Essential Reads

The Psychology of Religion

By Andy Tix Ph.D. on December 14, 2017 in The Pursuit of Peace
What explains why some individuals are more religious than others? Scientists interested in the psychology of religion seek answers.

Compared to Humans, How Good Is a Dog's Visual Acuity?

By Stanley Coren PhD., DSc, FRSC on December 14, 2017 in Canine Corner
Recent data shows that the visual acuity of humans is several times better than that of dogs under most light conditions.

Cultural Group Selection

By Glenn C. Altschuler Ph.D. on December 14, 2017 in This Is America
In addition to genetic differences and individual learning, a process called cultural group selection may help explain the ecological success of human beings.

Genetic Exoneration

Can we improve on how we help cancer patients and their families learn about their risk for cancer? New test says "Yes. Better than ever."

More Posts on Genetics

The Dark Age of Tetrachromacy Research

By Maureen Seaberg on December 17, 2017 in Sensorium
Why is tetrachromacy functionality testing so stalled?

Untangling the Brain’s Complexity

By Jeffrey Borenstein, M.D. on December 11, 2017 in Brain and Behavior
Study shows how to tell which neurons are which.
Judy Tsafrir MD

MTHFR, Methylation and Histamine in Psychiatric Conditions

By Judy Tsafrir M.D. on November 22, 2017 in Holistic Psychiatry
The MTHFR mutation does not mean that you need to take methyl folate. This common approach can contribute to worsening psychiatric symptoms as well as increase the risk of cancer.

Are Dogs Insanely Friendly Because of Their Genetics?

By Stanley Coren PhD., DSc, FRSC on November 16, 2017 in Canine Corner
A genetic abnormality which causes extreme friendliness in people also causes the friendliness we observe in dogs.

Masturbation: Self-Abuse or Biological Necessity?

By Robert D. Martin Ph.D. on November 16, 2017 in How We Do It
Masturbation has slowly lost its evil reputation from previous centuries. Human studies and primate research both indicate that it brings benefits rather than health risks.
pixabay at pexels

Humanity Goes Viral

By Matthew J. Edlund M.D. on November 09, 2017 in The Power of Rest
Viruses and sociopaths have lots in common.

Too Many Synaptic Connections in Cerebellum Creates Problems

By Christopher Bergland on November 04, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Contrary to popular belief, a growing pile of research shows that too many synaptic connections can impede brain function.
(Band of Brothers, Sterling Farms Golf Course, Stamford CT., standing as one. Greg O’Brien is second from right.)

Standing as One in Support of Alzheimer's

By Greg O'Brien on October 30, 2017 in On Pluto
If there ever were a bipartisan issue to stand on today, it is for a cure for Alzheimer’s, to drive a knife through this demon. We are all at risk, but we are not alone.

Our Curious Fascination With Serial Killers

By Scott A. Bonn Ph.D. on October 23, 2017 in Wicked Deeds
Serial killers are larger-than-life popular culture celebrities due to the efforts of law enforcement authorities and the media which feed the public’s appetite for the macabre.

Collective Intelligence in the Holocene: 7

By Michael Hogan Ph.D. on October 13, 2017 in In One Lifespan
Notwithstanding the uniqueness of human beings, a focus on the broadest timescale of analysis reminds us that evolution unites Homo sapiens with all other living systems.

Nature Versus Nurture: Where We Are in 2017

A lot has changed in our understanding of the timeless nature-nurture debate. Find out where we are now.

How Microbes In Our Gut Can Affect Our Emotions

Gene-regulating molecules in the brain are under the influence.

Depression and Mood Disorders

Most of us have learned to cope with mood swings but at any one time almost 10 percent of the U.S. adult population experience depression. Look for the signs and seek help.

Mitochondria and Mood

By Peter Bongiorno ND, LAc on September 29, 2017 in Inner Source
What are the energy packs of your cells, and could these be the underlying cause of mental health problems?

Using Big Data to Study Psychology

By Art Markman Ph.D. on September 28, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
There is a lot of discussion about the value of big data for companies. Can big data help science as well?

Why You Hate Exercise

By Temma Ehrenfeld on September 26, 2017 in Open Gently
If you hate exercise, look harder for ways to make it pleasant--get out in sunshine or find a buddy.

Are Your Food Cravings Genetic?

By Sunny Sea Gold on September 07, 2017 in Weighty Truths
Could our DNA drive us to naturally eat more bread, butter, or chocolate? It sure looks that way.

An "Intelligence Pill"

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on September 05, 2017 in How To Do Life
One of humankind's most world-improving goals.

Is Vulnerability to Stress Coded in Our Genes?

By Emily Deans M.D. on September 04, 2017 in Evolutionary Psychiatry
The relationship between stress and depression is complicated, but some of it is coded into our genes.

Does Gut Microbiome Influence Mindset and Mental Toughness?

By Christopher Bergland on August 20, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Harvard scientists have pinpointed specific gut microbiome linked to peak athletic performance. Someday soon, these findings could be used to benefit people from all walks of life.

RIP Self-Taming Dump-Divers

By Mark Derr on August 08, 2017 in Dog's Best Friend
A new research papers argues that hypersociability is tied to domestication of dogs.

Blinded with Science!

By John Staddon, Ph.D. on August 04, 2017 in Adaptive Behavior
Hearing speech you don't like can cause physical injury. Really?

Have Dogs Specifically Evolved to Eat Bread and Pasta?

Do dogs benefit from a raw meat diet? While wolves are genetically programmed to eat meat, dogs have genes that allow them to digest carbohydrates.

Get the Science Right!

What popular books get wrong about human evolution.

Is Genius Inherited?

It is usually assumed that genius is a completely inherited attribute but experimental studies vary. This study shows that strong motivation and inheritance play a critical role.

Why Women Have Affairs

By Martin Graff Ph.D. on July 12, 2017 in Love, Digitally
Engaging in infidelity might increase a female’s perceptions of her self-esteem.

What It Means to Be a Human

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on June 29, 2017 in The Human Beast
From Darwin onwards, scholars struggled to define our species. There are two leading theories, but neither seems workable.

Do You Mate Like a Cavewoman?

By Donna Barstow on June 26, 2017 in Ink Blots Cartoons
If you've never used Darwin in your dating practices before, you're missing out. Cavewomen had multiple orgasms without even trying.

Sleep, Genetic Conflict, and Human Longevity

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on June 25, 2017 in Dream Catcher
Non-optimal sleep durations carry a differential cost for males because too little or too much sleep is associated with defective sperm quality and shorter telomere lengths.

Immortality

By Mario D Garrett Ph.D. on June 25, 2017 in iAge
The question is whether immortality is even possible...