Essential Reads

Socioeconomic Factors Impact a Child's Brain Structure

Family income and parental education are linked to a child's brain development.

Get on the Train

For Palo Alto High School students who have considered suicide

Protective Parenting an Adolescent

Unable to proof their teenager from harm, parents can encourage safe conduct

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

Parents and grandparents of boys, take heart: Their time has come.

Recent Posts on Education

Autism and Sleep

By John Cline Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in Sleepless in America
Parents of children with autism often report sleep difficulties for themselves and their children. Research over the past decade has given information about the sleep difficulties faced by these children. Problems falling and staying asleep, having negative attitudes toward and fears related to sleep are significantly more common among these children.

Music Therapy Activities Wiki

Learn more about music therapy, the value of music therapists and how music therapists envision and develop music therapy strategies. MusicTherapyActivities.Wikia.com is an encyclopedic collection of therapeutic music activities, indexed by goal and objective-- and it will help you understand more about the range of this dynamic approach to health.

The Self-Deceptions of Recycling

By Kenneth Worthy Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in The Green Mind
It’s important to keep in mind that recycling not only takes large amounts of energy and resources to turn materials into products again, it also may lead to greater consumption and avoidance of better solutions. It’s better to instead focus on the three Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

The Top Four Reasons Relationships Fail

Committed relationships can survive ups and downs, but some patterns and behaviors can create more permanent damage. Infidelity is only one of the reasons relationships break up. These four negative patterns raise red flags about the state of your relationship or marriage. If you recognize your relationship here, it's time to change course

The Internet Is Not a Playground

Browsing online can be a wonderful thing—until it's not such a wonderful thing.

What Happens When the Class Clown Grows Up

Every school classroom seems to have a class clown—the nightmare of most teachers. However, we know very little about what happens to them when they enter the world of work, home, and community. When they grow up, these “wits” or jokesters can also create havoc to the other adults who inhabit their world.

Socioeconomic Factors Impact a Child's Brain Structure

In the largest study of its kind, a team of investigators from nine different universities have identified a correlative link between family income and a child’s brain structure.

Do You Have to Be a Billionaire to Make a Difference?

By Renee Garfinkel Ph.D. on March 31, 2015 in Time Out
The super-rich are well-placed to be a positive influence in the world. Many of them are trying, according to their lights. You can talk with one of the super-rich tonight: share your views of the good society and how we can move toward it.

High School and Beyond

As a parent, you understand the desire to help your child succeed in the world and have the best future possible. Many parents dream their child will be successful, obtain postsecondary education, excel academically and most of all: find a career that is rewarding and satisfying. After all, isn't that the American dream?

Get on the Train

By Ariel Gore on March 30, 2015 in Women and Happiness
I'm going to give you some advice your parents and teachers might not: Drop out of high school.

Shaping Women's Lives: Our Bodies, Ourselves

"Our Bodies, Ourselves" is listed in the Library of Congress "Books That Shaped America.” Since its original publication more than 40 years ago, the book set a foundation for evidence-based, culturally appropriate information on women’s health, sexuality, and reproduction. Co-author Judy Norsigian says, “Gatekeepers no longer have the control they had in the past.”

Advocacy or Privacy?

By Liza Long on March 30, 2015 in The Accidental Advocate
Is it oversharing to talk about your child's mental illness? What if your child has cancer?

Protective Parenting an Adolescent

With all the media attention devoted to adolescents getting in trouble, getting hurt, and getting killed, it's hard for parents not to worry about their teenager and to act restrictively in her or her defense. However, the best protection parents can provide is self-management preparation for safely functioning in a hazardous world.

Can Healthy Living Reduce Cancer Risk? (Part One of Two)

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on March 30, 2015 in Media Spotlight
According to available statistics, roughly fourteen million people worldwide were newly diagnosed with cancer in 2012 alone. That same year saw about eight million cancer deaths. How many of those deaths might have been prevented using available medical knowledge about cancer risks? And how many more cancer deaths can we expect over the next three decades?

Nausea Unto Death?

Responsibility

Changes in the Family: Impact on Sexual Development

In modern times, the family unit has been dramatically reconstructed. Regardless of the family’s formation, the behaviors observed by children of both single and two-parent families significantly impact children’s sexual development.

Cluelessness 101

By Frank T McAndrew Ph.D. on March 29, 2015 in Out of the Ooze
One of the seldom mentioned perks of being a college professor is the opportunity to play a role in the divine comedy of academic life, but we professors are not the stars of the show.

Higher Rate of Depression in ADHD College Students

College students with ADHD are more likely to experience depression than their non-ADHD peers.

The Argument for Later School Start Times

Schools need to start no earlier than 8:30am, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Life is a Like a Metaphor

When you stand alone like scraps of paper instead of “high-piled books” on Keats’s “shore of the wide world,” and love and fame “to nothingness do sink,” it might help to recognize that your current construction of the situation is a metaphor, and that you are not literally littoral litter.

When You Ask a Child to Sing ….

Researchers in Canada and Japan asked preschoolers (4 and 5 year olds) to create a song.Their results reveal some interesting differences about children’s education and about cultural expectations and differences.

What do Children Think about Love?

A group of over thirty preschoolers and kindergarteners were asked what they thought of the word “love.” While younger children were primarily focused on an external conceptual line of thinking, the older children had moved to one that was more internally based.

Danger to Self and Others

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on March 28, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
The recent airline disaster involving a co-pilot crashing a plane highlights the need to rethink risk evaluations for suicide.

Birth Your Way

By Sharon Praissman on March 28, 2015 in Beyond the Egg Timer
Women over 35 are more susceptible to birth interventions. However, training for labor, finding providers who meet your needs, and good fortune can lead to a happy birth experience.

Contrarian Advice on Succeeding in Your Career

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 28, 2015 in How To Do Life
For those with doubts about the effectiveness of conventional career advice.

Changing the ‘No Casserole’ Response to Mental Illness

A mother of two who is active in the International Bipolar Foundation shared a story the other day. When her youngest daughter was diagnosed with diabetes, friends called, sent cards and flowers, brought food, and posted encouraging Facebook messages.

BattleKasting a Path to Literacy

How do you motivate kids to want to read a book? Extend a storyworld into other platforms, such as the mobile game BattleKasters to create multiple entry points into the story. Alane Adams set out targeting reading literacy, but she has created a training ground for essential 21st century literacies integrating reading, gaming and constructing transmedia narratives.

The Case of the Incentivized Applicant

How much is a job interview worth?

A Tipping Point: We've Finally Noticed Boys' Struggles

For several years now a bipartisan group, which includes experts in the area of boys’ issues and fatherhood—and many of these are women, some of whom strongly identify as feminists—has been pushing for a White House Council on Boys and Men which would parallel the one that President Obama established for women and girls shortly after he took office in 2009.

Who Participates in Dog-sporting Events and Why?

Although people can be highly competitive in the various dog-sports, recent research shows that internal motives and social benefits are more important than trophies and accolades.