Essential Reads

How Will Artificial Intelligence Change Education and Work?

A new report titled “Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030” explores the role of AI in various aspects of society and considers implications for our future.

The Ethics of Sharing Client Stories

How can I use my clients as examples in my teaching, while honoring my clients’ confidentiality and therapeutic experience? What are the ethical limits to telling clients' stories?

Skin Picking and Hair Pulling

Does skin picking or hair pulling significantly limit your life?

Strategic Studying: The Value of Forced Recall

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on October 09, 2016 in Memory Medic
School has started, and many students are discovering that they are not doing as well as expected. Parents and teachers may be chiding them about working harder. That may not help.

More Posts on Education

The Rise of Incivility and What To Do About It

By Ray Williams on October 21, 2016 in Wired for Success
Has incivility become the new norm in America? Fundamental ethical values such as respect, fairness, honesty, personal responsibility and tolerance seem to be fading.

A Burned-Out Occupational Therapist Thinks About Quitting

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in How To Do Life
My exchange with a caller to my radio program about becoming a college counselor.

Understanding Passive Aggressive Behavior

While anger is generally experienced as an uncomfortable emotion, the passive-aggressive person derives pleasure out of frustrating others.

Mastering Your Emotions

By L. Kevin Chapman Ph.D. on October 17, 2016 in Evidence Based
The "how to" guide of mastering all of your emotions

What Do You Mean, Self-Esteem?

By Nick Luxmoore on October 15, 2016 in Young People Up Close
Like so many well-meaning behavioural interventions, the idea of self-esteem is simplistic. Without a secure sense of self, good experiences are likely to wash over us.
Photo courtesy of Ricci Coughlan/DFID Flickr Creative Commons

Thank You, Michelle Obama!

In this time of change and challenge, children need help becoming smart and creative. Thank you, Michelle Obama, for living this message so effectively.

Your Brain and That "Other National Deficit"

Recent research indicates that our brain's susceptibility to false memories of the past may actually come in handy in our encounters with unfamiliar situations in the future.

Not Just Bilingual—Biliterate!

An increasing number of states are offering a Seal of Biliteracy to high school students who can read and write well in two languages. We think this is a good idea.

How to Keep a Dog From Jumping Up on People

You can keep a dog from jumping on people by considering the dog's behavior, and how people usually respond to the behavior.

4 Critical Questions to Ask When Choosing a Ph.D. Program

Weigh these important factors before you head down the wrong path.

Applying to Grad School in Psychology?

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on October 10, 2016 in Head of the Class
If you or someone you know is a college senior or a college graduate who wants to go for a graduate degree in psychology, the time to apply is soon—get organized now!

What Do Early-Learners Need Most? Play!

A broad body of evidence finds that young children need more play time to succeed in school and life — both with their peers and with adults.

10 Questions to Ask at a College Open House

What should you ask at a college tour or open house? Here’s a quick guide—from the inside.

Why You Need to Be a Success at Failure

By Atalanta Beaumont on October 07, 2016 in Handy Hints for Humans
Failure: Your inbuilt learning curve.

What’s It All About, Alfie? (And Fred)

By John Staddon, Ph.D. on October 07, 2016 in Adaptive Behavior
Are schedules of reinforcement an accurate template for education? Or is operant conditioning irrelevant? Is education all about 'intrinsic motivation'?

Three Reasons for Teen Unhappiness and What to Do About It

By Tim Elmore on October 06, 2016 in Artificial Maturity
With all the resources and technology we have at our fingertips, is it safe to assume American kids would likely be the happiest?

Smart Trees Teach via New Film & Bestselling Book

By Rachel Clark on October 05, 2016 in Mothering Nature
“The Hidden Life of Trees” hits NYTs Best Sellers list, while companion film “Intelligent Trees” roots out the science of tree chatter. Turns out forests have a few things to say.

Developmental Equity: Path to Student Success?

Educational equity is important, especially for youth impacted by race, cultural, and economic barriers. But is developmental equity more critical to success?

Educating the Educators About 21st Century Youth and Policy

By APA Division 15 on October 04, 2016 in PsychEd
America’s mostly white and female teaching force does not reflect the broad diversity of students they serve. As a result, there is a widening student-teacher “culture gap."
Richard Cobb

The Ripper Conclave

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on October 01, 2016 in Shadow Boxing
Ripperologists gather for a conference in Whitechapel to explore the infamous 1888 Ripper murders.

What Is Lasting Love?

Can we learn to appreciate our romantic partner without the sparks and fireworks? Clearly, some people manage to. What is their secret?

Energy Bites for Teachers

By Joseph Cardillo Ph.D. on September 29, 2016 in Attention Training
Often times the last person teachers think about is themselves.

A Brief Look at Medical Student Syndrome

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on September 29, 2016 in In Excess
There is some empirical evidence that some particular sub-groups of people appear to suffer hypochondria-related disorders relating to the medical conditions they are studying

Reading With Purpose, or Purposes

My university hired a PR firm to help sell us. The major slogan they came up with was “Learn with Purpose.” I was cynical at first, but it turns out to be a pretty good principle!

The Mirage of Sexism

By Liz Swan Ph.D. on September 27, 2016 in College Confidential
Sexism is real. But what about when it's not? Find out why calling something "sexist" when it's not can be counterproductive and self-defeating.

A Broad, Studying: My Semester in London, 1977

When you live in another country, you learn that you carry the ability to make a life for yourself wherever you are. It's a lesson that should never be underestimated.

Can Sophistication in Writing Be Measured?

What those puzzling scores at the bottom of articles really mean.

Continue to BE Uncomfortable

By Josephine Ensign DrPH on September 25, 2016 in Catching Homelessness
On the importance of getting out of your comfort zone and confronting racism in constructive ways.

Can a Harvard Degree Actually Reduce Patient Trust?

I have made a conscious decision to forgo hanging my diplomas. Here’s why.

Tech Exec on Opportunity and the Future for Our Children

By Michael Woodward Ph.D. on September 22, 2016 in Spotting Opportunity
Sixty-five percent of our children will work in jobs that don't yet exist.