Education Essential Reads

6 Insider Tips for New Ph.D. Students

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 in Caveman Politics
Welcome to the Ph.D. “business”! It’s peculiar and you’re probably entering it at a huge information disadvantage. Profit from these insider tips.

Waving Sadly and Yet Joyfully Goodbye

By Michael W Corrigan Ed.D. on September 01, 2015 in Kids Being Kids
My wife started back to work fulltime. After admirably serving seven years in the trenches of child warfare on the not so tropical resort island known as Imagonna Pullmyhairout, she joined the ranks of the millions who deserve to be awarded a “Stay at Home Mom” Medal of Honor. As a recovering Mr. Mom, this blog is dedicated to all of you Stay at Home Parents.

What If the Diagnosis of Autism Is Wrong?

How does this happen? There are many neuropsychologists who are excellent and take time to evaluate a child. Sometimes, children do not perform well because they are afraid of the unfamiliar adult or the testing tasks and environment. Sometimes, at a young age, particularly in cases of a language delay, the child doesn’t understand the intent of the question.

What Scientists Know and Need to Share with the Public

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on August 29, 2015 in More Than Mortal
Many scientific studies fail to replicate and this is okay. It is part of the process. However, scientists and the journalists who write about science need to do a better job explaining to the public how science works.

Client-Centered Therapy

Non-directive therapy is often misunderstood as sloppy, unstructured, and passive, but actually it means very actively following the direction of the client, carefully, closely, and creatively.

What We Like About Stories

By Jamie Zibulsky Ph.D. on August 26, 2015 in Book Smart
Two of the characteristics of stories that are most important to us as readers or audience members may seem contradictory: we like surprises, but we also like predictability. Children also value these same elements in books, even from a young age.

Geek Heresy: Bursting the Hi-Tech Hype Bubble

By Ravi Chandra M.D. on August 24, 2015 in The Pacific Heart
Kentaro Toyama takes aim at geek myths and cybersolutionism in his new book Geek Heresy. Social media gets a close look as well. Toyama draws important conclusions from his work in India, Africa and the U.S. on what really makes a difference in personal and societal development. Hint: it’s not your smartphone.

What Does It Take to Succeed in Life?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 24, 2015 in Media Spotlight
A new paper published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology describes one of the most comprehensive studies to date looking at the effects of family background, personality, and intelligence on later success. By studying 81,000 participants over an eleven-year period, researchers found that the American Dream is still alive and well. More or less.

Why It's Imperative to Teach Entrepreneurship

By Tina Seelig on August 21, 2015 in CreativityRulz
Our education system is responsible for preparing young people to build successful lives. They should be ready for the wide range of possibilities ahead of them, including working for others, starting their own ventures, and contributing to their communities.

Do First Amendment Rights Apply to Students in School?

By Peter Gray on August 16, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
In this interview, conducted by guest blogger Alex Walker, the founder of Free Student Press, David Krane, explains that student free speech is legally protected by the first amendment, but students must fight for that protection. School officials typically do everything they can to prevent students from knowing about and exercising their constitutional rights.

9 Ways To Improve Your Child’s Chances For Success

Many new parents may be too busy to realize it, but Tovah Klein of Columbia University argues that “the ages from two to five are crucial for your child’s long-term healthy development and success—for laying the foundation of who they will become over time.” Here are 9 ways to improve your child's chances for success from "the toddler whisperer."

Mental Health 101

What if psychological principles guided the entire academic experience for college students? With ongoing mental health innovations, the possibilities are plentiful.

Women in Science: Why So Few?

The smaller number of women than men with jobs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields is an established fact. Trying to understand why and coming up with solutions is not an easy task.

Student-Athlete...or Athlete-Student?

By Alexis Hatcher on August 05, 2015 in Psy-College-y Today
Despite what colleges claim, academics doesn’t always end up coming first. Here's an athlete's perspective on why that is.

Can Improv Comedy Treat Social Anxiety?

By Jon Fortenbury on August 02, 2015 in NeuroProgress
People are increasingly turning to improv comedy (theatre made up on the spot) to reduce social anxiety. The reason it's working for some and not all is simple, but powerful.

Yet Another Reason Why It’s Good to Be a First-Born Child

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on July 31, 2015 in Social Instincts
New research finds that eldest siblings are better at picking up second languages.

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

How can concerned parents help today's college students become healthier, more successful young adults?

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Today's parents must raise children in two worlds, offline and online, and for adolescents freedom on the Internet has a powerful allure.

Are You Tone Deaf?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on July 24, 2015 in Talking Apes
The musically gifted often foist the “tone deaf” label on those whose music production abilities aren’t up to their expectations, but most have music perception skills in the normal range.

By Neglecting Spatial People, What Innovations Have We Lost?

Peter Thiel famously said of the future: “We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters.” As innovative as Twitter might be, it pales in comparison to engineering feats that could truly transform our future. And by neglecting spatially talented people, we may have already lost so many incredible inventions.

Resilience: The Capacity to Rebuild and Grow from Adversity

Resilience is not a genetic trait. It is derived from the ways children learn to think and act when they are faced with obstacles, large and small. How do teachers cultivate resilience in the classroom?

How Asking Tough Questions Could Save Your Career

By Hal Gregersen on July 13, 2015 in The Curiosity Deficit
Had Kodak’s leaders ratcheted up their discomfort level by asking more challenging questions from others, it may well have sustained its legacy as a key industry player.

Keeping Adolescents Mindful of Parental Needs

For parents who want their teenager to act mindful of their needs, training in this relatedness needs to start in childhood (when it is mostly welcome) and not put off to adolescence (when it is mostly not.)

Russia’s ‘Safe-Selfie’ Campaign: Will It Work?

The Russian authorities have launched a “safe selfie” campaign in response to a series of deaths and serious injuries among extreme selfie-takers. Since most selfie-takers are under 25, showing them what NOT to do will make extreme selfies more, not less, attractive. The initiative ignores the motivational factors driving the need to show off doing dangerous things.

Whole Language or No Language?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on July 10, 2015 in Talking Apes
There are more things in reading and writing, Educators, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

Using Psychology to Help At-Risk Students

By Art Markman Ph.D. on July 09, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
There are many rewards for doing research in psychology. For one, it is just plain fun. There is something powerful about making progress on one of the world’s great scientific mysteries. For another, the things we learn about psychology have the potential to make people’s lives better.

K & Preschool Teachers: Last Stand in War on Childhood?

By Peter Gray on July 08, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
The war against childhood continues. Children are no longer generally free to roam, play, and explore on their own, as they were in the past and are designed by nature to do. Parents who allow such play are being arrested. Schools throughout the country have eliminated or greatly curtailed recesses. The last bastion in the battle to preserve childhood appears to be be....

How Does Physical Experience Affect Learning?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on July 01, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
Go to a typical classroom, and it looks like a show. A teacher stands in front of the room. The teacher talks and demonstrates things from the front of the room. Unlike a show at a theater, the audience (the students) do get a chance to talk on occasion. But, most of the work students do is done from their seats.

Is High Self-Esteem Bad for You?

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on June 28, 2015 in A Sideways View
Research suggests that the belief that bolstering self-esteem leads to many positive psychological and behavioural consequences may be misguided. Indeed it could have seriously unintended consequences and make matters worse

Build Your Young Child’s Future School Success NOW

Prediction is often the key measurement in intelligence tests. Activities allowing your child to recognize, play with, and create patterns build his power of prediction.Successful prediction is one of the best problem-solving strategies the brain has and necessary for successful reading, calculating, test taking, goal setting, and appropriate social behavior.