Essential Reads

The Value of Proper Police Lineup Procedures

By Art Markman Ph.D. on October 25, 2016 in Ulterior Motives
Police lineup procedure has been influenced by psychological research. One thing the police do is to minimize the effects of distinctive features of faces. Here's why they do that.

Death Penalty May Not Bring Peace to Victims' Families

Does the death penalty provide true justice and closure to victims?

Groundbreaking Study Roots Out Signs of Depression in Brain

By Christopher Bergland on October 18, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
This pioneering discovery could lead to more effective treatments for depression.
IgorGolovniov /

Keeping America's Kids from Being Politically Wounded

By John P. Schuster on October 13, 2016 in The Power of Your Past
After watching the presidential debates, I think we have an obligation to our grandkids. We need to tell them how political discourse used to be and how it can be again someday.

More Posts on Memory

4 Explanations for Déjà Vu

We still don't know that much about déjà vu. Here are 4 possible explanations for this phenomenon.

What Dogs Do After Training Affects How Much They Remember

Data shows that adding a play session after training can improve a dogs memory and performance by 40%.

Class Reunion

By Susan Hooper on October 24, 2016 in Detours and Tangents
For decades, I shuddered at the memory of my high school years. Attending my high school reunion helped me put those memories in a new context.

Art Therapy: Treating Combat-Related PTSD

Recent research underscores that art therapy's role in the resolution of trauma is evident, but on the whole, it's complicated.

Early Memories

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on October 23, 2016 in How To Do Life
Our strongest early memories may offer clues for what we're like today and what we can be tomorrow.

Can Novels Influence Our Beliefs About Reality?

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on October 22, 2016 in Trouble in Mind
Joyce Carol Oates’s depiction of an amnesiac, loosely based on HM, perpetuates negative stereotypes about women scientists.

Feeling Victimized by Presidential Campaign Updates?

Has the pain of your experiences as a sexual abuse survivor been re-activated by national news? Here are 7 suggestions to promote your well-being

Personality and the Brain, Part 2

“Leigh used to be the class clown,” Amber said. “She would immediately shift a sinister atmosphere into a cheerful one. Now she barely smiles."

Your Amygdala May House Both Positive and Negative Memories

By Christopher Bergland on October 17, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Positive and negative memories may be housed in specific regions of the amygdala, according to a new mice study. These findings offer many clues for overcoming negativity and fear.

Your Brain and That "Other National Deficit"

Recent research indicates that our brain's susceptibility to false memories of the past may actually come in handy in our encounters with unfamiliar situations in the future.

Giving Voice to Grief in a Novel Way

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on October 09, 2016 in Creating in Flow
A doctor imagines cloning his lost son to keep him alive in the minds of his debut novel's readers. This Q&A with the author explains the why and the how.

Alzheimer's Study Links Triad of Brain Areas with Cognition

By Christopher Bergland on October 07, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Researchers at Harvard Medical School have discovered that various Alzheimer's disease symptoms are linked to a combination of atrophy factors in three different brain regions.

How Aging Affects Our Sleep

What can we do to sleep well?

Childhood Sex Abuse: The Long, Hard Road to Sexual Healing

By Michael Castleman M.A. on October 03, 2016 in All About Sex
Myth: Child sex abuse ruins victims for life. Truth: Recovery is painful and may take years, but survivors CAN build fulfilling lives and loving, nurturing sexual relationships.

"Rendering the Unthinkable" at the 9/11 Museum

What can art contribute to our memories of the well documented 9/11 attacks?

Biscuits Before Breakfast: Recovery in Microcosm

By Emily T. Troscianko on September 30, 2016 in A Hunger Artist
Eating a plain biscuit reminds me of how different healthy eating needs to be during recovery.

Where Do Our Earliest Memories Come From?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 30, 2016 in Talking Apes
New research shows that autobiographical memory depends on our language skills, especially the ability to tell stories.

Coffee: Warding Off Dementia and Identifying Psychopaths

By Rita Watson MPH on September 28, 2016 in With Love and Gratitude
Coffee may ward off dementia and coffee preferences can help identify antisocial behavior.
By ProjectManhattan (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (], via Wikimedia Commons

5 Reasons Why We Crave Comfort Foods

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in Science of Choice
Comfort foods give distinctive pleasure or make us temporarily feel better.

The Mindspan Diet

By The Book Brigade on September 27, 2016 in The Author Speaks
America’s dietary recommendations may not be in the best interests of cognitive longevity.

Why Should You Write Your Memoir?

By Diana Raab Ph.D. on September 25, 2016 in The Empowerment Diary
Are you trying to decide whether to write your memoir? One reason people write their memoirs is because they feel they've got a story to tell and only they can tell it.

Childhood Sexual Abuse: Sexual Recovery Is Possible

By Michael Castleman M.A. on September 15, 2016 in All About Sex
Myth: childhood sexual abuse is so traumatic that it ruins women for life. Truth: recovery is possible, and survivors can create deep, satisfying sexual relationships.

5 Brain-Based Reasons to Teach Handwriting in School

Did you know that handwriting will make you and your child smarter than keyboarding?

7 Ways to Enhance Your Memory

By Ryan Anderson on September 13, 2016 in The Mating Game
Have you ever wondered if there is a simple way to improve your memory? This article gives you 7 evidence-based techniques you can use to become far better at retaining information
(Image by Randi Hutter Epstein): My Sleep Deprived Twins, Joey & Martha, circa 1997

Here's What a Bad Night's Sleep Really Does to Your Brain

Did you know lack of sleep shrinks a tiny brain gland? But there is a way to reverse it.

The Pleasures and Perils of Writing a Revealing Memoir

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on September 12, 2016 in Creating in Flow
A memoir can be written by anyone, yet the best ones are authored by those who have learned to dig deep and write what others might fear to.

Never Forget: The Lasting Psychological Impact of 9/11

By Joe Pierre M.D. on September 11, 2016 in Psych Unseen
We’re all survivors, but we’re all scarred.

Real Heroes Run Toward—Not Away From—Danger

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on September 10, 2016 in Black Belt Brain
A book excerpt from Project Superhero describing the experience of a first responder.

Study: More Exercise Isn't Necessarily Better for Your Brain

By Christopher Bergland on September 10, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Do you hate to exercise? If so, I have good news. A new study reports that you do not have to be an exercise fanatic to reap the neuroprotective benefits of physical activity.

Why Our Memories Seem to Change as We Age

What should we do when our future is limited and our past is solidified in our background? Should we improve our hindsight or pursue our dreams?