Essential Reads

Putting Humanity and the Humanities Back Into Medicine

Treat the patient, not the lab test.

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

Nurturing college students for success, not dependency

5 Tips for a More Relaxing Urban Walk

How to make a sidewalk stroll more relaxing and refreshing

5 Ways to Break Bad News without Actually Lying

There’s good news about the best way to break bad news

Recent Posts on Health

Let's talk about mental health

It is time to break the silence about mental illness and start the conversation about mental health. It is time to be #StrongerTogether.

How to Boost Your Self-Esteem? Try Hitting the Weight Room

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on July 28, 2015 in The Sports Mind
New research shows that physically stronger men have higher self-esteem.

Steps to Take Today for Better Brain Health Tomorrow

You may be taking proactive steps to support your body’s health, but are you taking similar steps to sustain your brain? When it comes to supporting brain health, the old adage is true: it’s better than never. There’s no time like the present to start supporting your brain.

Why I Tossed the Gummy Vitamins

By Zanthe Taylor M.F.A. on July 28, 2015 in A Million Meals
Parents make most, if not all, food and health choices for our young children: the pressure of that constant decision-making, plus our primal drive to ensure they survive and thrive, creates a potent stew of emotions that makes us particularly vulnerable both to magical thinking about food and to those who exploit it.

13 Steps to Better Relationships...And Peace of Mind

By Meg Selig on July 28, 2015 in Changepower
You can use mindfulness techniques to create a more peaceful mind. But good social relationships may be just as important.

Why Your View of the Future Can Make You Depressed

Most people assume that if you're depressed, that colors your view of your future. New research turns that thinking on its head, showing that, for many, if your view of your future is negative to begin with, that can actually make you depressed. The flip side is that a positive view of your future stimulates greater mental health.

Putting Humanity and the Humanities Back Into Medicine

By Allen J Frances M.D. on July 28, 2015 in Saving Normal
The relationship between medical art and science is changing rapidly, with the science now overwhelming the art. Doctors more and more function like technicians, not healers. A knowledge of the humanities is crucial if doctors are to treat patients, not lab tests.

Wilderness Therapy

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on July 27, 2015 in Minority Report
Why getting outdoors may be the best medicine for your psychological health. It can not only free you from your daily world of connection but also test you psychologically as you push yourself in your various pursuits.

Emotions, Culture, and Heart Disease

The relationship between expressing hostility and heart disease is a strong candidate for a psychological universal. Or is it?

Are You Fully Charged? 5 Ways to Energize Your Work & Life

A survey of 10,000 people revealed that only 11% responded "yes" when asked, "Did you have a great deal of energy yesterday?"

Do “Autism Parents” Face Increased Stigma for Mental Health?

Despite the fact that mental health is centrally tied to our overall well-being, parents of children with autism may find themselves not only combating the general public’s shared stigma related to mental illness and therapeutic services, but must also contend with additional challenges in overcoming the stigmatization of supporting their own psychological needs.

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

How can concerned parents help today's college students become healthier, more successful young adults?

9 Cancer-Fighting Foods and Beverages

Find out how nutrition disarms cancer cells at the level of DNA.

Resolving the “Conscientiousness Paradox”

Conscientious individuals generally have good outcomes, but countries with high national levels of conscientiousness generally have poorer levels of human development. What does this apparent "conscientiousness paradox" mean?

Cheating Yourself? I Hear the Advice, I Do What I Want

Real behaviour change is not about willpower, or stages of change, but about satisfying wants and dealing with needs along the way.......it is about coherence at all levels of the person......

Changing Clocks Causes Cancer?

Time rules life. Does disrupting inner body clocks cause cancer?

Is It True That Your Physical Pain Is In Your Mind?

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on July 25, 2015 in Off the Couch
“I think there’s something wrong,” Marjorie said. “I feel like I have a urinary tract infection all the time. But the doctor can’t find anything the matter. He says I have an anxiety disorder." A week later, tests showed that she had a UTI. Why hadn't the doctor picked it up before?

5 Tips for a More Relaxing Urban Walk

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on July 25, 2015 in Minding the Body
A walk down city streets is generally less calming than a nature hike. But these tips can make an urban walk more relaxing and refreshing.

5 Ways to Break Bad News without Actually Lying

Very few, if any, of us truly enjoys being the bearer of bad news. If you have no choice but to be that messenger, there are ways to get the job done with a minimum of damaged feelings. These 5 strategies will help you figure out how to make the best out of some of life’s unpleasant situations.

Eating at Night Disrupts Sleep

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on July 24, 2015 in Sleep Newzzz
When you’re considering the food choices you make in order to support your health, keep in mind that you’re also influencing how well you sleep—and that it’s not just what you eat, but when, that may matter.

What Matters More? Size or Quality of Your Social Network

What's more important for your health, happiness, and well-being—the quantity or quality of your social network?

Leveraging the Biopsychosocial Model

The biopsychosocial model is a metatheory and clinical philosophy; however, are we leveraging its power?

The Quicksand of Self-deception: The Nocebo Effect

The placebo effect is a well-known phenomenon. Less well-known is the nocebo effect, placebo’s “evil twin.” Can physicians cause more harm than good when they give their patients too much information about a potential medication or therapeutic treatment, including those for weight-related disorders? What are the ethical considerations involved in withholding information?

Republicans, Rape, God, and Evolution

By Hector A Garcia Psy.D. on July 23, 2015 in Alpha God
What is the ultimate relationship between our evolved psychology and conservative views on female sexuality?

Why Female Celebrities Get Stuck in Public Feuds

By Seth Meyers Psy.D. on July 23, 2015 in Insight Is 20/20
Three music superstars - Nicki Minaj, Taylor Swift and Katy Perry - recently acted out what happens on playgrounds between females far and wide. Why do they do it? It has to do with what's called "relational aggression."

4 Mental Health Disorders That May Thrive on Loneliness

By Kira Asatryan on July 23, 2015 in The Art of Closeness
It's possible you're not mentally ill. You're just lonely.

Severe Migraine: Finding Answers in the Mind, Not in Pills

There are 45 million Americans with migraine and about 10% of those have frequent and severe headaches that are unresponsive to medications and other treatments. Most doctors would describe migraine as a genetic disorder, however this blog presents a different view. A patient with severe migraines is presented and her cure lay in her willingness to reappraise her life.

Your Brain and Health in Nature: Rewilding Is Good For Us

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on July 23, 2015 in Animal Emotions
Two new studies show how walking in nature changes the brain and how trees can make people healthier including cardio-metabolic conditions. For those whose frenetic lives leave little time for getting outside, this is good news. And, there don't appear to be any downsides to taking a short break and getting out in nature and rewilding our hearts.

Trauma Workers At Risk for Compassion Fatigue

Those who experience compassion fatigue are often more caring of their clients, and more vulnerable to the emotional pain of others. There are, however, ways to overcome compassion fatigue.

Why Lisa Lampanelli is a ‘Spiritual Gangster’

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 23, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Lisa Lampanelli shares how helping others can help develop a strong self-concept.