Essential Reads

Make Up or Break Up? 5 Ways Couples Reconcile After a Fight

New research has identified what men and women think are the most effective tactics used by couples to reconcile after a conflict.

Does Testosterone Really Just Make Men Aggressive?

The conventional wisdom about testosterone is that it drives aggressiveness and competition. But new research reveals that social rank is also important.

Secrets of Sexual Attraction

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on July 12, 2017 in The Human Beast
The problem of how different tastes in physical attraction emerge is surprisingly complex. Influences range from brain biology to fashions.

Can We Trust What Men and Women Reveal on Sex Surveys?

Sex surveys have limitations, but can be useful if administered correctly.

More Posts on Evolutionary Psychology

Hypotheses About Gender Imbalance in Expressing Opinions

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on July 21, 2017 in Cui Bono
Why are more opinion letters published in the NYT written by male authors? I explore both hypotheses about the answer to this question and how theories determine our hypotheses.

Fatal Attraction

By R. Douglas Fields Ph.D. on July 20, 2017 in The New Brain
An intriguing link has been identified between unconventional sexual behavior and a common parasite, which is acquired from cats.

How Good Is a Dog's Ability to Remember People?

There are suggestions that dogs can remember and may recognize particular people even after years of separation.

Real Reasons for Sex Before Marriage

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on July 19, 2017 in The Human Beast
More people today are sexually active before marriage than ever before. The true reasons are practical and have little to do with changing belief systems.

Looking for Social Behavior?

An encounter with a species of beetles that pair bonds, communicates with their offspring through sound, and deals with infanticide threats from other pairs.

Get the Science Right!

What popular books get wrong about human evolution.

Small Acts of Generous Behavior Can Make Your Brain Happier

New research shows that very small amounts of generosity can affect you on a neurobiological level.
RelaxingMusic/Flikr

Mindfulness for Beginners

Mindfulness is all the rage, and with a promise to improve concentration, mood, and energy, reduce stress, improve immune function, and even fight obesity, it should be.

The Power of Total Isolation: Why We Hate Being Alone

By Kevin Bennett on July 12, 2017 in Modern Minds
The pain of extreme isolation results from a conflict between evolved social mechanisms and impersonal modern environments containing built structures that cut us off from others.

The ABC of the Diametric Model, Twenty Years On

Twenty years after it was first published, the diametric model can be seen as a striking co-discovery like so many others in the history of science.

Who Gives a Dog a Command and How It Is Given Matters

Dogs respond differently to hand signals and voice commands, and who is giving the commands also matters.

Large Study Finds Pet Owners Are Different

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on July 03, 2017 in Animals and Us
New research shows pet owners and non-pet owners differ in important ways. Does this explain the positive impact of dogs and cats on human health?

Why You Should Fear Failure

Shame avoidance is a way in which evolution has provided humans with a useful tool to reach desired goals.

Language, Geological Time, and Evolution

Language is one of the most important revolutionary advances of human beings. We will explore language with its individual development and relationship to emotions and cognition.

Like Us, They Kill and Consume. But Could They Save Us?

By Gayil Nalls Ph.D. on June 29, 2017 in Sensoria
Like humans, ants are eusocial and chemical communicators. However, we are just discovering their unique abilities that have cared for the planet for millennia.

What It Means to Be a Human

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on June 29, 2017 in The Human Beast
From Darwin onwards, scholars struggled to define our species. There are two leading theories, but neither seems workable.

Hunter-gatherer Ancestry May Be Why Our Brains Need Exercise

A radical new evolutionary neuroscience theory may explain how our hunter-gatherer ancestors inadvertently hardwired our modern day brains to thrive on everyday physical activity.

How is Meaning in Life Different from Self-Actualization?

Eudaimonic well-being is a fancy term for living a meaningful life. New research examines the different motives behind different kinds of self-fulfillment.

We Live in a Zoo!

Is our current living environment creating physical and emotional problems for us?

Do You Mate Like a Cavewoman?

By Donna Barstow on June 26, 2017 in Ink Blots Cartoons
If you've never used Darwin in your dating practices before, you're missing out. Cavewomen had multiple orgasms without even trying.

A Short History of Love

By Neel Burton M.D. on June 23, 2017 in Hide and Seek
How love became the new religion.

What Older Dads Need To Know

Are geeks taking over the world? The sons of older fathers are more geeky, and do better academically in success-predicting academics. The "Geek Index" helps us study geekiness.

Mind-Body Practices Downregulate Inflammation-Related Genes

A new systematic review of research on mind-body interventions reports that practices such as meditation or yoga can downregulate the genetic expression of inflammatory cytokines.

Baby Care: Baselines for Mental Health

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on June 18, 2017 in Moral Landscapes
For most babies, early experiences are undermining their short- and long-term mental (and physical) health.

Baselines for Babies

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on June 18, 2017 in Moral Landscapes
Authoritative (not authoritarian) parenting might be good for children, but it's bad for babies.

The Psychology of the Bachelor Party

By Neel Burton M.D. on June 16, 2017 in Hide and Seek
What do they mean and why have they become so popular?
wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock

The Art of Choosing a Romantic Partner (Part One)

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on June 14, 2017 in Media Spotlight
Why do we choose the romantic partners that we do? And what shapes the choices we make? New research provides some interesting insights into partner selection.

The Future of the World

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on June 12, 2017 in How To Do Life
A debate between an optimist and a pessimist.

Why Parents May Sacrifice their Own Children

Under certain circumstances, we have inherited a biological tendency to sacrifice ourselves and our children for our kin or social group. Abraham and Isaac's story is illustrative.