Essential Reads

How to Build Rapport: A Powerful Technique

Learning how to match and mirror others.

The Future of Crowdsourcing in the Classroom

If we let students create content, they make connections we couldn't.

One More Reason to Unplug Before Bedtime

Reading a bedtime story improves a child's brain function and mental imagery.

The Secret to Teaching Creativity

How do you teach creativity?

Recent Posts on Education

Does Harry Potter Have the Power to Wipe Out Prejudice?

According to a recent study, young people who identify with Harry Potter are less likely to be prejudiced against minority groups.

How Can We Scale-Up the Education of Innovators?

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on May 01, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
We spend billions of dollars to ask: How can we learn to be innovative and entrepreneurial? If we believe we need more innovators, how might our approach to education need to be changed? How do we know what students learn? Is the ability to innovate more of a creative art or disciplined engineering? What if we had an Artificial Intelligence Mentor? How might that work?

How Is Education Becoming Irrelevant - Education vs Learning

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on May 01, 2015 in Jacob's Staff
What's wrong with the way we think about education? How are corporations dealing with Millennials? Do you feel that the significance of what you know is decreasing at an exponential rate? How can we cope? How is the Knowledge Economy fundamentally different from the Industrial Economy? What are the implications of a Sharing Economy?

My, We're Doing Well!

By Stanton Peele on May 01, 2015 in Addiction in Society
We have been targeting rebuilding inner-city communities, integrating minority youth into society, improving education and life prospects for deprived populations, creating better community policing, etc., for more than a half century. And we're exactly where we started out.

A Workover: B.A. Wants to Make a Difference and a Living

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on May 01, 2015 in How To Do Life
Advice I gave to a caller to my NPR-San Francisco radio program.

Playing Hard to Get Works Differently for Men and Women

When you meet a sexy stranger, should you act interested or play it cool? The answer depends on whether you are a man or a woman. Read on to learn the science...and the answer.

The Art of Art Therapy Shapeshifting

Shapeshifting, also known as transmorgrification and transformation, is found throughout the realms of myth and folklore. Art therapy, a field that embraces the symbolic world and the process of transformation, has its own shapeshifting tales to tell, too.

Learning to Decline the Call to Sugar

If stress relief is a reason you are craving sugar, look for alternative means of stress relief such as exercise, meditation, yoga, and even venting to friends.

Let’s Advance Education as a Learning System

By APA Division 15 on April 30, 2015 in PsychEd
Most people would acknowledge that learning is not just about transmitting facts. We eschew the idea that teachers should simply deposit knowledge into the heads of students. Instead, we hope that education will expand students’ understanding of the world and encourage them to discover new ideas and observe how they play out in the world.

How to Build Rapport: A Powerful Technique

By Aldo Civico Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Turning Point
Knowing how to build rapport is at the root of our personal and professional success. Here is a powerful technique you can practice right away, as soon as you finish reading this article.

Is It Ethical for Professors to Assign Their Own Books?

Lots of people—students, friends, colleagues, and publishing professionals—who think it’s automatically a conflict of interest for professors to assign their own books. But is it an unethical conflict of interest? Does the base motive for money unduly contaminate the noble motives to help students?

The Future of Crowdsourcing in the Classroom

By Thomas Hills Ph.D. on April 29, 2015 in Statistical Life
The notion that we live in an increasingly consumer-based culture is not new, but the capacity for computers to reduce students to point-and-click robots in complicated virtual Skinner boxes should not be lost. Students are at risk of being increasingly met with boilerplate environments that are designed to reduce knowledge to its most clickable form.

This Is How You Should Learn

By Jen Kim on April 28, 2015 in Valley Girl With a Brain
According to research from the National Academy of Sciences, the most effective (and exemplary) teaching methods are those that truly engage its students.

One More Reason to Unplug Before Bedtime

How does being "plugged in" to an electronic device impact a young child's developing brain?

The Secret to Teaching Creativity

By Jeff DeGraff Ph.D. on April 27, 2015 in Innovation You
The secret to teaching creativity is simply to surround students with people who are creating.

Introduction to Investing in Healthy Minds

True or False: As a society we should be investing more in the mental health of young people. I’m guessing you answered “true.” But can you prove it?

Kids and Animals Helping One Another at Green Chimneys

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on April 26, 2015 in Animal Emotions
I just returned home from a most inspiring conference called "Growing Together: Kids, Animals and Sowing the Seeds of Resiliency" held at Green Chimneys in Brewster, New York. This interdisciplinary gathering on human-animal interaction shows how much can be done for the kids and the animals who in many ways rescue, help, and heal one another. Green Chimneys rocks!

Sitting Can Drain Brain Power and Stifle Creativity

Sitting has become an epidemic. Not only does sitting increase health risks and obesity—sitting can also stifle creative thinking and disrupt cognitive engagement.

What Is the Optimally Efficient Gap Between Study Sessions?

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 25, 2015 in Memory Medic
Learning success depends on when you study.

The Grass Moment

By Alfie Kohn on April 24, 2015 in The Homework Myth
If we want to raise kids who aren't self-centered, we should stop emphasizing compliance and instead foster a willingness to question authority

Choosing to Be Child-free

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in A Sideways View
More and more people in the west are choosing not to have children. Is this a puzzle for evolutionary psychologists? What does the research say on this topic?

Why We Get Such Dumb Advice About Love, Money and Health

Does not every teenager already know you should comb your hair and look for a kind, suitable partner? What kind of dumb advice is this?

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in Language in the Mind
What accounts for the hullabaloo surrounding the publication of The Language Myth. Is Chomskyan linguistics a form of intellectual fundamentalism? And is language science in the throes of a paradigm shift? It's certainly beginning to look that way!

My Student Wants a Romantic Relationship

Romance, teachers, and students don't mix.

Backward America

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on April 20, 2015 in Hidden Motives
Do we just take it for granted that the U.S. is the best at everything? We don’t seem to notice how bad things really are or how much better off other countries are in ways we used to excel.

What are Learning Styles?

By Phil Newton on April 20, 2015 in From Mouse to Man
What are Learning Styles? Should educators be using them? Do they work? Do they even exist? Do they matter?

Are Athletes Good Role Models?

Being a sport superstar doesn’t automatically qualify a person to be a role model. What are the credentials for the job?

As A Nation, How Can We Best Empower Our Gifted Kids?

Should your child move ahead to that advanced math class? Should they skip a grade? Should they enter college early? What impact will that have on their educational and social/emotional trajectory? What does the research evidence tell us?

Motor Activity Improves Working Memory in Children with ADHD

A new study suggests that a majority of students with ADHD could perform better on classroom work, tests, and homework if they were allowed to sit on activity balls or exercise bikes while learning.

Why Do Rich Kids Have Higher Standardized Test Scores?

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University recently reported that the academic “achievement gap” on standardized tests between lower-income and higher-income children is reflected in brain anatomy.