Integrative Medicine Essential Reads

Why Do People Think Animals Make Good Therapists?

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on October 16, 2017 in Animals and Us
Public interest in animal assisted therapy has grown by leaps and bounds. Yale University researchers examine the reason for its appeal.

Is Mindfulness Being Mindlessly Overhyped? Experts Say "Yes"

By Christopher Bergland on October 10, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
"Mindfulness" needs a clearer definition, more rigorous clinical research, and less media hype—according to an urgent call-to-action by 15 experts from over a dozen universities.

The Hidden Effects of Respiratory Diseases

Anxiety, depression, and PTSD are more common in people that have lung diseases like COPD and asthma.

Inositol and Choline in Mental Health Care

Are you curious about inositol, choline and other B vitamins in mental health care? Emerging findings suggest these vitamins may reduce symptoms of depressed mood and anxiety.

B Vitamins Play Important Roles in Mental Health Care

Are you curious about the role of vitamin supplementation in mental health? B vitamins may help reduce symptoms of alcohol abuse, depressed mood, cognitive impairment and dementia.

Trends in the Treatment of Psychiatric Illnesses

The delivery of mental health care is changing in response to increased recognition of mental illness together with a decrease in the number of practicing psychiatrists.

Infant Gut Microbiome May Influence Cognitive Development

In the past month, two pioneering human studies have revealed fresh clues on how various colonies of gut microbiome influence brain function and cognitive development.

New App Offers Self Help Skills for Fertility Challenges

By Joann P. Galst Ph.D. on July 02, 2017 in Fertility Factor
Try this new app to help you cope with an infertility diagnosis or treatment at any time of day or night.

What Happens When Partners Fight Chronic Pain Together?

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on June 19, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
When one partner battles chronic pain, both partners suffer. A new treatment program offers hope—and lessons that can strengthen any relationship.

At Last the Government Is Recognizing Who Owns Your Health

By Peter Edelstein M.D. on June 06, 2017 in Patient Power
What's more personal than your own individual genetic identification? A recent FDA decision on genetic tests represents a major shift in who truly owns your health: You.

How Common Is PTSD In Primary Care Settings?

New data suggests that PTSD is common in primary care settings. Are patients getting the attention they need for this condition?

Diaphragmatic Breathing Exercises and Your Vagus Nerve

Diaphragmatic breathing is one of the easiest ways to engage your vagus nerve and create a "relaxation response" that counters the panic and anxiety of fight-or-flight responses.

Privatizing Mental Health Has Led to "Insane Consequences"

By Allen J Frances M.D. on May 02, 2017 in Saving Normal
There is no worse place to have a severe mental illness than the United States. A new book explains why and offers solutions.

To Affirm or Not Affirm?

By Leena S. Guptha DO on April 25, 2017 in Embodied Wellness
Struggling with negative thoughts? Use self-affirmations to rewrite the subconscious mind and start thinking positively!

Is Yoga an Effective Antidepressant?

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on April 14, 2017 in Minding the Body
Yoga contains at least four “active ingredients” that could help it work as an antidepressant, says yoga researcher and integrative psychiatrist Dr. Sudha Prathikanti.

Let’s Face It: Medicaid Is the Healthcare We All Want

By David J Ley Ph.D. on March 28, 2017 in Women Who Stray
Believe it or not, if you have commercial health insurance, you're the unlucky one. Medicaid provides people in poverty healthcare that you only wish you could afford.

Goals of Hair

Do you want to be YOU, right up until the end?

If You Want to Live Longer, Get a Dog

New data shows that pet ownership can increase the longevity of people with health risk issues.

Bringing Down the Cost of Healthcare

By Kathryn Seifert Ph.D. on March 21, 2017 in Stop The Cycle
There are 3 effective ways to bring down to cost of healthcare without reducing quality or outcomes. These include prevention, early treatment and integrated care.

Gut Check

While you sit on your tuffet; how does your inner garden grow?

6 Tips for Determining If a Doc-in-the-Box Is Right for You

By Peter A. Ubel M.D. on March 20, 2017 in Critical Decisions
Consumers should keep these 6 tips in mind so they make better use of such clinics.

The Morality of Monetary Motivation

By Peter A. Ubel M.D. on March 14, 2017 in Scientocracy
In a perfect world, we would not need to reward anyone for taking their kid to the doctor. In the imperfect world we live in, such rewards are far better than the alternative.

Regular Aerobic Exercise in Midlife Protects the Aging Brain

By Christopher Bergland on February 24, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Regular aerobic exercise benefits the brain in surprising ways. New research suggests that regular aerobic exercise in midlife can optimize blood flow networks as the brain ages.

Neglecting Mental Health in Cancer Treatment

Do your doctors check up on your mental health? This is why they should.
Psychological Science

Hugs, Tweets, and Physician Reimbursement

By Peter A. Ubel M.D. on February 16, 2017 in Scientocracy
As for those of us not in the healthcare reimbursement business, we should focus our energy on hugging people we care about. And minding our tweets.

New Research Finds Mindfulness Reduces Worry

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on February 09, 2017 in Urban Survival
What mindfulness exercise helps with persistent worry and negative thoughts? Research suggest you try this technique to reduce how much you worry.

Politics and Poison: Casualties of Fake News

The FDA warns that some natural remedies contain poison. Meanwhile partisan rhetoric poisons the body politic.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Holds Promise for Treating Addiction

By Christopher Bergland on January 24, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Vagus nerve stimulation can reduce cravings and may offer a radical new way to break the cycle of addictive behaviors, according to early findings from a preclinical study.

30 Minutes of Daily Activity May Help Slow Chromosomal Aging

By Christopher Bergland on January 20, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A first-of-its-kind study reports that 30 minutes of daily physical activity may offset the chromosomal impact of too much sitting, which is associated with accelerated aging.

Getting Good Advice From Your Physician

By Peter A. Ubel M.D. on January 19, 2017 in Critical Decisions
Patients should make sure physicians understand their goals well enough to help them make the right choices.