Essential Reads

What Scientists Know and Need to Share with the Public

Science is messy, uncertain, and very important

Client-Centered Therapy

Client-centered therapy is about respecting the self-determination of the client

What We Like About Stories

Both adults and children appreciate elements of surprise and predicability.

Geek Heresy: Bursting the Hi-Tech Hype Bubble

Kentaro Toyama's new book takes the steam out of the hype around tech

Recent Posts on Education

Tips for Parents to Increase Physical Activity in Children

According to research, physical activity plays an important role on academic achievement in children and adolescents. As a parent, your child is dependent on you to guide their healthy habits to cope with life. Here are a few tips to help increase physical activity in youth.

What Scientists Know and Need to Share with the Public

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on August 29, 2015 in More Than Mortal
Many scientific studies fail to replicate and this is okay. It is part of the process. However, scientists and the journalists who write about science need to do a better job explaining to the public how science works.

How Parents Can Help Their Child Build Self-Confidence

by Dona Matthews & Joanne Foster. One of the greatest gifts a parent can give a child is self-confidence. Help her understand her unique ability profile, show him that all learning happens in small steps, support her in developing her interests, be available as needed especially in times of change, and help him welcome setbacks as learning opportunities.

20 Secrets of Successful Students

Some are common sense, some counterintuitive and all guaranteed to help you get the 'A'.

Killing Academia: The Death of America's Colleges

Wake up, America! Your children are no longer being taught by professors.

Why Are Today’s College Students So Emotionally Fragile?

Brain research reveals why controlling parents stunt their children's growth.

Client-Centered Therapy

Non-directive therapy is often misunderstood as sloppy, unstructured, and passive, but actually it means very actively following the direction of the client, carefully, closely, and creatively.

What We Like About Stories

By Jamie Zibulsky Ph.D. on August 26, 2015 in Book Smart
Two of the characteristics of stories that are most important to us as readers or audience members may seem contradictory: we like surprises, but we also like predictability. Children also value these same elements in books, even from a young age.

Student Questions: The Good, the Bad, and the Interesting

Lots of professors love it when students ask questions. At best, questions reflect activity and engagement. As a way to encourage students to ask questions, professors might say something like, “There’s no such thing as stupid questions.” I agree. But I would consider some questions to be “bad.”

Language Learning in a Multilingual Country

What is everyday interaction like in communities where everyone speaks several languages? What language learning strategies do they use? What assumptions do they make about language learning? Dr. Leslie C. Moore answers questions about the two multilingual communities in northern Cameroon where she did her research and about her own language learning in the field.

Mathematical Woes

For many youth math can be a fearful and an intimidating subject. Unfortunately, the struggle with math can occur at an early age, and unless it's appropriately addressed the fear can travel well into adulthood.

Why America Can’t Read

Advanced research in cognitive science including brain scan science is demonstrating that explicit spelling instruction may be the missing link to reading success in America where sixty-five percent of fourth graders read below proficiency levels.

Psychotherapy as a Learning Experience

Therapy is a learning experience. Perhaps findings from the neuroscience of learning and memory can suggest ways to improve the storage of memories that are formed during a therapy session.

Geek Heresy: Bursting the Hi-Tech Hype Bubble

By Ravi Chandra M.D. on August 24, 2015 in The Pacific Heart
Kentaro Toyama takes aim at geek myths and cybersolutionism in his new book Geek Heresy. Social media gets a close look as well. Toyama draws important conclusions from his work in India, Africa and the U.S. on what really makes a difference in personal and societal development. Hint: it’s not your smartphone.

Grade Flation

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on August 24, 2015 in One Among Many
Grades are a mixed curse. We can't leave without them, unless the culture changes radically, which it won't. Here's some of the psychology between the preference for easy (and hard) As.

