Essential Reads

Singles, You Can Lower Your Risk of Divorce

The things you can do before you marry that can change your odds of divorce

Adolescent Self-Management for a Successful Independence

Graduate your high school senior with basic skills for self-reliance

Our Top-Down Brains and How They Help Us Adapt to the World

What the gold-white, blue-black dress debate reveals about how our brains work

Do Generations Exist?

Are generations caricatures or are they drivers of social and cultural change?

Recent Posts on Education

A Visit to the Psychiatric Hospital Made Me Sick

By Noam Shpancer Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Insight Therapy
Our psychiatric inpatient care system is insufficient and often detructive. But the inpatient population is not a wealthy, vocal, or well-organized pressure group. In our current cultural moment, without a strong voice in the Halls of Power, you may well end up wandering aimlessly down the corridors of an ill-staffed and ill-equipped hospital ward, talking to yourself.

It's a Wrap!

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Head of the Class
How can we get students to review what they did wrong on exams and papers?

Singles, You Can Lower Your Risk of Divorce

Many singles are interested in marriage but fear divorce. You can do things before marriage to increase your odds of lasting love in marriage.

The Brain Is Not an Octopus

By Susan Greenfield Ph.D. on March 02, 2015 in Mind Change
Engaging in several tasks at once might seem like a wonderful solution for keeping pace with the speed of twenty-first-century life, but the price paid could be high.

The Unbearable Weight of the Pink Ribbon

Former writer for the L.A. Times Laurie Becklund, age 66, died on February 8th from metastatic breast cancer. As she lay dying, she wrote a scathing op-ed, published after her death, denouncing breast cancer 'awareness.' Indeed, most awareness campaigns overlook several key facts about breast cancer, facts that make a world of difference. #Metsmonday.

Parenthood and Resilience

By Michael W Austin on March 02, 2015 in Ethics for Everyone
Resilience is a crucial but often neglected trait that parents should try to build in their children.

Adolescent Self-Management for a Successful Independence

A major goal of parenting high school age adolescents is helping them develop basic skills of self-management that will support more independence soon to come.

5 Things Everyone Should Know About Resilience

By Peg Streep on March 02, 2015 in Tech Support
When we speak of someone being "resilient," we tend to think of it as a character strength. But what is resilience anyway, and what does it take to weather the setbacks in life? A look at the research reveals much...

How I Try to Make My Work Life Healthy

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on February 28, 2015 in How To Do Life
We're working longer and harder. At least we can work healthier.

Our Top-Down Brains and How They Help Us Adapt to the World

What you see is often not a matter of the stimuli that are in front of you, but a matter of your expectations. The “affair of the dress,” and whether you see it as white-gold or blue-black is just another example of our top-down brains.

How (Not) to Win the War on Terrorism

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
How can we protect society against a few committed radicals who can disrupt society by marshaling powerful communications networks? In the good old days, we tracked the movement of physical assets as early warning signs of trouble. What can we do now, when weapons are intangible and untraceable? Might it be possible to mobilize the mainstream as a balancing force?

On Art And Madness

By Sheila Kohler on February 27, 2015 in Dreaming for Freud
My mother would often warn me, “Now Sheila, you don’t want to be too clever for your own good.” Obviously she equated “cleverness” with something dangerous. She was much more interested in how people had reacted to my dress after a party, “Did they like your dress?” she would ask, rather than my report card.

The Bystander Effect

By Rosemary K.M. Sword on February 27, 2015 in The Time Cure
We’d all like to think that when we see something bad happening that we’d step forward to render aid. But in reality most of us don’t. And although some people won’t take the initiative to help, they will take the time to photograph or videotape the event and post it on the internet. Why?

Winning Moves in "Searching for Bobby Fischer"

By Skip Dine Young Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Movies and the Mind
"Searching for Bobby Fischer" is a movie about greatness in chess. But more than that, it is about maintaining compassion as one pursues excellence. It is also a caution to parents who may be tempted to overly identify with their children's success.

