Education Essential Reads

Yet Another Reason Why It’s Good to Be a First-Born Child

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on July 31, 2015 in Social Instincts
New research finds that eldest siblings are better at picking up second languages.

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

How can concerned parents help today's college students become healthier, more successful young adults?

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Today's parents must raise children in two worlds, offline and online, and for adolescents freedom on the Internet has a powerful allure.

Are You Tone Deaf?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on July 24, 2015 in Talking Apes
The musically gifted often foist the “tone deaf” label on those whose music production abilities aren’t up to their expectations, but most have music perception skills in the normal range.

By Neglecting Spatial People, What Innovations Have We Lost?

Peter Thiel famously said of the future: “We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters.” As innovative as Twitter might be, it pales in comparison to engineering feats that could truly transform our future. And by neglecting spatially talented people, we may have already lost so many incredible inventions.

Resilience: The Capacity to Rebuild and Grow from Adversity

Resilience is not a genetic trait. It is derived from the ways children learn to think and act when they are faced with obstacles, large and small. How do teachers cultivate resilience in the classroom?

How Asking Tough Questions Could Save Your Career

By Hal Gregersen on July 13, 2015 in The Curiosity Deficit
Had Kodak’s leaders ratcheted up their discomfort level by asking more challenging questions from others, it may well have sustained its legacy as a key industry player.

Keeping Adolescents Mindful of Parental Needs

For parents who want their teenager to act mindful of their needs, training in this relatedness needs to start in childhood (when it is mostly welcome) and not put off to adolescence (when it is mostly not.)

Russia’s ‘Safe-Selfie’ Campaign: Will It Work?

The Russian authorities have launched a “safe selfie” campaign in response to a series of deaths and serious injuries among extreme selfie-takers. Since most selfie-takers are under 25, showing them what NOT to do will make extreme selfies more, not less, attractive. The initiative ignores the motivational factors driving the need to show off doing dangerous things.

Whole Language or No Language?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on July 10, 2015 in Talking Apes
There are more things in reading and writing, Educators, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

Using Psychology to Help At-Risk Students

By Art Markman Ph.D. on July 09, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
There are many rewards for doing research in psychology. For one, it is just plain fun. There is something powerful about making progress on one of the world’s great scientific mysteries. For another, the things we learn about psychology have the potential to make people’s lives better.

K & Preschool Teachers: Last Stand in War on Childhood?

By Peter Gray on July 08, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
The war against childhood continues. Children are no longer generally free to roam, play, and explore on their own, as they were in the past and are designed by nature to do. Parents who allow such play are being arrested. Schools throughout the country have eliminated or greatly curtailed recesses. The last bastion in the battle to preserve childhood appears to be be....

How Does Physical Experience Affect Learning?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on July 01, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
Go to a typical classroom, and it looks like a show. A teacher stands in front of the room. The teacher talks and demonstrates things from the front of the room. Unlike a show at a theater, the audience (the students) do get a chance to talk on occasion. But, most of the work students do is done from their seats.

Is High Self-Esteem Bad for You?

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on June 28, 2015 in A Sideways View
Research suggests that the belief that bolstering self-esteem leads to many positive psychological and behavioural consequences may be misguided. Indeed it could have seriously unintended consequences and make matters worse

Build Your Young Child’s Future School Success NOW

Prediction is often the key measurement in intelligence tests. Activities allowing your child to recognize, play with, and create patterns build his power of prediction.Successful prediction is one of the best problem-solving strategies the brain has and necessary for successful reading, calculating, test taking, goal setting, and appropriate social behavior.

23 Mental Health Professionals Interviewed About Their Jobs

By Brad Waters on June 24, 2015 in Design Your Path
Going behind the scenes with 23 mental health professionals to gain insight into the pros and cons of the industry.

Anti-intellectualism Is Killing America

By David Niose on June 23, 2015 in Our Humanity, Naturally
America's social and political dysfunction is rooted in dangerous pathology: anti-intellectualism.

Play, Common Core, and Early Reading Untangled

In a raging debate, leading researchers in reading education are speaking out in favor of keeping Common Core Kindergarten Literacy Standards. Their message? It’s perfectly fine for five year olds to play AND learn to read in school!

Fiction, Non-Fiction, and Teaching Psychology

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on June 22, 2015 in Head of the Class
Fewer students enjoy reading for reading's sake—we need to integrate literary fiction and good non-fiction into the classroom. Doing so can bring psychological ideas alive but also help students appreciate reading for pleasure and insight into behavior.

Building With LEGO Kit Instructions Makes Kids Less Creative

By Garth Sundem on June 16, 2015 in Brain Candy
The more we complete "well-defined" problems like LEGO kits, the worse we are at solving "ill-defined problems": create something beautiful, discover something meaningful, find someone to love.

Defeating the Deficit Model of Aging

Receiving an invitation to your 50 year high school reunion might just be the perfect chance to reflect on life and reframe your attitude to embrace the future. By taking the time to record your life story, you may see opportunities to continue growth and reward yourself for all the strength and accomplishments achieved over time.

Teach Kids the Wisdom of Failure Long Before Graduation

By Tamar Chansky Ph.D on June 09, 2015 in Worry Wise
Our job is to not wait for graduation to talk about failure and success. It’s a little late then. Rather, we need to be rolling out the red carpet for our kids throughout their education. Making saying “I don’t know” or making mistakes safe. Making “I don’t know for sure” a noble and defendable position.

Sorry, Emoji Doesn't Make You Dumber

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on June 08, 2015 in Language in the Mind
Far from emoji dragging us back to the dark ages, their advent has helped recalibrate our emotional intelligence: digital communication is catching up with the repertoire of communicative tools we have in the spoken medium. Emoji is an empowering addition to the hitherto, primarily, textual format in the digital arena.

Teachers Should Reward Questions, Not Just Answers

By Hal Gregersen on June 05, 2015 in The Curiosity Deficit
How encouraging children to ask questions can increase their capability to innovate.

Rejecting Evolutionary Psychology Is Rejecting Evolution

Behavior is the result of the nervous system – which is the result of eons of natural selection. Rejecting evolutionary psychology, thus, is the same as rejecting evolution itself.

Money Talks or Millennials Walk

By Eddy Ng Ph.D. on June 03, 2015 in Diverse and Competitive
Millennials are willing to stay for the right amount of money.

Educational Prestige as Career Insurance

By Chris Rider Ph.D. on June 03, 2015 in The Continuum
Research finds that for two people with the same jobs, the one who graduated from the more prestigious school will suffer lesser career consequences if their employer fails, and that a school’s alumni network places a central role in maintaining one’s career trajectory. So, you might want to choose a graduate school based on the career insurance that the school provides.

How Early Academic Training Retards Intellectual Development

By Peter Gray on June 03, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
In the absence of an appropriate intellectual foundation and motivation to learn, students acquire academic skills by rote, in shallow, meaningless ways. This not only wastes students' time, but can cause serious harm to their future intellectual and academic development. Here's some of the evidence.

The Importance of Evidence-based Practice

By APA Division 15 on June 02, 2015 in PsychEd
In virtually every professional field, a research-to-practice gap exists in which some practices shown to be effective by scientific research are seldom used in applied settings, but some commonly implemented practices are not empirically validated and may be ineffective or even harmful. Thus, great opportunity exists for those who employ research-based practices.

What Adolescents Can Learn From Parental Conflict

The job of parents is to provide a constructive example for conducting conflict with each other from which their adolescent can positively learn.