Education Essential Reads

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

For several years now a bipartisan group, which includes experts in the area of boys’ issues and fatherhood—and many of these are women, some of whom strongly identify as feminists—has been pushing for a White House Council on Boys and Men which would parallel the one that President Obama established for women and girls shortly after he took office in 2009.

Peter Singer Argues for "Effective Altruism" in His New Book

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 25, 2015 in Animal Emotions
Renowned philosopher Peter Singer's new book called "The Most Good You Can Do" is a very thoughtful discussion about charitable giving. Whether you agree or disagree with Professor Singer's arguments I guarantee they will make you think deeply about what you do with your money and if your donations really do the most good you can do. This book also left me hopeful.

March Madness

By Jeffrey Lieberman M.D. on March 24, 2015 in Shrink Speak
Students and parents rarely consider that they might need mental health services during college and often urgently. For this reason, they would be well advised to include the quality and availability of mental health services along with traditional considerations as they decide on the college of their choice.

The Future Has Come and Gone: You Just Missed It

By Jeff DeGraff Ph.D. on March 23, 2015 in Innovation You
So what's the big so what? The very institutions that have defined how we lead in our modern world are being abandoned or morphed into new forms. We need to run a wider array of experiments to learn what really works and doesn't in the undiscovered country.

Adolescent Excellence and Managing High Expectations

When parents either support or encourage their teenager to have high personal performance expectations, they also need to provide guidance about how to manage their feelings when these outcomes are not met, as will sometimes occur.

Whatever Doesn't Kill You, Will Only Make You Stronger?

By Dawn C. Carr MGS, Ph.D. on March 20, 2015 in The Third Age
When bad stuff happens to resilient people, it appears that in the short-term they don’t do anything different from what nonresilient people do. Instead, they feel something different about their ability to handle things. And as a result, they fare better physically and psychologically over the long-term.

10 Things Your Psychology Professors Want You to Know

An education in psychology is enormous - including information on such diverse topics ranging from how infants perceive shapes to how rats learn to complete mazes - and more. Way more. The list found here distills a traditional education in psychology to 10 things that psychology professors really want their students to walk away with.

Should I Keep My Firstborn an Only Child?

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on March 19, 2015 in Singletons
In terms of the level of education, aspirations and achievement, firstborns and only children excel. Of the 12 men who walked on the moon, all were firstborns or only children. What gives firstborns and only children this distinct advantage?

College Students Gone Wild!

Rather than banishing misbehaving students from campus we should try to find a path of reconciliation, restorative justice, and thoughtful learning that ultimately makes for a better, and more compassionate, community.

Yes, You Can Raise Happy Children After Divorce

By Wendy Paris on March 17, 2015 in Splitopia
Intuitively, we feel that children should be raised by two married parents living together. But an avalanche of studies over the past 40 years shows that this isn’t what they need. Research shows that about 80-percent of children of divorce adapt well and see no lasting negative effects on their grades, social adjustment, or mental health. So what do kids need?

Guidance Counselors Should Reconsider the Gap Year

Research shows that gap years contribute to college success. So, why are college guidance counselors discouraged from suggesting them, even when they are in the best interest of the student? More importantly, how do we fix this?

Close Encounters with Criminal Minds

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on March 15, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
During the late 19th century a pathologist-turned-criminologist founded the technique of criminal autobiographies; from within the stories came deep truths.

Want to Live Longer? Make Good Friends.

By Dawn C. Carr MGS, Ph.D. on March 15, 2015 in The Third Age
It may be surprising, but who you choose as a friend matters, and so does the quality of those friendships. Good relationships have a potent beneficial impact on your health.

Do We Age in Stages?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 12, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Today's adults have greater freedom than ever to decide how best to live.

Excuse-making by School Children

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on March 11, 2015 in Memory Medic
A sense of self-efficacy has to be earned. It does not come from excuses.

Confessions of a Wildlife Filmmaker: Misinformation & Abuse

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 11, 2015 in Animal Emotions
According to Dr. Chris Palmer's book called "Confessions of a Wildlife Filmmaker," the state of wildlife filmmaking worsens every year. He argues it’s time for wildlife filmmaking to move in a more ethical direction. Broadcasters such Animal Planet, Discovery, National Geographic, and the History Channel must do better. And viewers can play a role in making this happen.

Complaining About Young Women

Today's young women are somehow obsessed with their own victimhood? Where do ideas like this come from?

How NOT to Raise a Narcissist

Narcissism is more than believing “I’m great!”; it’s believing “I’m better and more important than you!” Here's how NOT to raise a narcissistic child.

Recess Is Endangered

High stakes testing, fear of litigation, budget crunches, and just plain ignorance are reducing and even eliminating recess for children. Yet a wealth of research establishes the benefits of recess for academic achievement, physical development, healthy weight, and social competence. It's time to make sure recess is an educational right for all children.

Re-clarifying Terms of Conduct at the Start of Adolescence

It is natural, and normal, and healthy for the beginning adolescent to test to what degree the old family demands and constraints of childhood still apply. It is natural, and normal, and healthy for parents to respond in the interests of the young person's safety and responsibility.

Is College Still Worth the Money?

By Sherry Hamby Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in The Web of Violence
Getting an education is still a good path to well-being.

Is True Friendship Still Possible?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 04, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Face-to-face conversations extending over decades is indeed evaporating.

7 Ways to Make Yourself Divorce-Proof

Many singles are interested in marriage but fear divorce. You can do things before marriage to increase your odds of lasting love in marriage.

Adolescent Self-Management for a Successful Independence

A major goal of parenting high school age adolescents is helping them develop basic skills of self-management that will support more independence soon to come.

Our Top-Down Brains and How They Help Us Adapt to the World

What you see is often not a matter of the stimuli that are in front of you, but a matter of your expectations. The “affair of the dress,” and whether you see it as white-gold or blue-black is just another example of our top-down brains.

Do Generations Exist?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Is it misleading to speak about a self-absorbed “Me Generation” or jaded, cynical GenXers, overeducated and underemployed?

Four Reasons to Worry About "Personalized Learning"

By Alfie Kohn on February 24, 2015 in The Homework Myth
When kids create their own meaningful projects, the learning is personal. When kids are fed prefabricated skills and constantly tested (via computer), the learning is "personalized." The latter is profitable for corporations, but not so great for our children.

A+ Students/C- Learners: Education’s Report Card

By APA Division 15 on February 24, 2015 in PsychEd
Today’s educational system is contributing to an undesirable and unanticipated problem—the production of many achievement-oriented, high-performing students who are, at best, mediocre learners. This is a bold and controversial claim that demands substantiation. beginning with what distinguishes good students from good learners.

How to Save Your Career From Social Media Meltdown

By Nancy Rothbard Ph.D. on February 23, 2015 in The Science of Work
Sharing the wrong thing on social media can cost you your job.

8 Negative Attitudes of Chronically Unhappy People

All of us experience negative thoughts from time to time. How we manage our negative attitudes can make the difference between confidence versus fear, hope versus despair, mastery versus victimhood, and victory versus defeat. Here are eight negative attitudes of chronically unhappy people...