Essential Reads

Red vs. Blue: Which Should You Choose?

Has anyone researched whether playing on red team or the blue gives advantage?

Why We Remember What We Want to Remember

False memory, identity, and self-enhancing biases

Why Is There So Much Miscommunication Via Email and Text?

How we interpret electronic messages is shaped by our feelings

The Truth About False Memories

We've been misled about the ease with which false memories can be implanted.

Recent Posts on Media

The Blue/Black-White/Gold Dress & Questioning Reality

The blue and black & white and gold dress debate is actually very deep and profound.

How Old is an Old(er) Woman?

The new BOND female lead is FOUR YEARS OLDER than Edith Bunker. There's more for women over fifty to do with their hands these days.

The Girl Who Wanted to be Spock: A Tribute to Leonard Nimoy

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Good Thinking
Spock was stable as a ocean-liner in stormy seas, a place of solace and practicality when crisis hit. He saw things clearly and keenly. And my fascination with him made me become a cognitive scientist.

Winning Moves in "Searching for Bobby Fischer"

By Skip Dine Young Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Movies and the Mind
"Searching for Bobby Fischer" is a movie about greatness in chess. But more than that, it is about maintaining compassion as one pursues excellence. It is also a caution to parents who may be tempted to overly identify with their children's success.

What Can We Learn About Love From ‘The Bachelor’?

By Goal Auzeen Saedi Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Millennial Media
Nineteen seasons in, and I'm still shamefully watching the show. As a psychologist, I can’t help but be fascinated by this dramatized reality show. As a girl, I’m sitting with my big bowl of popcorn secretly hoping there is a fairytale ending to it all. Which begs the question—how much of the show is real, and what (if anything) can we learn from it?

Red vs. Blue: Which Should You Choose?

By Jamie Madigan Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Mind Games
Has anyone ever done research on whether playing on the red team or the blue gives one a mental edge in games? Yep.

Waldorf Schools: Are They Way Behind the Times?

By Maureen D Healy on February 24, 2015 in Creative Development
Are computers a must-have for today's tech savvy kids?

Empire: A New Model for Bipolar Disorder on TV

By Ruth C. White Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Culture in Mind
Empire is a new hit TV show on the Fox Network that not only breaks ground as a black family drama based in hip-hop culture, but it shows a rare character with bipolar disorder who is not falling apart at the seams. Andre, the eldest son of a family music dynasty, has a degree from an elite school and (so far) successfully runs the family's multi-faceted business empire.

Missing That 'Vast Wasteland'

The real problem is that when people tell you about a series they've been watching or have watched, they never just say it's "pretty good" or "worth watching." They say it's "great!" or "incredible!" and that you just HAVE to watch it. Back in the old days, I don't remember anyone saying, "You just HAVE to watch 'Lassie'!"

How to Survive a Slasher Film

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in Media Spotlight
Do you think you're trapped in a slasher film? A new research study published in the journal Psychology of Popular Media Culture provides an in-depth look at Final Girls over three decades of slasher films and what it was that enabled them to survive to the end of the movie. The study results may surprise you.

Health Insurance—Insuring Insecurity

Corruption breeds cynicism—welcome to health insurance

Why Does Anyone Love Men Who Won't Love Back?

By Robert T Muller Ph.D. on February 19, 2015 in Talking About Trauma
Guest writer Aviva Philipp-Muller examines why Hollywood glorifies characters who exhibit a dismissing-avoidant attachment style.

Talking Online Can Be Life Changing For Sexual Minority Guys

By Michele Ybarra MPH, Ph.D. on February 18, 2015 in Connected
The Internet can be an important source of health information & social support for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) teens. Our recent study builds on this finding. We conducted message board discussions with gay, bisexual, and queer teen guys. While these may seem like old news, these can be a great way to bring people with similar interest together.

Why We Remember What We Want to Remember

When public figures erroneously report on events that didn’t actually happen in their lives, the whole world knows about it. However, false memories are a common occurrence in everyone’s day-to-day thinking. Remembering what you want to remember may be more a matter of identity than of failing memory.

