Essential Reads

Life in the Slow Lane

What our blessed modern lives look like from an evolutionary perspective

Gossip in Your Workplace Probably Does More Good Than Harm

Gossip is a social skill, NOT a character flaw; it is essential to work life.

Environmental Values Don't Justify Ignoring the Facts

Decisions based on values that ignore the evidence don't do us the most good.

A Destination Divorce? Get Outta Town! No, Really

Why going away may improve your divorce.

Recent Posts on Environment

Medical Ethics Are Healthier Than Business Ethics

Traditional medical ethics puts patient welfare first. As corporations increasingly control health care, business ethics replace medical ethics. Doctors and patients must work together to defend the doctor-patient relationship.

Worries about the Apple Watch and the Internet-of-Things

There’s a lot happening in the internet-of-things, most of it beyond the horizon of our thing-filled lifestyles. The Apple Watch is the latest and perhaps most telling thing of all. Should we worry about this dazzling distraction? What will its social impact be? What are the environmental and labor costs associated with this new digital fashion accessory?

Spring Roadside Cleaning with Two Boys and Two Bags

So which is it: Do we take care of what we love? Or do we love what we take care of? Which comes first—loving the Earth or taking care of it?

Care for Nepal

Irrelationship is a shared defensive system that serves the purpose of shielding the participants from true connection. How might this be relevant for something as seemingly clear-cut as disaster response where responders and organizations trying to help are acting from altruistic motives? What can irrelationship tell us about care for the caretaker in disaster relief?

The Psychology of Climate Change Denial

By Steve Taylor Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Out of the Darkness
Climate scientists are almost unanimously convinced of the reality of man-made global warming. But only 50% of Americans believe in it. What are the psychological reasons for this discrepancy?

Life in the Slow Lane

Modern middle American life is a blessed experience from an evolutionary perspective. If you're "in the middle," then you have the luxury of experience a "high k" life history strategy. Read on to see how lucky you are for this fact!

The Environment and Deterrence of Criminality

With greater freedom comes more crime

Real Psychiatry and Darwinian Evolution are One and the Same

The basic principle for the development of human personality is at one with Darwinian evolution. Psychotherapy is the treatment that addresses the human issues in precisely the way they were constructed in the first place.

Kids and Animals Helping One Another at Green Chimneys

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in Animal Emotions
I just returned home from a most inspiring conference called "Growing Together: Kids, Animals and Sowing the Seeds of Resiliency" held at Green Chimneys in Brewster, New York. This interdisciplinary gathering on human-animal interaction shows how much can be done for the kids and the animals who in many ways rescue, help, and heal one another. Green Chimneys rocks!

The Wisdom of Our Elders

Good news: we can employ ordinary measures for mood improvement and to fight against anxiety, depression, and stress. My conclusion from working with nursing home residents is that feeling better does not usually require a miracle, just careful management of the mundane elements of our lives.

What Explains the Apparent Increase in Bad Manners?

By Gad Saad Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Homo Consumericus
Many people lament the apparent rise of bad manners in contemporary online and offline settings. In her latest book "Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*uck" Amy Alkon offers some practical solutions to the onslaught of daily boorish behaviors.

Gossip in Your Workplace Probably Does More Good Than Harm

By Frank T McAndrew Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Out of the Ooze
Campaigns to stamp out workplace gossip overlook the fact that gossip is part of who we are and an essential part of what makes work groups function as well as they do. It is more productive to think of gossip as a social skill rather than as a character flaw, because it is only when we do not do it well that we get into trouble.

Why Is Air Pollution So Bad for Your Brain?

Air pollution has long been associated with health risks including asthma and an increased risk of stroke. New findings show that air pollution also damages the human brain.

Is it Time to Change our Narrative about Climate Change?

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in More Than Mortal
One thing I have learned from my own research as a social psychologist is that fear is not always a good tool for changing attitudes. But fear is what we often use to get people to care about the environment.

