Education Essential Reads

The Importance of Evidence-based Practice

By APA Division 15 on June 02, 2015 in PsychEd
In virtually every professional field, a research-to-practice gap exists in which some practices shown to be effective by scientific research are seldom used in applied settings, but some commonly implemented practices are not empirically validated and may be ineffective or even harmful. Thus, great opportunity exists for those who employ research-based practices.

What Adolescents Can Learn From Parental Conflict

The job of parents is to provide a constructive example for conducting conflict with each other from which their adolescent can positively learn.

What Do Children Know About Climate Change?

Children are the future stewards of our fragile ecosystem. What does research tell us about what children know and feel about environmental threats, such as climate change? What are the best ways to educate and engage children on these issues?

The Psychology of Plagiarism: Is Cheating the New Normal?

By Peg Streep on May 21, 2015 in Tech Support
Have we become a nation of cheaters, so focused on getting what we want that we don't care what means we use?

The Psychology of Getting Back in the Batter’s Box

Want to learn about building resilience? Developing team values? Developing a positive identity? Little League baseball has got all of this and more.

The Power of Wisdom to Enact Social Change

Many believe that the rise of technology and the logical problem solving mindset can solve the world’s problems. But after years of creating technologies to help improve poverty, health, and education, Kentaro Toyama started to reach a different conclusion: Social change comes from the heart, mind, and will of people. Technologies are only as good as the wisdom of people.

How Technical Devices Influence Children's Brains

Guest blog by Dan Riseman, president of Riseman Educational Counseling, covers children's brain development. Here are some dos and don'ts regarding devices.

What Women Need to Know about the Bystander Effect in Men

The problem of sexual aggression toward female students by their male peers is becoming an increasing matter of concern on college campuses. Alcohol is known to be a risk factor in fueling violence against women but new research shows that sexist attitudes greatly compound the dangers.

The One Graduation Message We All Need to Hear

The field of evolutionary psychology has enormous implications for how to guide the next generation of leaders. In particular, the field helps illuminate the nature of giving—a value that we expect all of our graduates to internalize.

Finding Something to Like

There is an art to what you say to people when you are evaluating their work and the work leaves much to be desired. My view is that you don’t want to be dishonest, but at the same time you don’t want to crush a person’s spirit.

Mathematics Fluency Training - It Works!

By Michael Hogan Ph.D on May 12, 2015 in In One Lifespan
Numeracy – our everyday play with numbers – is essential to the rhythm of life and our adaptive success as a species. There is a wonderful beauty in numbers that infants and toddlers intuitively appreciate as those around them play with numbers in song, story, dance, and life drama. But why is it that we so often hear an emerging negative attitude in relation to maths?

The Gift of Positive Psychology: Empower Teachers

How do we express our gratitude to our favorite teachers? Empower them.

How to Build Rapport: A Powerful Technique

By Aldo Civico Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Turning Point
Knowing how to build rapport is at the root of our personal and professional success. Here is a powerful technique you can practice right away, as soon as you finish reading this article.

The Future of Crowdsourcing in the Classroom

By Thomas Hills Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Statistical Life
The notion that we live in an increasingly consumer-based culture is not new, but the capacity for computers to reduce students to point-and-click robots in complicated virtual Skinner boxes should not be lost. Students are at risk of being increasingly met with boilerplate environments that are designed to reduce knowledge to its most clickable form.

One More Reason to Unplug Before Bedtime

How does being "plugged in" to an electronic device impact a young child's developing brain?

The Secret to Teaching Creativity

By Jeff DeGraff Ph.D. on April 27, 2015 in Innovation You
The secret to teaching creativity is simply to surround students with people who are creating.

Introduction to Investing in Healthy Minds

True or False: As a society we should be investing more in the mental health of young people. I’m guessing you answered “true.” But can you prove it?

The Grass Moment

By Alfie Kohn on April 24, 2015 in The Homework Myth
If we want to raise kids who aren't self-centered, we should stop emphasizing compliance and instead foster a willingness to question authority

Why We Get Such Dumb Advice About Love, Money and Health

Does not every teenager already know you should comb your hair and look for a kind, suitable partner? What kind of dumb advice is this?

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in Language in the Mind
What accounts for the hullabaloo surrounding the publication of The Language Myth. Is Chomskyan linguistics a form of intellectual fundamentalism? And is language science in the throes of a paradigm shift? It's certainly beginning to look that way!

What to Do When Your Life Takes an Unexpected Turn

As you make your way through life, you are guided by both the long- and short-term goals you’ve set for yourself. However, your plans may take an unexpected turn. From research on “career shocks,” you can learn to manage the unexpectedly good and bad that life throws your way whether in your career or your relationships.

A Strength-Based Approach Helps Children

The positive psychology movement has started to ask "what is healthy," "what is working," and "what are a child’s strengths" as central—and often more important—than what is wrong or what disorder or illness does a child have... and this can change lives.

Failing Our Fathers

Many studies of fatherhood leave out nonresidential fathers, particularly those of lower educational and financial backgrounds. A new book by Ronald Mincy and colleagues offers rich insight into the challenges faced by U.S. economically vulnerable nonresidential fathers.

What Are the Most Important 10 Years of Your Life?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on April 04, 2015 in The Prime of Life
The ten years from eighteen to twenty-eight are the pivotal decade in a person’s life.

Does It Really Matter Where You Go to College?

If you want to be a leader in society, where you go to school probably matters. A good college, after all, might increase the likelihood of your success. When parents worry about which school their kids go to, they may be acting quite rationally.

Socioeconomic Factors Impact a Child's Brain Structure

In the largest study of its kind, a team of investigators from nine different universities have identified a correlative link between family income and a child’s brain structure.

Get on the Train

By Ariel Gore on March 30, 2015 in Women and Happiness
I'm going to give you some advice your parents and teachers might not: Drop out of high school.

Protective Parenting an Adolescent

With all the media attention devoted to adolescents getting in trouble, getting hurt, and getting killed, it's hard for parents not to worry about their teenager and to act restrictively in her or her defense. However, the best protection parents can provide is self-management preparation for safely functioning in a hazardous world.

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

For several years now a bipartisan group, which includes experts in the area of boys’ issues and fatherhood—and many of these are women, some of whom strongly identify as feminists—has been pushing for a White House Council on Boys and Men which would parallel the one that President Obama established for women and girls shortly after he took office in 2009.

Peter Singer Argues for "Effective Altruism" in His New Book

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 25, 2015 in Animal Emotions
Renowned philosopher Peter Singer's new book called "The Most Good You Can Do" is a very thoughtful discussion about charitable giving. Whether you agree or disagree with Professor Singer's arguments I guarantee they will make you think deeply about what you do with your money and if your donations really do the most good you can do. This book also left me hopeful.