Education Essential Reads

The Back-to-School-Night Speech We'd Like to Hear*

By Alfie Kohn on October 03, 2015 The Homework Myth
Sit in a school auditorium listening to a list of rules and procedures, on the one hand, and numbing banalities about how "all children can learn," on the other hand -- and dream of a presentation that gets to the heart of what schooling could be like if kids (and learning) really mattered most...

Four Ways to Foster Ethics in College Athletics

With appropriate attention and desire, college athletics can be an excellent venue for nurturing ethical behavior and character formation. It really doesn't take that much time or money to make it happen. But will colleges make it a priority?

Time Management 101

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on September 29, 2015 Head of the Class
College students, especially those in their first year, often struggle with time management. How can they learn to use their time wisely while still reserving some for recreation and socializing? Documenting where and how they spend (and often lose) their time is a good first step.

Four Essential Keys to Successful Teaching

If you’re a teacher of any sort, then your success is primarily marked by the success of your students. Interested in keys to cultivating student success? Read on.

The Future of Standardized Testing?

In science fiction novel Ender’s Game, the talent and personality of each battle school student is adaptively assessed by the Mind Game, tailored to their interests and individuality. The game was used, in part, to select Ender Wiggin as the young commander who would save the world. What can this teach us about the future of testing?

Seven Shifts as Generation Y Becomes Generation Z

By Tim Elmore on September 21, 2015 Artificial Maturity
As we work with students, we’ve discovered these young teens are showing signs of a “morph,” shifting away from old realities and into new ones. Here’s what we’ve found*:

It Is Incredibly Difficult to Obtain an Evolution Education

Darwin’s big idea has been out since about 1859. Since that time, evolutionary principles have proven to be extraordinarily useful in helping us understand all kinds of things. So you’d think that it would be easy to learn about evolution in modern universities. In reality, finding an evolution education in college is excessively difficult these days.

Integrity in the Classroom

How do children learn to be honest, respect societal norms, and act in ways consistent with the values, beliefs, and moral principles they claim to hold? How do teachers instill and reinforce a code of ethics in their classrooms when evidence suggests high-stakes testing fosters a culture of dishonesty?

5 Questions Better Than "How Was Your Day?"

By Andrea Bonior Ph.D. on September 08, 2015 Friendship 2.0
Kids worldwide are back at school-- and parents are eager to hear how it's going. If your child seems to stall out at "Fine" when asked how his or her day went, these five questions can set the stage for a more interesting discussion.

Six Ways Universities Can Foster Better Ethics on Campus

If colleges make ethical development a priority and infuse campus life with ethical decision making we would likely have many fewer press headlines about college students behaving badly. And we’d likely also have less anxious parents and administrators too!

6 Insider Tips for New Ph.D. Students

By Gregg Murray Ph.D. on September 02, 2015 Caveman Politics
Welcome to the Ph.D. “business”! It’s peculiar and you’re probably entering it at a huge information disadvantage. Profit from these insider tips.

Waving Sadly and Yet Joyfully Goodbye

By Michael W Corrigan Ed.D. on September 01, 2015 Kids Being Kids
My wife started back to work fulltime. After admirably serving seven years in the trenches of child warfare on the not so tropical resort island known as Imagonna Pullmyhairout, she joined the ranks of the millions who deserve to be awarded a “Stay at Home Mom” Medal of Honor. As a recovering Mr. Mom, this blog is dedicated to all of you Stay at Home Parents.

What If the Diagnosis of Autism Is Wrong?

How does this happen? There are many neuropsychologists who are excellent and take time to evaluate a child. Sometimes, children do not perform well because they are afraid of the unfamiliar adult or the testing tasks and environment. Sometimes, at a young age, particularly in cases of a language delay, the child doesn’t understand the intent of the question.

What Scientists Know and Need to Share with the Public

Many scientific studies fail to replicate and this is okay. It is part of the process. However, scientists and the journalists who write about science need to do a better job explaining to the public how science works.

Client-Centered Therapy

Non-directive therapy is often misunderstood as sloppy, unstructured, and passive, but actually it means very actively following the direction of the client, carefully, closely, and creatively.

What We Like About Stories

By Jamie Zibulsky Ph.D. on August 26, 2015 Book Smart
Two of the characteristics of stories that are most important to us as readers or audience members may seem contradictory: we like surprises, but we also like predictability. Children also value these same elements in books, even from a young age.

Geek Heresy: Bursting the Hi-Tech Hype Bubble

By Ravi Chandra M.D. on August 24, 2015 The Pacific Heart
Kentaro Toyama takes aim at geek myths and cybersolutionism in his new book Geek Heresy. Social media gets a close look as well. Toyama draws important conclusions from his work in India, Africa and the U.S. on what really makes a difference in personal and societal development. Hint: it’s not your smartphone.

What Does It Take to Succeed in Life?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on August 24, 2015 Media Spotlight
A new paper published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology describes one of the most comprehensive studies to date looking at the effects of family background, personality, and intelligence on later success. By studying 81,000 participants over an eleven-year period, researchers found that the American Dream is still alive and well. More or less.

Why It's Imperative to Teach Entrepreneurship

By Tina Seelig on August 21, 2015 CreativityRulz
Our education system is responsible for preparing young people to build successful lives. They should be ready for the wide range of possibilities ahead of them, including working for others, starting their own ventures, and contributing to their communities.

Do First Amendment Rights Apply to Students in School?

By Peter Gray on August 16, 2015 Freedom to Learn
In this interview, conducted by guest blogger Alex Walker, the founder of Free Student Press, David Krane, explains that student free speech is legally protected by the first amendment, but students must fight for that protection. School officials typically do everything they can to prevent students from knowing about and exercising their constitutional rights.

9 Ways To Improve Your Child’s Chances For Success

Many new parents may be too busy to realize it, but Tovah Klein of Columbia University argues that “the ages from two to five are crucial for your child’s long-term healthy development and success—for laying the foundation of who they will become over time.” Here are 9 ways to improve your child's chances for success from "the toddler whisperer."

Mental Health 101

What if psychological principles guided the entire academic experience for college students? With ongoing mental health innovations, the possibilities are plentiful.

Women in Science: Why So Few?

The smaller number of women than men with jobs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields is an established fact. Trying to understand why and coming up with solutions is not an easy task.

Student-Athlete...or Athlete-Student?

By Alexis Hatcher on August 05, 2015 Psy-College-y Today
Despite what colleges claim, academics doesn’t always end up coming first. Here's an athlete's perspective on why that is.

Can Improv Comedy Treat Social Anxiety?

By Jon Fortenbury on August 02, 2015 NeuroProgress
People are increasingly turning to improv comedy (theatre made up on the spot) to reduce social anxiety. The reason it's working for some and not all is simple, but powerful.

Yet Another Reason Why It’s Good to Be a First-Born Child

New research finds that eldest siblings are better at picking up second languages.

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

How can concerned parents help today's college students become healthier, more successful young adults?

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Today's parents must raise children in two worlds, offline and online, and for adolescents freedom on the Internet has a powerful allure.

Are You Tone Deaf?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on July 24, 2015 Talking Apes
The musically gifted often foist the “tone deaf” label on those whose music production abilities aren’t up to their expectations, but most have music perception skills in the normal range.

By Neglecting Spatial People, What Innovations Have We Lost?

Peter Thiel famously said of the future: “We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters.” As innovative as Twitter might be, it pales in comparison to engineering feats that could truly transform our future. And by neglecting spatially talented people, we may have already lost so many incredible inventions.