Depression Essential Reads

A New Way to Understand the Narcissistic Male

Pathologically narcissistic men often engage in high-risk behavior, aggression, and substance abuse. New research focuses on their feelings of distress and need for treatment.

Is Facebook Making You Depressed?

Long a concern of psychologists studying Facebook use, the possibility of users become depressed comes under scrutiny in newly published research.

Psilocybin May "Reset" Brain Circuitry of Depressed Patients

By Christopher Bergland on October 13, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Psilocybin may help "kick-start" recovery from treatment-resistant depression by "resetting" neural mechanisms, according to new fMRI brain imaging study.

How Helping Others Can Relieve Anxiety and Depression

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on October 10, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
A new study shows that thinking of others' well-being may be more beneficial than trying to boost our self-image.

The Black Woman’s Guide to Getting Help for PPD

The hit comedy Black-ish tackles postpartum depression in a mom of color. If you are struggling, here is how to break the "strong black woman" stereotype and get help now.

Friendship at Work Can Be Tricky, But Also Life-Saving

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on October 10, 2017 in Feeling It
Friendships at work are critical for happiness and success - but you have to manage them with skill

Can Exercise Prevent Depression?

By Emily Deans M.D. on October 07, 2017 in Evolutionary Psychiatry
A large group of healthy individuals in Norway may have staved off depression with a small but regular amount of exercise. What does this tell us about how exercise might work?

Seeking Redemption: The Rage of Alzheimer’s

By Greg O'Brien on October 04, 2017 in On Pluto
Profane language can be common in Alzheimer’s. An expression of gut rage and loss of filter, along with inadvertent grabbing, kicking, pushing, and throwing.

One Hour of Exercise Per Week Protects Against Depression

By Christopher Bergland on October 03, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
60 minutes of easy physical activity per week—without becoming breathless or sweating—can protect against future depression, according to a new landmark study.

The Hidden Effects of Respiratory Diseases

Anxiety, depression, and PTSD are more common in people that have lung diseases like COPD and asthma.

Why the Fear of Disappointment Is Detrimental to Your Life

By Jennice Vilhauer Ph.D. on September 27, 2017 in Living Forward
For many, giving up on their desires, hopes and dreams is preferable to coping with disappointment. Learn 3 ways to stop the fear of disappointment from limiting you.

Combatting the Loneliness of Transition

Five strategies to feel less lonely even in the midst of transition.

Why Your Mind is Better than Pills at Conquering Pain

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on September 26, 2017 in Feeling It
Conquering pain and stress with the mind is not only possible—it's powerful.

Inositol and Choline in Mental Health Care

Are you curious about inositol, choline and other B vitamins in mental health care? Emerging findings suggest these vitamins may reduce symptoms of depressed mood and anxiety.

The Lonely College Student

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on September 24, 2017 in Social Lights
A professor's advice for students and parents.

B Vitamins Play Important Roles in Mental Health Care

Are you curious about the role of vitamin supplementation in mental health? B vitamins may help reduce symptoms of alcohol abuse, depressed mood, cognitive impairment and dementia.

The Power of Wake

By David Hellerstein M.D. on September 22, 2017 in Heal Your Brain
College students commonly "get high and pull all-nighters." Can researchers study college students gone wild to treat depression and other disorders?
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Your Teen Needs More Sleep

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on September 21, 2017 in Sleep Newzzz
A game plan for helping teens sleep better.

5 Simple Steps for Suicide Prevention

This week, National Suicide Prevention Week, it seems particularly appropriate to talk about both the good and the evidence-based.

What Does It Take to Survive Emotionally After a Disaster?

Disasters bring out a variety of emotional reactions. New research shows the importance of dealing with your basic emotions in order to insure your long-term emotional survival.
LoriNewman/USarmy/WikimediaCommons

What Suicide Survivors Want You to Know

Parents and loved ones of those who have died by suicide share their personal stories. Learn some of the warning signs and how you can help.

Bipolar Disorder and Expectations About the Future

By Elizabeth Brondolo Ph.D. on September 10, 2017 in Take Control
I thought I could handle things, but bipolar really interferes.
K. Ramsland

Suicide Shrines

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on September 10, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
Some locations or events can inspire numerous life-ending acts. The allure might be obvious or obscure.

Does Your Child Have Enough Friends?

By Michael Ungar Ph.D. on September 10, 2017 in Nurturing Resilience
Some children are shy and happy to be alone. Many others struggle to make friends and are at risk for depression. Parents can teach children what they need to be more social.
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Your Set Point for Happiness

By Robert Puff Ph.D. on September 08, 2017 in Meditation for Modern Life
No matter what life throws at us, over time our happiness tends to bounce back to the same point.

The Link Between Sugar And Depression: What You Should Know

By David DiSalvo on September 02, 2017 in Neuronarrative
The connection between excess sugar and depression is becoming increasingly clear.

Be the One to Help Save a Life from Suicide

By Lisa Firestone Ph.D. on September 01, 2017 in Compassion Matters
In a given lifetime, all of us will likely encounter someone in crisis. That's why it’s so important to know what we can do to help.
Pixabay public domain

The Suicide Prevention Hotline: Find It in This Rap Song

By Monica N. Starkman M.D. on August 29, 2017 in On Call
Can a rap song help save a life? Yes, when it's '1-800-273-8255’

What You Need to Know About Stress and Self-Care

By Dan Mager MSW on August 29, 2017 in Some Assembly Required
Like other repetitive experiences, long-term stress rewires the brain, leaving you more vulnerable to fear, anxiety, depression, and yes, more stress. But, there are solutions.

Does Testosterone Contribute to Men's Postpartum Depression?

By Darby Saxbe Ph.D. on August 26, 2017 in Home Base
Postpartum depression can affect dads as well as moms. Testosterone might play a role—and has some surprising consequences for the well-being of fathers and their partners.