Happiness Essential Reads

In Pursuit of Happiness: Why Pain Helps Us Feel Pleasure

By Brock Bastian Ph.D. on June 22, 2017 in The Other Side
Is happiness just about the good times? Do painful experiences only make us unhappy? Here is new research on why our painful experiences are in fact necessary for happiness.

Anxiety as Depression Waiting to Happen

Why does anxiety often lead to depression, and even create further anxiety? This article provides an answer, and discusses a key factor in overcoming the comorbidity.

The 5 Defense Mechanisms That Can Sabotage Your Relationship

Defense mechanisms are a common way to manage anxiety, but they can get in the way of your close relationships. New research shows how to make your defense mechanisms work for you.
Joshua Ness/Unsplash

Why We Should Be Having More Meaningful Conversations

Meaningful conversation is linked to happiness? Introverts got it right.

How Hobbies Impact Your Head and Your Heart

Are you looking to feel happier, younger and smarter? An hour a day could make all the difference.
Ezra Jeffrey

A Simple Five Step Process for Achieving Daily Happiness

Happiness is a state of mind—one that doesn’t stick around for 24 hours a day. It comes and goes, always making you aware of its presence.
Clair Brown

What Makes People Happy?

By Clair Brown, Ph.D. on June 14, 2017 in Buddhist Economics
You can be happy! Buddhist economics shows how real happiness is built upon creating a meaningful life. Chasing after money and never-ending desires brings fleeting happiness.

For a Profound Sense of Meaning in Life, Have Sex

By Todd B. Kashdan Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in Curious?
How central is sexuality to the development of well-being? New research untangles the association between sexuality and various dimensions of well-being.

What Obesity and Interpersonal Conflict Have in Common

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in The Squeaky Wheel
Our most basic physical activity impacts our mind in surprising ways.
Shoes/Pixaby

What's Your Passion?

By Diana Raab PhD on June 12, 2017 in The Empowerment Diary
Do you feel that in your personal and professional life that you are busy doing too many things you don't like to do? Maybe you need a reminder of how to tap into your passions.

Can Pet Crickets Improve the Well-being of the Elderly?

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on June 12, 2017 in Animals and Us
A high quality randomized control study finds that caring for pet crickets has a surprisingly positive impact on the well-being of elderly people.

Why Should We Slow Down? The Lost Art of Patience

Technology allows us to get things done quickly, and we love our smartphones. But slowing down might make you happier and healthier, and also more productive in the long run.

What Perks and Benefits Do Employees Want Most?

By Victor Lipman on June 10, 2017 in Mind of the Manager
A new survey on summer perks and benefits finds significant mismatches between employee desires and company offerings.

Are Young Women With Older Men Looking for a Daddy?

Relationships with a significant age gap almost always trigger raised eyebrows. Research helps to determine whether those raised eyebrows are justified.

Material Girl, Miserable Girl

By Sarah C. Newcomb Ph.D. on June 06, 2017 in Loaded
People who place a high importance on material wealth report lower quality of life in physical, social, emotional, and professional domains.

Why Some People Just Have Difficult Relationships

You may regard yourself as pretty easy-going, so why are some people in your life so very hard to get along with? New research shows why the difficult are so difficult.

The Lord of the Wedding Ring: J.R.R. Tolkien’s True Love

Tolkien's new book, Beren and Luthien is coming out decades after the author’s death, but it tells a tale close to his heart.

Are You Stressed Or Upset?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on June 05, 2017 in Your Wise Brain
We move back and forth between Green and Red, which our ancestors evolved to survive and pass on to us in their genes.

When Grit Goes Wrong and What to Do Instead

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on May 30, 2017 in Feeling It
Talented people often fall for an idea that ends up harming their success in the long run - here's the science of how to avoid it (and become happier to boot).

What Erroneous Beliefs Do You Hold about Resilience?

By Todd B. Kashdan Ph.D. on May 30, 2017 in Curious?
We only learn about what makes people resilient and how to help people become more resilient with sufficient scientific theories and methodologies. Read this course correction.

What's Changing?

By Rick Hanson Ph.D. on May 29, 2017 in Your Wise Brain
Nothing about opening to the changing nature of both internal experiences and external conditions means that we should pursue wholesome ends and means any less wholeheartedly.

Being Sweet on Your Fitbit

When your Fitbit becomes part of your identity, you’re on the right path to fitness, weight loss, and eternal bliss.

The Five Best Ways to Ruin an Apology

Here's how to de-code those relationship-busting apologies in love and work.

The Best Way to Handle a Narcissist Is to Use Some Extra TLC

When you think of people high in narcissism, low self-esteem hardly comes to mind as part of the picture. New research shows that handling them involves some extra TLC.

16-Year Study: Surprising Findings about Marriage and Health

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on May 27, 2017 in Living Single
In a 16-year study, more than 11,000 people were followed as they married and divorced. Here’s what happened to their health, life satisfaction, and depression.

Hassles Are Part of Being Human, Even for Our Ancestors

Being human, with all its messiness, is worth the hassle

Free Health Insurance Makes Kids Resilient

In the debate over health insurance, we’re forgetting that research proves that children with access to health care out-perform children with none.

The Four Qualities It Takes to Become a High Flyer

The highly successful in work, if not life, seem to share 4 common personality traits according to new research on the qualities that can position you to fly high and succeed.

The Wisdom of "It's Not My Fault"

When we are not caught in self-blame, we are free to love this life. Opening to the possibility of "It’s not my fault" creates space for deep inner freedom.
T. Mairunteregger

Seligman on Tour

Is "prospection" the newest and holiest of grails in psychology? Seligman: "Yes." We: "No."