Environmental Values Don't Justify Ignoring the Facts

By David Ropeik on April 23, 2015 in How Risky Is It, Really?
How one liberal community made a brave choice, choosing an objective review of the evidence rather than letting environmental passions determine policy on two hot-button 'green' issues.

Making Our Mark

By Michele Wick Ph.D. on April 22, 2015 in Anthropocene Mind
Imagine if change were as simple as having people contemplate the mark they want to leave on the world.

Happy Earth Day! Learn the Secret to Relationship Values!

By Kira Asatryan on April 22, 2015 in The Art of Closeness
Is "having the same values" required to make a relationship work? What if you value the environment and he doesn't?

Irrelationship with Mother Earth

The Earth is our par excellence caretaker. The Earth is a source of care that—like any "sane" caregiving mature relationship—will only be able to offer and give care if the love and care that we come up with, offer, and implement as individuals, communities, societies, and as a planet constitute genuine reciprocal—we care for the Earth, the Earth cares for us—solutions.

If the Earth Spoke, Would We Listen?

By Pythia Peay on April 21, 2015 in America On The Couch
It has often seemed to me that the only way humankind will change in time to avert its headlong course toward environmental destruction will be through the emergence of a new myth. Gary S. Bobroff, a Jungian-oriented psychologist, has devoted his life to studying the emergence of just such a history-changing myth: the emergence of . . .the phenomenon of crop circles.

A Destination Divorce? Get Outta Town! No, Really

By Wendy Paris on April 21, 2015 in Splitopia
You don’t need to travel to get a divorce today, but purveyors of tropical divorce getaways insist you might reach a better agreement under the swaying palm trees of someplace else.

Your Categories Drive What You See

By Art Markman Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
When you open your eyes, you see a picture of the world around you. Psychologists have explored many factors that influence what you point your eyes at when looking at a scene. People tend to look at information that will help them achieve their goals, for example. They also look at items in the environment that are important to them like human faces.

Technology May Be Ruining Your Ability to Read Emotions

Research shows how our digital world may be taking a toll on our emotional intelligence.

The Trillions of Mouths You Feed Each Day

By Erica Sonnenburg Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in The Good Gut
It’s a humbling experience to realize that humans, with our highly evolved, complex brain that can build towering skyscrapers and compose fine works of art, are, in essence, a bacteria-filled tube. But when they are not staving off disease, what are all these microbes doing there? Eating.

Judge Recognizes Two Chimpanzees as Legal Persons: A First

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in Animal Emotions
According to the Nonhuman Rights Project, "For the first time in history a judge has granted an order to show cause and writ of habeas corpus on behalf of a nonhuman animal…in a case brought by the Nonhuman Rights Project … Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Barbara Jaffe issued an order to show cause and writ of habeas corpus on behalf of two chimpanzees, Hercules and Leo.

How We Frame Emotions Through Facial Expressions

How our faces express emotions is a moving window into our minds.

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in Language in the Mind
What accounts for the hullabaloo surrounding the publication of The Language Myth. Is Chomskyan linguistics a form of intellectual fundamentalism? And is language science in the throes of a paradigm shift? It's certainly beginning to look that way!

How Brian Williams Can Earn Back Trust

Can Brian Williams earn back trust? Yes, he can if he follows the 4 H's and 4 R's.

All Psychology Is Evolutionary Psychology

‘Evolutionary psychology’ is a redundancy, in that all psychology is evolutionary psychology. I mean this in the same sense that all anatomy is ‘evolutionary anatomy'.

As A Nation, How Can We Best Empower Our Gifted Kids?

Should your child move ahead to that advanced math class? Should they skip a grade? Should they enter college early? What impact will that have on their educational and social/emotional trajectory? What does the research evidence tell us?

Alien Landing in Sindelfingen

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on April 19, 2015 in One Among Many
Imagine a world in which “learning” is easy. Believe anything! Such a world exists. It was recently put on display in Sindelfingen, Germany.