Education Essential Reads

How An Art Break Helps Kids Learn

By Darby Saxbe Ph.D. on September 27, 2016 in Home Base
Integrating play and creativity into the school day may help children learn. Here's an innovative school counseling program that did just that.

The Bonus Effect

By Alfie Kohn on September 27, 2016 in The Homework Myth
If you're told "Do this, and you'll get that," you're likely to become less interested in "this" -- and more interested in "that." Especially if "that" turns out to be money.

Is It Too Late to Say Balti?

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on September 20, 2016 in Language in the Mind
What is the nature of punning? Musical puns in TV adverts provide an unexpected venue to explore the linguistics of humor.

Will We Ever Notice Boys' Struggles?

I was a strong supporter of feminism until I discovered — nearly 25 years ago — that boys, much more than girls, were struggling in school and other very important ways.

College Students: Coddled or Constructive Activists?

By Saul Levine M.D. on September 19, 2016 in Our Emotional Footprint
Today, college students are expressing dissatisfaction and even feel threatened, but this is often more about their personal feelings rather than the chaotic state of the world.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Adolescence and Four Skills of Self-Discipline

Developing self-discipline is part of growing independence as one develops the capacity to become one's own authority when it comes to accomplishing what one needs to do.

The Professor’s Cheat Sheet to the Perfect College Tour

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on September 18, 2016 in Social Lights
20 things high schoolers and their parents should know about campus visits.
SergiyN/Shutterstock

How Much Homework Is Too Much? How Can Parents Push Back?

The10-minute homework rule begins at age six, but younger children are being asked to do more. Parents can be effective advocates for the best long-term developmental outcomes.

How to Remember Everything

By Ryan Anderson on September 13, 2016 in The Mating Game
Learning the basics of the Method of Loci technique is possibly one of the most effective ways to spend the next 15 minutes of your life

Why Is the Backward Research Method So Effective?

It forces up-front thinking about use of research results and required data, and removes guess-work on the researcher's part.

What Gifted Students Can Learn From Being Average

By Jonathan Wai Ph.D. on September 12, 2016 in Finding the Next Einstein
"It was okay to just be in the middle of the pack...That was a lovely experience."

Educators and Geneticists Should Talk

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on September 10, 2016 in How To Do Life
Education researchers act as though genes don't exist. They need to talk with top behavioral geneticists like Robert Plomin and to basic geneticists like George Church.

Learning Resilience Can Be a Two-Way Street

By Mindy Greenstein Ph.D. on September 09, 2016 in The Flip Side
How long could I stay vibrant and fun instead of the vulnerable cranky version I’m quickly becoming?
flickr user Kyla Borg

Knit with Grit

By Sunil Iyengar on September 06, 2016 in The Value of Art
Should premed curricula include a module in the visual or performing arts? It's not a bad idea.

Do Our Expectations of Kids Aim Too High or Too Low?

By Alfie Kohn on September 06, 2016 in The Homework Myth
Traditional approaches to raising and teaching kids don't give them credit for what they can do - and yet, at the same time, fail to acknowledge their developmental limits

Seductive Details in Teaching

By Rolf Reber Ph.D. on September 05, 2016 in Critical Feeling
Making a lesson fun looks like a good idea but may impair learning.

Is Modern Academic Feminism Harming Women?

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on September 04, 2016 in More Than Mortal
Are American women being harmed by feminists who treat them like they are an oppressed and fragile group that needs protected?

Watching A Bird Die

By Sam Osherson Ph.D. on September 03, 2016 in Listen Up!
Many of us avoid the topic of dying. Spending some time with death can deepen our engagement with life.

The "School Did Nothing to Stop the Bullying" Lie

By Izzy Kalman on August 25, 2016 in Resilience to Bullying
When children like Daniel Fitzpatrick commit suicide because of bullying, parents accuse the schools of having done nothing. They're usually wrong.

Easing a Child’s Summer to School Transition

School is right around the corner but your child is still sleeping until noon and moving in slow motion. Here are some suggestions to help get them ready for the new year.

So You're Starting Grad School This Fall?

By Amy Green M.A., C.C.C. on August 24, 2016 in Psy-curious
Graduate school is not simply the older sibling to undergrad. Embracing some of the differences sooner rather than later can help set you up for success.

To Bribe or Not to Bribe

Reading incentive programs, where students get points or prizes, and sometimes even grades, for reading “fun” books, are a ubiquitous feature of many literacy programs.

Should Academic Achievement Be the Primary Goal of Education

We spend huge amounts of money determining whether schools are teaching academic material successfully. But is that the most important task for schools? Maybe not.

Should We Treat Business School Students Like Customers?

University professors and administrators should be customer-oriented, but we should not treat students like customers.

Repairing the Damage of Abstinence-Based Sex Education

By David J Ley Ph.D. on August 17, 2016 in Women Who Stray
Only through good, real-world, holistic sex education can our country recover from the damage we've done to teens by promoting abstinence.

Learning the New Language of Racism

Language influences how we feel and how we react to things. Language is the foundation of change. Rather than avoid and deny, we need to start learning.

Play Is Serious Business

By Darby Saxbe Ph.D. on August 15, 2016 in Home Base
We evolved to learn through play. But the push towards academics has crowded out open playtime in schools. Play should be treated not as a privilege, but as a core part of learning

What You Read May Shape What You Write

Disappearing down the reddit rabbit hole? Why you might want to read some Dickens or Colson Whitehead, instead.

Wanting To Destroy Everything

By Nick Luxmoore on August 13, 2016 in Young People Up Close
Young people's appetite for destruction must be recognised if we are to forgive them.

Gifted Programs’ Embarrassing Secret

All gifted children should receive the specialized services they need to reach their fullest potential. Then why are some gifted students excluded?