Why Does the Fifty Shades Movie Look Like Domestic Abuse?

By Stephen Snyder M.D. on February 16, 2015 in SexualityToday
In the theater, I realized that the idea of Fifty Shades just being fantasy and therefore innocuous doesn't completely work. Some of the fantasy on-screen struck me as too close to the things people put up with in real life.

Why Is There So Much Miscommunication Via Email and Text?

Why Is There So Much Miscommunication Via Email and Text? How we interpret electronic messages is shaped by our feelings. By Melissa Ritter, Ph.D.

The Psychology of Brian Williams

By Stanton Peele on February 14, 2015 in Addiction in Society
Brian Williams' transgressions result from a key source of male insecurity—not playing on the high school football team. Some men may never overcome this "shortcoming" no matter how famous and admired they become.

Obama on BuzzFeed: Selfie Sticks & Health Insurance

Obama's BuzzFeed video 'Things Everybody Does but Doesn’t Talk About' shows him mugging about, taking selfies and playing air basketball to get young people to visit HealthCare.gov. For leaders, there is a difficult balance between what’s human and relatable and what engenders confidence. How important is that balance?

Why We Need Fantasy

What exactly do we get out of watching romantic relationships on television?

Brian Williams Misremembers

Could America's most trusted news anchor be a pathological liar?

Who's Telling The Truth?

By Russ Gerber on February 13, 2015 in Our Health
What will be your impact on the moral atmosphere?

Joni Mitchell on New York Magazine: Is The Photo Disturbing?

I hope to see my idols looking and sounding as if they are enjoying themselves as they reach the season of harvest (not so very far away from any of us). That's what I long for but very rarely see.

When Lying Is Foolish

By Stephen Greenspan Ph.D. on February 12, 2015 in Incompetence
Brian Williams is a formerly respected newsman who went from one of the most trusted, to one of the least trusted, people in America, in the aftermath of an admission that he has repeatedly told a false story about his exposure to danger while covering the War in Iraq.A four-factor model of "foolish action" is used to partially explain why Williams did what he did.

The Truth About False Memories

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on February 12, 2015 in Good Thinking
Implanting false memories in people is not as easy as we've been led to believe.

We Are Brian Williams

Imagine Brian Williams saying "I tried to feel good about myself but never felt good enough. I constantly criticized myself. I inflated who I was hoping that somehow the reflection back from my audience would overcome my inner diminishment. Now I see that it never did and it never can."

The Flash and the Nonexistent Standard DID Med Mix

The CW's television series "The Flash" has featured a recurring character called Firestorm the "Nuclear Man" who is two different people merged together into one body. To treat the chaos in this mix of men, scientists give him a mix of medications that is supposedly standard treatment for dissociative identity disorder. No such standard exists.

The Catch-Phrase Technique

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on February 11, 2015 in A Sideways View
People often won't tell you what really motivates them. Many can't tell you because they do not have insight into their motives. Over the years, psychologist have tried to invent simple and efficient techniques that assess what people really think. One such is the catch-phrase technique.

Attempt to Redirect Dog Evolution Falls Flat

By Mark Derr on February 10, 2015 in Dog's Best Friend
Researchers' claims that dogs evolved fewer than 10,000 years ago are at odds with current archaeological and genetic evidence. They are also grounded in the belief that wolves and humans are natural enemies. They are not.

Understanding PTSD, TBI, Suicide and Student Veteran Success

Research shows that the transition from the intensity of military life to a more independent civilian life can be overwhelming. Recognizing and understanding special symptoms supports the important objective of increasing the success of many veteran students on campus. It is important to share this information about the needs of student veterans.

Mission to Meet our Makers: A Review of Prometheus, Part 1

By Kyle D Killian Ph.D. on February 08, 2015 in Intersections
Being human: Michael Fassbender's David grasping our place in the universe.