Essential Reads

Interdisciplinary Education and the Student Voice

By Michael Hogan Ph.D. on April 20, 2017 in In One Lifespan
Interdisciplinary education and practice implies certain qualities. Students highlight the importance of four qualities: openness, creativity, bridging, and perspective-taking.
Source: Wikimedia

The Collaborative Error That's Killing Innovation

By John Nosta on April 17, 2017 in The Digital Self
The problem with conventional collaboration is that it often drives us to more of an intellectual average than to true innovation.

Imagination Helps You Be Patient

A new study finds that imagination trumps willpower when it comes to waiting for bigger payoffs — but is choosing to wait for a larger reward always in your best interest?

Speeding Up Your Creativity by Slowing Down

New research on making creative headway through attentive looking

More Posts on Creativity

The World’s First Music Therapist

By David M. Greenberg on April 27, 2017 in The Power of Music
A search into unexpected texts reveals an early account of music therapy dating back several thousand years.

Daily Routines of Creative People

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on April 27, 2017 in Hot Thought
Most people have daily routines and rituals. According to a recent book, mornings are important productive times for many famous writers and other creative people.

Mona Haydar Speaks Your Language

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 26, 2017 in Brick by Brick
Haydar is no ordinary artist, and the concept behind Haydar’s first single, “Hijabi,” is anything but common.

Life of Agony Never Stopped Dreaming

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 24, 2017 in Brick by Brick
“The most fond memories I have from the old days are of Joey and I sitting at his mom’s kitchen table in the middle of the night, eating pasta, drawing on a notebook our stage plan

Play: A Different Perspective

Much has been studied and written about play, and we would like to consider play from a somewhat different perspective, namely, that of affect theory.

Why Do Some Women Know How to Handle Men?

By Sheila Kohler on April 22, 2017 in Dreaming for Freud
Yet when our teacher asked us how many of us would like to marry Heathcliff (the Byronic hero in "Wuthering Heights") all the hands shot up. Obviously we were in for trouble.
Photo by the author

The Risk of Stroke and Dementia Masked by Simple Colors

By John Nosta on April 21, 2017 in The Digital Self
New data suggest that sugar substitutes might be dangerous. The trick is to hide this issue with simple and powerful branding.

10 Reasons Why Silence Really Is Golden

Could the answer to improved health be as simple as silence?

Consciously Consuming Media and Narratives

By Barnet Bain on April 20, 2017 in Doing and Being
Are messages and media wearing you down? Here are some ways to approach it.

Why I Sing

By Jennifer Hamady on April 20, 2017 in Finding Your Voice
What drives you to express yourself? Often, the joy and passion that once started us on our creative journeys get covered over by fear and perfectionism. It's time to let that go.

How Do Work Breaks Help Your Brain? 5 Surprising Answers

By Meg Selig on April 18, 2017 in Changepower
Work smarter. Take a break! Discover 5 reasons why work breaks can lift your productivity, creativity, and motivation...as well as your spirits.

The Gestalt of Zeal and Ardor

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 18, 2017 in Brick by Brick
Manuel Gagneux is one raw and confrontational motherfucker.
Orangefox/Pixabay

Can Paying Attention to Dreams Increase Creativity?

By Thomas Ward Ph.D. on April 18, 2017 in Creativity for You
Do you reflect on your dreams when you wake up in the morning? Would it help you to think more creatively if you did?
https://pixabay.com/en/to-write-machine-desk-flowers-1700787/

How About Writing Confessional Poetry?

By Diana Raab Ph.D. on April 17, 2017 in The Empowerment Diary
Have you always wanted to write a poem, but don't know how to begin? Do you have a secret or confession to write about? April as National Poetry Month is a good time to start.

Fallingwater: Where Design, Structure, & Psychology Converge

Asked to describe Fallingwater in one word, its owner replied, "Romance." Frank Lloyd Wright used design and structure to evoke psychological reactions.

17 Ways to Foster Creativity in a Practical Kid

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on April 09, 2017 in Creating in Flow
Does your child show little interest in the usual arts and crafts? Some kids are most passionate about how the real world works, and can be remarkably creative. You can help.

How Much Truth Should We Tell Our Children

By Sheila Kohler on April 08, 2017 in Dreaming for Freud
In my own case, writing a memoir about my sister's death I have been accused by some of what one writer on amazon called "Revenge Porn."

So You Want to Write/Edit an Art Therapy Book

It's not as difficult to get a publisher as you imagine—really. But is that a good thing for the field of art therapy?

Thinking Beyond the Third Dimension

By Gayil Nalls Ph.D. on April 07, 2017 in Sensoria
What mathematicians know to be true is astounding, and none of it informs any of the discussions we're having.
https://pixabay.com/en/hawaii-plumeria-tropical-flower-2042053/

The Passionate Art of Storytelling

By Diana Raab Ph.D. on April 06, 2017 in The Empowerment Diary
Do you feel as isolated from people and their stories? Do you have difficulty telling stories? Here are some reasons why sharing stories unites us, and how to tell a story.

Toward a Quantum Model of Humor

By Liane Gabora Ph.D. on April 06, 2017 in Mindbloggling
The bisociation of incongruous frames or word meanings in jokes is modelled as a linear superposition of basis states, or possible interpretations, in a complex Hilbert space.

What’s in a Name?

By Molly S. Castelloe Ph.D. on April 05, 2017 in The Me in We
How does one's name influence identity and guide one's destiny?

Superhero Psychology Resources

Students and journalists keep requesting info on superhero psychology. These sources use psychology to look at superhero fiction and use the fiction to explain real psychology.

You Use "You" to Make Meaning Out of Misery

A recent study shows that a perennial pet peeve of English teachers actually serves a useful psychological function.
Simon & Schuster

Pseudocide: The Art of Faking Your Death

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on April 04, 2017 in Shadow Boxing
Writer explores those who want to fake their deaths, those who hunt them down, those who fail and those who succeed. Everything you want to know but were afraid to ask.

A Practical Guide to Not Settling

What if the people that shape our world for the better are no smarter than we are – as Steve Jobs believed? How do they find the path to extraordinary accomplishment?

Write Better By Reading Better Books

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on April 01, 2017 in Creating in Flow
Some authors find they can't read other writers' work while they're creating their own. Others never stop reading and learning from the best. Eight new-ish novels to sink into.

My Three-Year-Old Failed an Academic Test: Should I worry?

In the early years, ‘school’ should be playful exploration, confidence-building, social development, emotional self-regulation, and play-based skill mastery. NOT drill and grill.

Dancing in the Face of Death

What response is possible to an event that is as horrific as the shootings at the Pulse nightclub?

Getting Education Right—For a Change

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on March 31, 2017 in Memory Medic
The most important thing you should learn in school is to learn how to learn.