Essential Reads

Memory Loss Associated With Alzheimer's May Be Reversible

By Kevin Murnane, Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in The Info Monkey
New research holds out hope that the loss of memory function that accompanies Alzheimer's may be preventable and reversible if the disease is caught early enough.
Flickr/Joe Penna

5 Ways to Deal With Anniversary Reactions

By Ellen Hendriksen, Ph.D. on September 22, 2016 in How to Be Yourself
Anniversary reactions are distressing and very real. Here's what you can do when anniversary memories are anything but silver or gold.

What Eye Contact Can Do to You

Eye contact has the power to alter our behavior, attention, memory, and appraisal of who's looking at us. Is that always a good thing?

$50m Judgment Says Brain Training a Sham

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on September 19, 2016 in The Fallible Mind
Letting someone else sharpen your brain sounds great. Except it doesn't work, and you have to do the work yourself. The good news is that it isn't so hard.

More Posts on Memory

Biscuits Before Breakfast: Recovery in Microcosm

By Emily T. Troscianko on September 30, 2016 in A Hunger Artist
Eating a plain biscuit reminds me of how different healthy eating needs to be during recovery.

Where Do Our Earliest Memories Come From?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 30, 2016 in Talking Apes
New research shows that autobiographical memory depends on our language skills, especially the ability to tell stories.

Coffee: Warding Off Dementia and Identifying Psychopaths

By Rita Watson MPH on September 28, 2016 in With Love and Gratitude
Coffee may ward off dementia and coffee preferences can help identify antisocial behavior.
By ProjectManhattan (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

5 Reasons Why We Crave Comfort Foods

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in Science of Choice
Comfort foods give distinctive pleasure or make us temporarily feel better.

The Mindspan Diet

By The Book Brigade on September 27, 2016 in The Author Speaks
America’s dietary recommendations may not be in the best interests of cognitive longevity.
https://pixabay.com/en/type-typewriter-font-writing-1161949/

Why Should You Write Your Memoir?

By Diana Raab Ph.D. on September 25, 2016 in The Empowerment Diary
Are you trying to decide whether to write your memoir? One reason people write their memoirs is because they feel they've got a story to tell and only they can tell it.

Childhood Sexual Abuse: Sexual Recovery Is Possible

By Michael Castleman M.A. on September 15, 2016 in All About Sex
Myth: childhood sexual abuse is so traumatic that it ruins women for life. Truth: recovery is possible, and survivors can create deep, satisfying sexual relationships.

5 Brain-Based Reasons to Teach Handwriting in School

Did you know that handwriting will make you and your child smarter than keyboarding?

7 Ways to Enhance Your Memory

By Ryan Anderson on September 13, 2016 in The Mating Game
Have you ever wondered if there is a simple way to improve your memory? This article gives you 7 evidence-based techniques you can use to become far better at retaining information
(Image by Randi Hutter Epstein): My Sleep Deprived Twins, Joey & Martha, circa 1997

Here's What a Bad Night's Sleep Really Does to Your Brain

Did you know lack of sleep shrinks a tiny brain gland? But there is a way to reverse it.

The Pleasures and Perils of Writing a Revealing Memoir

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on September 12, 2016 in Creating in Flow
A memoir can be written by anyone, yet the best ones are authored by those who have learned to dig deep and write what others might fear to.

Never Forget: The Lasting Psychological Impact of 9/11

By Joe Pierre M.D. on September 11, 2016 in Psych Unseen
We’re all survivors, but we’re all scarred.

Real Heroes Run Toward—Not Away From—Danger

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on September 10, 2016 in Black Belt Brain
A book excerpt from Project Superhero describing the experience of a first responder.

Study: More Exercise Isn't Necessarily Better for Your Brain

By Christopher Bergland on September 10, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Do you hate to exercise? If so, I have good news. A new study reports that you do not have to be an exercise fanatic to reap the neuroprotective benefits of physical activity.

Why Our Memories Seem to Change as We Age

What should we do when our future is limited and our past is solidified in our background? Should we improve our hindsight or pursue our dreams?

Unearthing Rarely Heard Songs of Your Youth Is Revitalizing

By Christopher Bergland on September 08, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Overplayed songs become blasé. But, tracking down forgotten music of your youth—and reconnecting with rare nostalgic songs—can take you back in time and make you feel young again.

21 Common Reactions to Trauma

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on September 07, 2016 in Think, Act, Be
While everyone's reaction to trauma is unique, recovery can feel more manageable when we know what to expect in the aftermath—including opportunities for growth.

Memorizing: Faster, Easier, Longer Lasting, and More Fun

By Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed. on September 05, 2016 in Radical Teaching
If you want to remember something more easily, use more senses to construct memory. You'll store duplicates of the information in multiple banks of your brain’s storage system.

The Overlooked Value of Early Recollections

By Arthur J. Clark Ed.D. on September 04, 2016 in Dawn of Memories
An Unknown Proposition: Early Childhood Recollections Serve an Essential Purpose in Life.

The 15th Anniversary of 9/11

Has your understanding of 9/11 changed after fifteen years? What issues concern you now?

Music Research Highlights the Value of Concerts

By Rita Watson MPH on August 31, 2016 in With Love and Gratitude
Music is restorative and young pianist and cellist composers enliven our spirits.

Google vs. Memory: Use It or Lose It

Do you need Google to remind you how to change a tire? Jump start a car? Drive to the Target in the next town? Plan the public transportation route to the museum?

Muscle Memory—It’s in Your Head, Not Your Limbs

Don’t believe promises of “accelerated learning.” Four proven practices can boost retention and give you peace of mind instead.

Playing Games With Memory

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on August 24, 2016 in Play in Mind
New technology makes it less urgent that we commit facts to memory.
John Schuster

Original Teenage Soul

By John P. Schuster on August 18, 2016 in The Power of Your Past
The soulful social psychology of this weekend was not lost on any of us. We were celebrating the best parts of us that only these old friends know in its purest forms.

Why Theological Waywardness Is Inevitable

Natural penchants of mind, such as anthropomorphism, dispose people to think about gods in ways that often conflict with their religions' doctrines.

Why Do Siblings Have Different Memories of Growing Up?

Have you ever noticed siblings remember things differently? Partly because we each experienced a different family. We need to accept our different perceptions and each other.

Trump Speak

By Madelon Sprengnether on August 15, 2016 in Minding Memory
Professors of English are masters of speaking, writing, and critical thinking. My fear: Trump's misspoken word or phrase might plunge us into nuclear war.

What Makes These 6 New Novels Unforgettable?

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on August 05, 2016 in Creating in Flow
You probably don't remember every book you read. A novel sticks when characters are so real, emotions so genuine, that you experience the story as though an actual witness to it.

Does Watching Video Hurt Our Moral Judgments About the News?

We assume that in news, streaming video is always better than still images, but is that true? Video can undermine our best moral judgments by making it hard to access memory.