Essential Reads

Yet Another Reason Why It’s Good to Be a First-Born Child

Research finds that eldest siblings are better at picking up second languages

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

Nurturing college students for success, not dependency

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Parents must prepare adolescents for both offline and online life

Are You Tone Deaf?

Or do you just think you are?

Recent Posts on Education

Yet Another Reason Why It’s Good to Be a First-Born Child

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on July 31, 2015 in Social Instincts
New research finds that eldest siblings are better at picking up second languages.

Affects, Language, and Cognition

For many months, we have been exploring the three pillars of human development: Affects (Feelings), Language, and Cognition. We have tried to make the case that there is a revolution in our understanding of human development. I have suggested that this revolution has tremendous potential for enhancing development.

Teaching Through Insights

What would it look like to view teaching as a process of creating insights? Here are 6 ideas: diagnosing why students are confused, helping students unlearn mistaken beliefs, encouraging students to pursue their own feedback, anticipating knowledge shields and breaking through them, working through the three pathways to insight, and promoting an insight stance.

5 Strategies to Reduce Gender Bias Against Girls As Leaders

These 5 stategies for reducing gender bias were recently developed by researchers at Harvard University. These 5 easy tips have the potential to close the gender gap in leadership for teenage girls in the future.

Should You Take a Gap Year Before Grad School?

The Data Doctor answers a question about the pros and cons of a "gap" year between undergrad and grad school.

Does Your Child Need To See A Psychologist?

By Mack R. Hicks Ph.D. on July 28, 2015 in Digital Pandemic
The idea that all children are pretty much the same is a great American Myth. Teachers need to discover their students' learning styles and personalities.

Music Training Improves Adolescent Brain Development

Music training during adolescence helps the teenage brain hone skills necessary for academic and life success.

Positive Psychology of Mindfulness

When students call out "Present', make sure they know what it means. So what does "Present" really mean? It does not just mean "here" - it means here in the moment and mindfully in touch with the learning.

What Helicopter Parents Need to Know

How can concerned parents help today's college students become healthier, more successful young adults?

I Hate Multiple Choice

What do multiple choice tests measure? Is that what we want to know?

Psych Write: Psychology Can Make Sense and Be Fun to Read!

Authors trying to write about psychology for general audiences may err by writing the same way they would write journal articles, or they may err by writing too casually. These tips can help students, psych pros, journalists, bloggers, and water cooler conversationalists achieve the right balance while clearly talking about psychology. Jargon is good. Really, it is.

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Today's parents must raise children in two worlds, offline and online, and for adolescents freedom on the Internet has a powerful allure.

Are You Tone Deaf?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on July 24, 2015 in Talking Apes
The musically gifted often foist the “tone deaf” label on those whose music production abilities aren’t up to their expectations, but most have music perception skills in the normal range.

Replication and Generalizability of Evidence-Based Practices

By APA Division 15 on July 23, 2015 in PsychEd
A clear way to impact education with all populations is to address the issues that have been identified in literature as the “replication crisis.” And, the beauty of the replication crisis is it provides extensive opportunities for meaningful growth in the field of educational psychology.

Who Makes a Qualified Children’s Media Researcher?

By Jamie Krenn Ph.D. on July 21, 2015 in Screen Time
Thoughts related to research training within the field of children's media.

Childhood Poverty Has Detrimental Impacts on Brain Structure

Evidence continues to mount that there is a link between growing up in a low-income household, brain development, and lower academic achievement. The majority of children attending public schools in the United States come from low-income households. We have a crisis on our hands. In this blog post, I summarize the findings of a wide range of recent studies on this topic.

Why "Making Learning Fun" Fails

What happens if we teach children that learning is supposed to be fun?

5 Positive Lessons from Negative Comments

The media have been going wild this week covering Donald Trump's extreme and negative comments, focusing on how negative the comments were. My advice: Look at the substance of Trump's remarks--see what you can learn from them! Today I'm going to follow my own advice--not with Trump's comments, but with some negative comments I've received.

Can You Read a Language You Can’t Hear?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on July 20, 2015 in Talking Apes
Deaf learners face considerable obstacles to reading, but they also bring a unique skill set to the task.

Learning From the Inside Out

Learning from the inside out centers around the role of emotion in shaping our lives. Disney’s new film, Inside Out, presents current thinking in neuroscience in a format that allows animated characters to teach us how to live life.

Troublesome New Research About Sexual Assault Perpetrators?

By Shawn M. Burn Ph.D. on July 19, 2015 in Presence of Mind
Recent media reports of two studies on college sexual assault perpetrators distort the findings and their implications. What do these studies really tell us about college men's willingness to sexually assault and about the focus of sexual assault prevention programming?

Rwandan Stories of Change

Last week as part of our Rwandan Stories of Change Project we visited the Genocide Archive in Kigali

Language Precision Helps Us to Educate and Learn

Imprecise use of language often reflects cloudy thinking, causes further clouding, and can cause serious harm.

Signs and Symbols of Your Aging Process

Although transitions as we age seem more intimidating, changes can be exciting opportunities. Part of positive aging is the ability to feel strong, creative and open.

Why Do People Think You Can't Teach Creativity?

By Tina Seelig on July 16, 2015 in CreativityRulz
We’re each responsible for crafting our own lives and for repairing the broader problems of the world, but aren't taught the skills to do so. The Invention Cycle describes a clear set of tools for moving from inspiration to implementation, providing guidance for charting a path toward the life you dream to live.

By Neglecting Spatial People, What Innovations Have We Lost?

Peter Thiel famously said of the future: “We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters.” As innovative as Twitter might be, it pales in comparison to engineering feats that could truly transform our future. And by neglecting spatially talented people, we may have already lost so many incredible inventions.

The Color Kittens: Best Children's Book Ever

The Color Kittens, perhaps more than Timothy Leary and The Beatles, may be responsible for generations of youth saying "It's the colors, man" while looking at psychedelic visions. The Color Kittens continues to capture my heart and my imagination because there is something about the sheer messiness of discovery and creativity that Hush and Brush that's perfect in its chaos

Resilience: The Capacity to Rebuild and Grow from Adversity

Resilience is not a genetic trait. It is derived from the ways children learn to think and act when they are faced with obstacles, large and small. How do teachers cultivate resilience in the classroom?

How Asking Tough Questions Could Save Your Career

By Hal Gregersen on July 13, 2015 in The Curiosity Deficit
Had Kodak’s leaders ratcheted up their discomfort level by asking more challenging questions from others, it may well have sustained its legacy as a key industry player.

Some Advice for First-Time College Students and Parents

By Dana S Dunn Ph.D. on July 13, 2015 in Head of the Class
It's normal for first time college students and their parents to be a little jittery about this exciting transition and there are things to think about and to do that can make it a good one.