Why SeaWorld Can’t Float: Censorship and Business Ethics

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 27, 2015 in Animal Emotions
SeaWorld attempted to censor talks at the 14th International Conference of the American Cetacean Society (ACS) last November that criticized them in the areas of the ethics of captivity and their business practices. Dr. Thomas White, who was one of the presenters being closeted, has now posted his presentation for all to see. It's well worth the time to view and share it.

They Talk, We Listen

By G.A. Bradshaw Ph.D., Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Bear in Mind
"I don’t know what happened, my Sweet Girl is gone. Yesterday she left in the morning and didn’t even say good-bye. She just left. I waited all day yesterday and she never came home, and today she’s still not home. I am really, really sad. I don’t even know what I am going to do with myself."

Not Just High Achievers

By Hilary Levey Friedman Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in Playing to Win
How can we understand the impressive performances on Child Genius? It's more than just brains, it's also achievement patterns.

An Integrative Approach to Wellness Really Works

I had a cerebral bleed causing me to black out resulting in a serious automobile collision. Months later I had brain surgery. I was told by my doctors I was permanently brain damaged. Determined to get better, I set out on my journey to regain my life. So I experimented with a variety of different approaches to treatment, and got better!

The Psychological Antidote – Part II

By Ran Zilca on February 26, 2015 in Confessions of a Techie
If today we choose to show others how similar we are to them instead of how different, we may prove their dehumazing thoughts wrong, break the vicious cycle of dehumanization, and prevent tomorrow’s violence by creating a situation that reduces the motivation for conflict.

Tell Walter What's On Your Mind

This free online service can check your thinking for irrational ideas, and when it finds any, it lets you know.

Do Generations Exist?

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Is it misleading to speak about a self-absorbed “Me Generation” or jaded, cynical GenXers, overeducated and underemployed?

Are Kids Curious?

By Glenn C. Altschuler Ph.D. on February 26, 2015 in This Is America
In The Hungry Mind, Engel draws on the latest social science research to understand why curiosity is nearly universal in babies, and less evident in school. Although most children learn more when their curiosity is piqued, “schools do not always, or even often, foster curiosity.” But in an era that prizes quantifiable results, curiosity is not likely to be a priority.

Searching for the Topless Classroom

Many professors teach in a bottomless way. The class I observed was topless.

How to Integrate Mindfulness Practices into the Classroom

By Azadeh Aalai Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in The First Impression
How may college students benefit if mindfulness practices are introduced into their classes?

Are People Naturally Scientific?

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on February 25, 2015 in Hot Thought
Some social and developmental psychologists have claimed that people—even children—naturally think like scientists. I find this claim implausible because: people are naturally religious rather than scientific; everyday thinking frequently deviates from scientific reasoning; and science is a relatively recent cultural development.

Waldorf Schools: Are They Way Behind the Times?

By Maureen D Healy on February 24, 2015 in Creative Development
Are computers a must-have for today's tech savvy kids?

Four Reasons to Worry About "Personalized Learning"

By Alfie Kohn on February 24, 2015 in The Homework Myth
When kids create their own meaningful projects, the learning is personal. When kids are fed prefabricated skills and constantly tested (via computer), the learning is "personalized." The latter is profitable for corporations, but not so great for our children.

Ebb and Flow

By Stephen Gray Wallace on February 24, 2015 in Decisions Teens Make
Overuse of technology by young people may result in distraction, stress and impaired performance. Help them find flow!

A+ Students/C- Learners: Education’s Report Card

By APA Division 15 on February 24, 2015 in PsychEd
Today’s educational system is contributing to an undesirable and unanticipated problem—the production of many achievement-oriented, high-performing students who are, at best, mediocre learners. This is a bold and controversial claim that demands substantiation. beginning with what distinguishes good students from good learners.