams waste our time or, even worse, mislead us into inferences of false meaning?

Music's Effects on Cognitive Function of the Elderly

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in Memory Medic
Music can be therapy for old age.

Will Sleep Apnea Give Me Alzheimer's?

In dreams begin realities—but to remember stuff you need to sleep effectively.

Optogenetics Allow Neuroscientists to Turn Fear Off and On

Neuroscientists at MIT have discovered how to turn the neural circuitry of fear conditioning on and off. This could lead to better treatments for PTSD, anxiety disorders, and avoidance learning.

Lucky Man

By Susan Hooper on April 29, 2015 in Detours and Tangents
My grandfather died suddenly in his fifties from a heart attack, leaving behind a wife and four sons. But years earlier he had sidestepped death on the Titanic and possibly the Lusitania, too. Did he die prematurely or did he have the good fortune to live far beyond the number of years the Fates had originally allotted him?

Why Are Cannabis Users Susceptible to Memory Distortion?

A new study reports that chronic cannabis use can make imaginary memories seem like reality.

Why We Hate It When Someone Steals Our Life Story

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on April 28, 2015 in Mental Mishaps
Have you, or anyone you know, ever been the victim of memory theft? Has someone ever stolen one of your memories and told the story as his or her own? You might be surprised by how frequently this crime happens—you aren’t alone if your memories have been stolen.

This Is How You Should Learn

By Jen Kim on April 28, 2015 in Valley Girl With a Brain
According to research from the National Academy of Sciences, the most effective (and exemplary) teaching methods are those that truly engage its students.

Mapping Altered States of Consciousness

Lucid dreaming seems far closer to waking than to deep sleep but what does this mean? Could we ever map states of consciousness and understand the relationships between them?

What Is the Optimally Efficient Gap Between Study Sessions?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Memory Medic
Learning success depends on when you study.

Men Lose Their Memory Faster With Age

By Temma Ehrenfeld on April 23, 2015 in Open Gently
Men lose their memory faster than women.

Returning to an Unchanged Place Reveals How You Have Changed

Returning to a place from your past that remains unchanged can reveal how you've evolved and give you clues as to where you should go with your life from here.

Why It's Vital to Empty Your Head Every Night

Emptying mental garbage can save your life

We Don't Repress Painful Childhood Memories

By Temma Ehrenfeld on April 22, 2015 in Open Gently
Most people remember incidents of sexual abuse as children though they may not have understood them.

Back to the Future

By David Ludden Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in Talking Apes
Our brains don’t store everything that happens to us, only those events that may have future relevance.

Addiction: A Systems Perspective

By Dan Mager MSW on April 21, 2015 in Some Assembly Required
The dynamics of systems theory and neuroplasticity can provide valuable windows through which we can better understand the respective processes that contribute to addiction and recovery.

Power Naps Help Your Hippocampus Consolidate Memories

Taking a power nap helps your hippocampus consolidate memories and helps you seize the day.

Motor Activity Improves Working Memory in Children with ADHD

A new study suggests that a majority of students with ADHD could perform better on classroom work, tests, and homework if they were allowed to sit on activity balls or exercise bikes while learning.