Essential Reads

Can a Building Make You Sad?

New tools can help us to understand the emotional impact of buildings.

4 Ways to Keep Your Perfectionism from Getting You Down

Get over that constant striving for perfection with these 4 helpful tips

Is it the Baby Blues or Postpartum Depression?

How to know when you need help

Recent Posts on Depression

Saving Lives from Suicide

By Lisa Firestone Ph.D. on August 27, 2015 in Compassion Matters
Making it more difficult for someone to access the means for suicide can provide them the time and space necessary, to awaken from the suicidal trance, to get to the help they need and, ultimately, save their lives. So, how can we get people to the help they need? What can we do on an individual level to help prevent suicide?

More Thoughts on the Wound with No Name—First Aid

There are rarely any quick fixes when the wounds are deep, especially from early childhood and/or in combination with being highly sensitive. But what might help, right now?

My Daughter Steals And Lies

By Barbara Greenberg Ph.D. on August 25, 2015 in The Teen Doctor
How To Manage Defiant Daughter

Speaking Up for Yourself, Part 1

The idea of boundaries feels like I may be asking them to put up a wall, to keep others away or just be alone without anyone near them.If you are depressed the idea of creating boundaries that separate you would make you feel much worse.

When Working Shifts Works Against You

By Shelby Harris Psy.D. on August 25, 2015 in The Land of Nod
A discussion of Shift Work Sleep Disorder

The Best Clinical Story Ever?

Great clinical stories teach us how to think, they liberate the mind from its ruts, and most importantly thy raise the bar of excellence to counter complacency and mediocrity.

How the "Bonding Potion” Oxytocin May Cure Anorexia Nervosa

Oxytocin is widely known as the bonding hormone for its effects on love and lust between two people in a relationship. Many studies have been performed to determine whether this love potion can aid in psychological disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and depression.Oxytocin is making a big impact in science and is currently being researched to treat eating disorders.

Shy, Sensitive, Introverted…and Narcissistic?

By Linda Esposito LCSW on August 24, 2015 in From Anxiety to Zen
The Shy/Covert Narcissistic personality is overcome with worry, ineffective functioning, unfulfilled expectations, and hypersensitivity to stress.

Anxious America

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on August 23, 2015 in Hidden Motives
We spend over 2 billion dollars a year on anti-anxiety medications. What are we so anxious about?

Can a Building Make You Sad?

By Colin Ellard Ph.D. on August 22, 2015 in Mind Wandering
Time worn principles in architecture suggest that we might like buildings that mirror the proportions and harmonies of the human form. But what about faces? New research shows how computer analysis of building facades might be used to show how face-like images on the surfaces of buildings affect our emotions.

4 Ways to Keep Your Perfectionism from Getting You Down

Always wanting your life, and everything in it, to be perfect can become a thankless enterprise. In addition to the fact that perfection is almost impossible to achieve, striving for the ideal can cause your stress levels to mount. These 4 tips will help you keep perfectionism under control.

My Daughter Can't Handle College

By Barbara Greenberg Ph.D. on August 20, 2015 in The Teen Doctor
What to do about daughter's inability to manage her life

After a Suicide Tragedy, Will There Be Copycats?

A recently published study entitled 'One followed by many?--Long-term effects of a celebrity suicide on the number of suicidal acts on the German railway net', found the number of railway suicidal acts, in the following two weeks, more than doubled in Germany.

The Importance of Sex While Raising The Special Needs Child

By Lisa Thomas LMFT on August 19, 2015 in Save Your Sex Life
Sex & Raising The Special Needs Child

Forgiveness, Acceptance, Compassion -- and Suicide

I don’t write these words -- acceptance, forgiveness, compassion -- as if they are tiny words, like ‘it’ or ‘to.’ They are enormous words, like ‘and’ or ‘but.’ In them lies tremendous potential, so much unknown.

Screentime Is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy

By Victoria L. Dunckley M.D. on August 18, 2015 in Mental Wealth
By disrupting sleep, suppressing the brain's frontal lobe, raising stress hormones, and fracturing attention, daily screen-time is making children become the worst version of themselves.

"Why is Mommy so Sad?"

By Martha Manning on August 18, 2015 in Living With Depression
Within a family, depression is a gift that keeps on giving. Living with a depressed parent alters a child's current experience. Disturbingly, it puts the child at risk for developing anxiety and depression disorders later on, in adolescence and young adulthood. For these reasons, it is extremely important to attend to their adjustment during this stressful time.

What to Do When Life Hurts

By Leslie Becker-Phelps Ph.D. on August 18, 2015 in Making Change
Adversity can cut deep, like a psychic dagger. The pain is real, and the psychic scar can last a lifetime. While you probably wouldn’t choose adversity, you can choose how to respond to it. You can choose to listen to what it has to teach and to be better in some way for the lessons it offers.

Grief Out Of Order: Apocalyptic Loss and "The Walking Dead"

"The Walking Dead" demonstrates how stages of grief follow no universal order. Before we discover how new characters on "Fear the Walking Dead" respond to the zombie apocalyse, look back at how one of the original program's characters faced loss and bereavement. What do these reactions mean for ongoing survival in a complicated world? What might Kübler-Ross say?

Countering "I'm Bitter" Syndrome

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 17, 2015 in How To Do Life
When life has beaten you down, you can be embittered. Here's possible help.

Beware the Witch-hunt: Depression, Pilots and Air Crashes

Should pilots undertake regular psychological assessment? And how to make it accurate and reliable?

Can Twitter Predict Who Will Develop Postpartum Depression?

Research shows that artificial intelligence can monitor a woman's Twitter feed during pregnancy and predict with 80% accuracy whether she will go on to develop postpartum depression.

Inside the Mind of the Pilot who Flies to Crash

While the German co-pilot’s motives remain mysterious, clues as to his psychology are being dissected, including the suggestions reported in the media that he appears to have flown fewer hours than would be expected given the career stage reached, plus he seems to have taken a mysterious break of several months in the middle of his training.

The Psychology of Regret

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on August 14, 2015 in A Sideways View
There is nothing like shortage of time to concentrate the mind. Those who have looked back in their final months of life and written about things have a lot to teach us.

Suicide: It’s Time to Break Taboos

The suicide taboo, which has deep roots in our culture, has concealed a sad reality: that it can affect anyone at any time of life, regardless of socioeconomic status, age, race, gender or religion.

AA Saved My Life and I Get Why You Hate It

By Anna David on August 13, 2015 in After Party Chat
I thought the only way to tackle alcoholism was through AA. I was wrong. But so are those who stake entire careers on railing against the program.

Bicycle Days

By David Ludden Ph.D. on August 13, 2015 in Talking Apes
We, as a society, have convinced ourselves that we have to ride a motorized vehicle everywhere we go. Even when walking or biking would be faster, we tell ourselves that driving is safer. Yet our love affair with cars—as well as our dread of physical exertion—underlies our national epidemic of obesity and depression.

Countering Sad Business Owner Syndrome

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 13, 2015 in How To Do Life
Small business owners don't have it easy. Perhaps these ideas will help.

Countering Sad Artist Syndrome

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on August 12, 2015 in How To Do Life
Artistic people have reason for malaise but there are solutions.

Complicated Grief and the Inner Clock

By Michael Terman Ph.D. on August 11, 2015 in Chronotherapy
For some bereaved individuals, grief turns from an emotion into an illness that can last months or years—and causes neurological changes that can be detected on an MRI. Find out more about complicated grief and the effects it can have on your sleep and circadian rhythms.