Education Essential Reads

Can Viewpoint Diversity Save Academia?

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on October 27, 2016 in More Than Mortal
Liberals largely control the social sciences and dominate the university culture. Is this lack of viewpoint diversity harmful?

The Role of the Parent, Caregiver, and Teacher

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on October 27, 2016 in How To Do Life
An interview with Alison Gopnik.

How Will Artificial Intelligence Change Education and Work?

A new report titled “Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030” explores the role of AI in various aspects of society and considers implications for our future.

The Ethics of Sharing Client Stories

How can I use my clients as examples in my teaching, while honoring my clients’ confidentiality and therapeutic experience? What are the ethical limits to telling clients' stories?

Skin Picking and Hair Pulling

Does skin picking or hair pulling significantly limit your life?

Strategic Studying: The Value of Forced Recall

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on October 09, 2016 in Memory Medic
School has started, and many students are discovering that they are not doing as well as expected. Parents and teachers may be chiding them about working harder. That may not help.

Freedom of Speech on Campus

Universities have a long history of hiring professors who hold strongly liberal perspectives. This fact has led to a major lack of viewpoint diversity. And this is a problem.

Big Data and Everyday Life

When it comes to figuring out your musical taste, Pandora is the champ. That's because Pandora is based on Big-Data - and Big-Data is the future in the behavioral sciences.

A New Approach to Weight Loss

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on October 03, 2016 in Cravings
Accept the challenge and commit to learning new skills, new research says.

Five Inspirational Films

By Jann Gumbiner Ph.D. on October 03, 2016 in The Teenage Mind
There is a huge creative outpouring of film these days and a lot of it focuses on kids and teachers.
Labelled for reuse;

Goals Are Not What You Think!

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on October 02, 2016 in In Control
Goals are always about the outcome or result of particular behaviours, not about the actions that bring those results into being.

How Universities Can Foster Ethical Awareness Among Students

Given the state of the world and the deteriorating level of public discourse now is an important time to do what we can to instill ethical decision making among college students.

The Top Ten Myths About Men’s Sexuality

By Joe Kort Ph.D. on September 30, 2016 in Understanding the Erotic Code
It is time to stop gender bias and catch therapists up to understanding what really is happening in men’s erotic universe.

Biological Foundations for Self-Directed Education

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in Freedom to Learn
Self-directed education—as it occurs in unschooling families and at democratic schools--operates by allowing these four natural drives to flourish. ....

How An Art Break Helps Kids Learn

By Darby Saxbe Ph.D. on September 27, 2016 in Home Base
Integrating play and creativity into the school day may help children learn. Here's an innovative school counseling program that did just that.

The Bonus Effect

By Alfie Kohn on September 27, 2016 in The Homework Myth
If you're told "Do this, and you'll get that," you're likely to become less interested in "this" -- and more interested in "that." Especially if "that" turns out to be money.

Is It Too Late to Say Balti?

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on September 20, 2016 in Language in the Mind
What is the nature of punning? Musical puns in TV adverts provide an unexpected venue to explore the linguistics of humor.

Will We Ever Notice Boys' Struggles?

I was a strong supporter of feminism until I discovered — nearly 25 years ago — that boys, much more than girls, were struggling in school and other very important ways.

College Students: Coddled or Constructive Activists?

By Saul Levine M.D. on September 19, 2016 in Our Emotional Footprint
Today, college students are expressing dissatisfaction and even feel threatened, but this is often more about their personal feelings rather than the chaotic state of the world.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Adolescence and Four Skills of Self-Discipline

Developing self-discipline is part of growing independence as one develops the capacity to become one's own authority when it comes to accomplishing what one needs to do.

The Professor’s Cheat Sheet to the Perfect College Tour

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on September 18, 2016 in Social Lights
20 things high schoolers and their parents should know about campus visits.

How Much Homework Is Too Much? How Can Parents Push Back?

The10-minute homework rule begins at age six, but younger children are being asked to do more. Parents can be effective advocates for the best long-term developmental outcomes.

How to Remember Everything

By Ryan Anderson on September 13, 2016 in The Mating Game
Learning the basics of the Method of Loci technique is possibly one of the most effective ways to spend the next 15 minutes of your life

Why Is the Backward Research Method So Effective?

It forces up-front thinking about use of research results and required data, and removes guess-work on the researcher's part.

What Gifted Students Can Learn From Being Average

By Jonathan Wai Ph.D. on September 12, 2016 in Finding the Next Einstein
"It was okay to just be in the middle of the pack...That was a lovely experience."

Educators and Geneticists Should Talk

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on September 10, 2016 in How To Do Life
Education researchers act as though genes don't exist. They need to talk with top behavioral geneticists like Robert Plomin and to basic geneticists like George Church.

Learning Resilience Can Be a Two-Way Street

By Mindy Greenstein Ph.D. on September 09, 2016 in The Flip Side
How long could I stay vibrant and fun instead of the vulnerable cranky version I’m quickly becoming?
flickr user Kyla Borg

Knit with Grit

By Sunil Iyengar on September 06, 2016 in The Value of Art
Should premed curricula include a module in the visual or performing arts? It's not a bad idea.

Do Our Expectations of Kids Aim Too High or Too Low?

By Alfie Kohn on September 06, 2016 in The Homework Myth
Traditional approaches to raising and teaching kids don't give them credit for what they can do - and yet, at the same time, fail to acknowledge their developmental limits

Seductive Details in Teaching

By Rolf Reber Ph.D. on September 05, 2016 in Critical Feeling
Making a lesson fun looks like a good idea but may impair learning.