What Does It Take to Succeed in Life?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 24, 2015 in Media Spotlight
A new paper published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology describes one of the most comprehensive studies to date looking at the effects of family background, personality, and intelligence on later success. By studying 81,000 participants over an eleven-year period, researchers found that the American Dream is still alive and well. More or less.

My Advice to President Obama for Achieving World Peace

By Izzy Kalman on August 24, 2015 in Resilience to Bullying
President Obama, your deal with Iran is a blunder that rival's Bush's invasion of Iraq. If you want to earn the legacy of The President Who Brought Peace to the World, you need to forget about placing sanctions on nations that seek nuclear weapon capability and instead put sanctions on those nations that promote the "infidel meme."

One Reason Being a Perfectionist Isn’t All Bad

By Christopher Bergland on August 22, 2015 in The Athlete's Way
Do you consider yourself to be a perfectionist? New research identifies how various forms of perfectionism can have a bright side and a dark side.

Thank You For Not Sharing

By Nick Luxmoore on August 22, 2015 in Young People Up Close
Young people have to learn that there are degrees of privacy, that not sharing is normal.

Poison Apple: Technology Fads Make Your Kids Dumber

Students have confused the ability to look up a fact with actual knowledge.They can Google the who, what, and when, but can't explain "why."

Why It's Imperative to Teach Entrepreneurship

By Tina Seelig on August 21, 2015 in CreativityRulz
Our education system is responsible for preparing young people to build successful lives. They should be ready for the wide range of possibilities ahead of them, including working for others, starting their own ventures, and contributing to their communities.

Helping Kids Thrive in Middle School and High School

Early adolescence is a time of vulnerability and possibility, and whether they realize it or not, young people need their parents as much as they did as toddlers. Kids are moving toward independence, but parents still have an enormous role making sure they are safe, and increasing their chances of creating happily productive adult lives for themselves. Here are 10 ideas.

The Psychology of Dual Enrollment: The K14 Model

Dual enrollment offers a pathway that enables high school students to concurrently enroll in college courses and earn credits toward high school diploma and a college degree. This is a breakthrough strategy and a must read in order to have the full perspective!

The House Drunk: Finding Our Way Out Together, Part 2

Following up on the previous entry, Ray and his mother learn skills for building a real relationship despite the complications that are part of addiction. And here we are, learning how to do the hard work of building better relationships, together, when addiction makes it even harder.

Early Reading Adventures

By Jamie Zibulsky Ph.D. on August 19, 2015 in Book Smart
The last time I posted – slightly over a year ago – I was beginning a quiet summer and looking forward to a chance to catch up on my own fiction reading. Less than six weeks later, my husband and I were lucky enough to adopt a newborn baby boy, and my journey as a book smart parent began. I’ve had an incredibly fun year “practicing what I preach” with Henry.

Can Musical Training Help Overcome Dyslexia?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on August 19, 2015 in Talking Apes
Underlying dyslexia is an auditory processing disorder. Intense music training can remedy the disorder, but by then the “dyslexia” label may have already stuck.

Make It a Happy Start to School: Our Top 10 Secrets

Here are some ideas for parents who want to ease their child’s return to the classroom. There are thoughts on planning ahead, paying close attention, nurturing creativity, being reassuring, making real-world connections, encouraging exploration, supporting good work habits, making time for play, finding a healthy balance, and advocating as needed.

Psychologist vs Psychiatrist & More—What's the Difference?

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on August 18, 2015 in The Web of Violence
The Data Doctor answers a question about the differences between the alphabet soup of all the psychology degrees--Ph.D., M.D., PsyD, Ed.D., DSW, DPH, etc.

How New Research in Psychology is Changing American Homework

By Rebecca Jackson on August 18, 2015 in School of Thought
New research is inspiring parents to take a look at the conventional wisdom behind giving children unlimited amounts of time to complete homework assignments. In an interview with Stephanie Donaldson-Pressman, she discusses her research and advice for both parents and educators about increasing homework loads in primary school.