Essential Reads

Why Are Crowded City Dwellers Living the Slow Life?

The big city means the fast life, unrestricted sexuality, street gangs, and hordes of uncaring people. Right? Maybe not, according to a recently published series of studies.

Heat Wave Temperatures Make It Tougher to Do the Right Thing

As millions of people endure record-breaking heat waves, a new study reminds us of the psychological impact high temperatures can have on prosocial behaviors.

Pope Francis, Conservation Psychology, Science, and Earth

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in Animal Emotions
The Pope's encyclical letter on care for our common home has many very important ideas that are closely related to conservation psychology, anthrozoology, and the role of science.

The Law of Attraction

By David Dillard-Wright Ph.D. on June 07, 2017 in Boundless
Is the Law of Attraction nonsense? Perhaps it holds a grain of truth.

More Posts on Environment

Superfluidity and the Transcendent Ecstasy of Extreme Sports

A trailblazing new study identifies some common themes that motivate people to push against their limits while transcending everyday states of consciousness through extreme sports.

Our Secret Life in Bathrooms

By Toby Israel Ph.D. on May 10, 2017 in Design on My Mind
The bathroom can conjure up images of birth, of the beginning, of water which we must cross, of water in which we may be purified: The bathroom of the hero/ine's journey.

Litterbugs in Outer Space

Why is space full of human junk? What does it imply for our desire to face new challenges and build new worlds?

What’s Your Anti-Gravity Strategy?

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on May 04, 2017 in Ambigamy
People seek transcendence by many means. Some come bundled with belief in supernatural magic at odds with science. Scientists can do more to help resolve the tension.

A Climate Scientist's Talk at the March for Science

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on May 02, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
A climate scientist speaks at the march for science in a way that acknowledges the limitations to science, and the value of skepticism and alternative views.

Bubblebags and Baggyballs

By Bernard L. De Koven on May 01, 2017 in On Having Fun
Worried about the environment? Here's a way to make playful use of some of our favorite detritus

Bret Stephens: Out Of The Bubble

Pulitzer Prize winning Bret Stephens makes some readers of the New York Times uncomfortable, and some, angry. He says that's his job. But many readers want him fired for his views.

The Modern Millennial Work From Home Mode

Working from home need not conjure dated images of burning dinners and screaming babies while taking conference calls. The millennial approach is about working smarter, not harder.

The Emerging Science of Awe and Its Benefits

By Emma Stone, Ph.D. on April 27, 2017 in Understanding Awe
Move over happiness, there's another emotion that boasts myriad benefits for health, wellbeing and social connectedness

One Philosopher’s Daily Grind

By Hugh Aldersey-Williams on April 26, 2017 in A Curious Mind
How did the day job of one of the greatest of all philosophers influence his ideas?

The Politics of Silence

Excessive noise seriously harms human health and interferes with people’s daily activities at school, at work, at home and during leisure activities.

Agitating for the Environment

One place to take on global environmental stewardship may be your own laundry room. Remarkably, the spotlight now is not on detergents or bleach, but rather on the apparel itself.

Morality: Seeds Must Be Planted Rightly in Early LIfe

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on April 23, 2017 in Moral Landscapes
It’s easy to believe that reasoning is the most important aspect of morality. But it isn't. Morality "goes all the way down" to how well our neurobiological systems work.

An Earth Day Wake-Up Call Delivered Via Hawk

By Shawn M. Burn Ph.D. on April 22, 2017 in Presence of Mind
Earth Day is a good day to consider (or reconsider) your commitment to promoting environmental sustainability.

Please Yell at Me

By Asa Don Brown Ph.D. on April 21, 2017 in Towards Recovery
Have you ever found yourself uncontrollably yelling?

This Earth Day

By The Research Lab on April 20, 2017 in The Fundamentals
When science and politics collide. By Tim Beach, Ph.D.
Yvonne Temal

How Mother Nature Became My Therapy

Escaping into nature can help us recover from our depression and anxiety while simultaneously allowing us to be free. "The mountains are calling and I must go..." -John Muir.

Why Do People Refute Climate Change?

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on April 17, 2017 in ExperiMentations
How can people deny climate change? The evidence is extremely strong, and the danger is clear and present. Research gives clues as to what factors are really at play.

Fallingwater: Where Design, Structure, & Psychology Converge

Asked to describe Fallingwater in one word, its owner replied, "Romance." Frank Lloyd Wright used design and structure to evoke psychological reactions.
"Emotion Sensation," Frank John Ninivaggi, oil, 2006

Emotions as Our Mother Tongue

We strive for competency. We want a better quality of life. To achieve this, our second language, thought, not only needs but demands its mother language—emotion.

Aphrodite and Dionysus

Lack of or a low sexual desire is the most common sexual challenge, about which physicians hear numerous complaints.

Diagnoses: Harmful or Helpful?

Mental illness can tell us what's wrong with a person, with parenting, with a culture, and with society. It's bio/psycho/social. Let's learn fully about ourselves from it.

The Nature of a Dog's Eye Can Make Problem-Solving Difficult

Dogs have limited visual abilities when compared to humans, and this may make solving certain problems difficult.

Estrogen Promise

By Robert J King Ph.D. on April 11, 2017 in Hive Mind
Have the rumors of the death of testosterone been somewhat exaggerated? In a word: Yes.

Victim of Biology and Circumstance?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 10, 2017 in Memory Medic
People have underestimated their capacity to sculpt their own brains, attitudes, and behavior by controlling experiences that affect gene expression.

The Power of Awe: "A Star Is Born" Images and the Small Self

New mind-blowing photographs of a star being born 500 years ago reaffirm the "awesome" power of nature to promote self-transcendence, the small self, and prosocial behaviors.

Can Religious Identity Inspire Pro-Environmental Action?

Religious identity can shape worldviews, build community, and provide networks of communication. So why is it so hard to motivate adherents to take pro-environmental action?

Psychotherapist as a Dance Archeologist

By Karen L Smith MSS, LCSW on April 03, 2017 in Full Living
An explanation through metaphor of why we repeat patterns from our families of origin and how therapy helps us change that.

How Climate Change Affects Mental Health

A new report offers evidence that our psyches are as vulnerable as our earth is to global warming.

10 Ways to Protect the Brain from Daily Screen Time

You may have heard that screen-time can wreak havoc on children's nervous systems. But aside from restricting technology, what can parents do to buffer against overstimulation?