Essential Reads

Are Conservatives More Anti-Science Than Liberals?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on August 26, 2016 in Talking Apes
Skepticism about scientific findings depends on your core beliefs, not your level of science literacy.

Psychological and Environmental Aspects of Who We Eat

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on August 26, 2016 in Animal Emotions
"Meat Climate Change: The 2nd Leading Cause of Global Warming" highlights the incredible damage agricultural practices do to our planet and psyches and offers viable solutions.

Unattended Children, Harm, and the Nature of Moral Judgment

New research explains why people are quick to condemn those who leave their children unattended.

Curious About Cuba?

By Marty Babits on August 18, 2016 in The Middle Ground
Cuba will bring you to your senses! Mindfulness and aliveness join hands in the jewel of the Caribbean. Experience the transformation in the island and in yourself.

More Posts on Environment

The Difference Between Japanese and U.S. Use of Emoticons

Why emoticon expressions differ by culture. Understanding why Japanese people and Americans use different emoticons to indicate happiness and sadness.

Proclaiming Your Wabi-Sabi Is a Cathartic Antidote for Shame

By Christopher Bergland on August 27, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
You don't have to be a Zen Buddhist to embrace the power of "wabi-sabi." Publicly acknowledging your imperfections can make you immune to the isolation created by shame.

Homeless, Mentally Ill and Neglected

When the symptoms of mental illness are acute, they affect an individual’s decision-making capacity. Our failure to provide treatment to those in need is discrimination..

Don’t Bee Afraid

By Jeffrey Lockwood Ph.D. on August 26, 2016 in The Infested Mind
Not only are bee stings painful, but they can be deadly—and we all know this! So why would a beekeeper wear shorts and work without a veil?

The Therapeutic Value of Nature

By Dan Mager MSW on August 26, 2016 in Some Assembly Required
Research suggests that spending time in nature can be extremely beneficial, leading to improvements in mood, cognition, and health.

The Joys of Going Off the Map

By Melody Warnick on August 17, 2016 in This Is Where You Belong
Can you navigate from point A to point B without a GPS? Allowing yourself to get distracted might help.

Being Something vs. Doing Something

If the ancient world was over-personalized, than today personal and family life face the threat of becoming ‘professionalized.’

Air Travel and the Speed of Global Warming

Air travel is about time—departure, arrivals, delays, and waiting. But the way we currently travel provides no time to think about how we also live at the speed of global warming

How We Color Our Lives With the Emotions We Desire

By Marianna Pogosyan Ph.D. on August 15, 2016 in Between Cultures
"Ideal affect" offers insights into the complexities of our emotional worlds, our preferences and our behaviors.

The Psychological Roots of Pokémon Go

Pokémon Go scratches some basic psychological itches

Go Wild and Grow Happy, Part 2

What went right in the hunter-gatherer life? We don't have to suffer from depression and anxiety. Here are some simple ways to live a more natural life and re-invite "being here."
L Breuning

Why Winning Feels Good

The facts of our brain’s natural competitiveness have been submerged by a warm and fuzzy view of nature. The truth can help us manage our quirky neurochemical operating system.

Ignoring Social Context in Studies of Borderline Personality

Whether an individual seems to be overly cautious or overly optimistic regarding their expectations of others is determined by experience and learning, not by brain abnormalities.

A Wolf Is a Dog Is a Coyote Is a Jackal Is a Dingo

By Mark Derr on August 09, 2016 in Dog's Best Friend
Coyotes, it turns out, are basically wolves—and so are dogs.

Warming and Cooling With Color

Color has power, and it can be harnessed for good!

On the Malignant Nature of Narcissism

By Stephen A. Diamond Ph.D. on August 07, 2016 in Evil Deeds
Should presidential candidates be required to undergo a psychological evaluation?

A Sort of Revelation

Are the haphazard workings of ‘Chance’, or the purposeful and controlling ‘forces’ of some cosmic ‘Design Intelligence at work in Nature?
John Everett Millais' The Knight Errant of 1870, Wikimedia

Enough With the Trauma Reductionism!

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on August 03, 2016 in Standard Deviations
Psychology as a field has veered too far towards a social constructionist lens, placing too much emphasis on the effects of trauma, especially when it comes to sexuality.

Getting Back to the Source

Be a Chef, not a consumer! Learn to source your food.

Protecting Yourself From Digital Predators

Not all people you digitally communicate with are predators, but all predators use the same communication skills to develop a relationship with you as do sincere people.

Pokémon Go and the Failure of Urban Design

By Colin Ellard Ph.D. on July 31, 2016 in Mind Wandering
Perhaps the popularity of Pokémon Go signals our thirst for interesting urban design.

Unsafe Refuge

The Centers for Disease Control recently reported on the case of a family poisoned in their home after a botched Florida fumigation. It would be reassuring to view this as a fluke

Do You Truly Love Animals?

Do you know how to show your love for animals truly? This article helps illustrate some surprising insights!

Australia to Kill Goats Using Self-Destructing Dingoes

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on July 25, 2016 in Animal Emotions
Australia's plan to kill goats using dingoes implanted with a time-activated poison challenges conservation psychology and anthrozoology as do New Zealand's "management" plans.

Changing the Human Psyche for Living Sustainably

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on July 24, 2016 in Moral Landscapes
Human psychology has moved away from beliefs that promote sustainable living. Thomas Berry identified misunderstandings that have led to the ecological crisis we face.

Why Do Run-Down Schools Trigger Lower Test Scores?

A new study from Cornell University identifies a chain reaction that occurs in run-down schools which results in lower test scores for students from all walks of life.

How Common Is Road Rage?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in Media Spotlight
A new research study released by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety suggests that road rage is far more common than you might think.

5 Good and Bad Ways Nature Impacts Your Emotional Health

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in The Squeaky Wheel
By 2050, 70% of people will live in urban areas. Now consider how powerfully nature affects our minds, brains, and body as illustrated by these recent studies:

Who Is That Masked Man (Or Woman)?

By Peter Edelstein M.D. on July 18, 2016 in Patient Power
All over Asia, I see men and women, young and old, laborers and professionals, wearing surgical masks as they walk, drive, eat, watch movies. So what's up? Should you be masked?

United Nations Harmony with Nature Stresses Justice for All

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on July 17, 2016 in Animal Emotions
The U. N.'s harmony with nature initiative stresses global justice in which societies of humans are viewed as part of a wider community that incorporates animal societies.