Essential Reads

Meet Danielle Meitiv: Fighting for Her Kids’ Rights

She’s accused of child neglect for allowing her children some freedom.

A Meditation on How Moral Injuries Heal

Why are soldiers vulnerable to moral injury?

A Strength-Based Approach Helps Children

Learn to ask "What’s Right" instead of "What’s Wrong"

The APA and Guantanamo: Actions, Not Words

Yet again the American Psychological Association fails to honor its commitments.

Recent Posts on Intelligence

The Hand that Rocks the Cradle Rules—But Whose Hand Is It?

The history of the nature/nurture controversy reveals fraud on the nurture side and developments in our view of nature that the imprinted brain theory readily explains.

Putting the Happiness Back in “Young and Happy”

By Ran Zilca on April 17, 2015 in Confessions of a Techie
Happiness is a by-product of the pursuit of success, rather than successful accomplishments. Individuals who are actively engaged in the pursuit of goals that are meaningful to them, experience a range of positive emotions and become happier.

God, Humans, and the 20th Century

By Phil Zuckerman Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in The Secular Life
More humans died from diarrhea than all genocides combined.

What Makes Us Tick?

They met in a airport because of a book that one of them was reading, the same the other had recently read. The conversation was so stimulating that they decided to continue it online and share it with their readers. They both believe this will be the first of an endless series of talks about the subject—what makes people tick—that tickles them the most.

When Your Four Year Old Hits Your Two Year Old: a Script

Rewards and punishment don't usually stop the hitting, because they don't help kids with the underlying feelings, or teach them a better way to solve the problem that caused the hitting. When things do go wrong, we want them to find a way to repair the damage they've done to their relationship.

The New Sexual Revolution Is the Sexual Healing Movement

The entire sexual recovery movement and growing number of therapists and centers devoted to sexual healing is at the forefront of a new wave of sexual liberation.

Add Humor to Your Job and Boost Your Career

Take the brave step of experimenting with more well-placed humor at your job. By going outside your normal comfort zone with some easy-to-follow tips, you may develop a much more appealing work environment for yourself, and advance your career.

Curiosity: The Heart of Lifelong Learning

What makes children want to learn? Curious children often spend a great deal of time reading and acquiring knowledge because they sense a gap between what they know and what they want to know—not because they are motivated by grades.

Newsflashes from Emotion Science

A few reflections on the themes that emerged from the second annual meeting of the Society for Affective Science, a new society dedicated to understanding our emotional lives.

'The Eureka Factor' and Your Creative Brain

By Jeffrey Davis M.A. on April 13, 2015 in Tracking Wonder
A creative insight can be as small as landing on an angle for a blog post or as big as discovering a fresh angle for a new book or business launch. The moment you gain such an insight flashes like lightning – and vanishes like lightning. Can you become aware of such moments? And can you replicate them?

8 Ways a Teacher Is Like a Leader

When most people think of a leader, archetypes often include the president of a country, the boss of a company, or a general in the military. But can a teacher be equated to a leader?

How To Change Your Life

By Sheila Kohler on April 12, 2015 in Dreaming for Freud
Change, which is so difficult to achieve in life and to portray in literature is often brought about by a catalyst, a stranger, who comes into our lives and makes us see ourselves in a different and perhaps more truthful light.

Show Me The Money!

By Renee Garfinkel Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in Time Out
I love money. I love everything about it. I bought some pretty good stuff. Got me a $300 pair of socks. Got a fur sink. An electric dog polisher. A gasoline powered turtleneck sweater. And, of course, I bought some dumb stuff, too. –Steve Martin

The Psychology of Imprinting

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in A Sideways View
There are fascinating stories of how animals get attached to those of a quite different species because of critical period imprinting. Can this process begin to help us understand why we are attracted to very different kinds of people?

Faulty Reporting on ADHD

By Christopher Lane Ph.D. on April 11, 2015 in Side Effects
Newspaper of record criticized for its tardy response to overmedicalization.

Meet Danielle Meitiv: Fighting for Her Kids’ Rights

By Peter Gray on April 11, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
Danielle and Alexander Meitiv have been giving their children some of the same freedom that they themselves enjoyed as children, in a world that is safer than the one in which they grew up. As a consequence, they have been visited by police, and the county Child Protective Services have threatened to take their children away. Here is my interview with Danielle.

A Meditation on How Moral Injuries Heal

By Nancy Sherman Ph.D. on April 09, 2015 in Afterwar
Many soldiers don't easily volunteer the word "guilt." They'll instead choose "fault" and "responsibility."

Making the Most of Your Charitable Giving

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in How To Do Life
Most people work hard for the money they give to charity, but that money often doesn't do as much good as it could.

John Joseph Shows Us Why Healthy Living Is Pure Hardcore

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 08, 2015 in Brick by Brick
The Cro-Mags' John Joseph shows us that coping with difficult situations can be hard, but healthy living is the ultimate strategy.

The Zen of Love

What propels a person to leave the beaten path and try something new? We seem to be predetermined by our early experiences, especially when it comes to abuse and neglect. Yet, some people free themselves of their conditioning and leap into something they have never encountered: love. Little do we comprehend when it comes to leaps, but what we know may just be a good start.

We Break Our Own Hearts

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on April 07, 2015 in Obesely Speaking
Our perception is our worst enemy in love and addictive behaviors.

A Strength-Based Approach Helps Children

The positive psychology movement has started to ask "what is healthy," "what is working," and "what are a child’s strengths" as central—and often more important—than what is wrong or what disorder or illness does a child have... and this can change lives.

The Four Types of Attraction

By Jen Kim on April 07, 2015 in Valley Girl With a Brain
You know the story: Boy meets girl. Boy falls in love with girl. Boy and girl have their happily ever after—well at least those relationships that don't end in divorce do. Every part makes sense except for boy falls in love with girl. Why her? Why not another girl? The answer is simple: Attraction. Naturally my next question is: What makes someone attractive?

Vitamania! 15 Vital Facts About the Vitamins We Love

By Meg Selig on April 07, 2015 in Changepower
Are you a "vitamaniac?" 15 vital facts about vitamins and supplements, plus 5 questions to ask yourself before you take a vitamin or other supplement.

Do We Overeat Because of Poor Self-Control?

We know how to stop eating in a literal sense. We just don’t know how to think about overeating in a way that motivates us to stop.

The APA and Guantanamo: Actions, Not Words

By Roy Eidelson Ph.D. on April 07, 2015 in Dangerous Ideas
APA leaders have an abysmal track record when it comes to meaningful action that runs counter to the Pentagon’s own policies on detention and interrogation operations. Time and again in these situations, the APA has trumpeted its commitment to psychology’s do-no-harm ethics but then retreated into the shadows when those principled words required principled actions.

How to Deal with Angry Employees

By Kerry Patterson on April 06, 2015 in Crucial Conversations
In today’s “enlightened” organizations it’s generally considered uncouth to blow a gasket at work, so today’s version of work-place anger often comes in the form of repressed rage masked as raging sarcasm, or possibly a hostile glance, or maybe the ever-favorite thinly veiled threat.

The Ethics of Financial Accounting

At first it seems obvious that manipulating performance measures is unethical: teachers teaching to the test, managers manipulating earnings upward to sell its shares at a high price, and so forth. But things are more subtle than they seem!

8 Tips to Help Your Distractible Child Succeed

Learn these eight ways to coach your distractible child to success.