Essential Reads

One More Reason to Unplug Before Bedtime

Reading a bedtime story improves a child's brain function and mental imagery.

The Secret to Teaching Creativity

How do you teach creativity?

Don't Aim for Happiness

Melancholy can't be avoided.

Metaphors in Therapy

A short animated video about how words change us

Recent Posts on Creativity

The Psychology of Online Customization

The decision to buy a customized product is mediated by a number of unconscious factors that shape the customers’ final decision.

The 'Other' Marshmallow Test

The tower building exercise - and its marshmallow - reveals another secret of successful human behavior, in this case for mental health professionals: when we put the goals of our patients first and foremost, they are going to be more effective, and so will we.

How to Completely Change Your Sex Life and Relationship

It's normal for a couple who has been together for a few years to fall into a stale and boring pattern. Our brains crave novelty. Stability and security is nice and comforting, but it’s not exciting. Instead of taking each other for granted and then going on Facebook looking up someone you dated high school, try being open and honest with each other. Hit the reset button.

How Similar Is Too Similar?

Does the song “Blurred Lines” by Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams sound similar to Marvin Gaye’s song “Got to Give It Up?” Does it sound so similar that it actually represents copyright infringement?

The Innovation Bucket List

By Moses Ma on March 12, 2015 in The Tao of Innovation
Creating an innovation bucket list is an exercise that can clarify your creative and innovation goals.

The Most Precious Gift My Mother Gave Me

By Sheila Kohler on March 12, 2015 in Dreaming for Freud
Perhaps the most precious gift I inherited from my mother, the one which led me to become a writer, was her silence about so many parts of her life, the mystery in which she wrapped herself—like a dark cloak—giving only brief glimpses of her true self from time to time.

Using Art to 'Touch' Someone in a Juvenile Detention Center

Guest blogger and artist Elise Lunsford describes a unique and creative approach to promote reconnection and healing with a difficult client in a juvenile detention facility. In forensic settings, clinicians are warned not to touch the inmates. She demonstrates that art can allow us to reach out and touch those who therapists would otherwise hesitate to touch.

How Over-Thinking Kills Your Performance

By Gregory Ciotti on March 11, 2015 in Habits, Not Hacks
Why assessing your performance will often steer you wrong.

An Amish Surprise: Solving the Bipolar Puzzle

Do you know what Abraham Lincoln, Vincent Van Gogh, Ernest Hemingway and Marilyn Monroe have in common? If you guessed they all had bipolar disorder, you’re right.

Is There a Link Between Intelligence and Mental Illness?

Plagued by mental health disorders such as depression, bipolar polar disorder, and schizophrenia, are a host of artists, writers and famous people throughout history.

Enter the Epiphany Machine

By Kaja Perina on March 10, 2015 in Brainstorm
Struggle, whether creative or emotional, can be a trapdoor to another place entirely.

Barry Beck Finds His Purpose Bringing Hockey To China

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on March 10, 2015 in Brick by Brick
For the past 7 years, Barry Beck, a former NHL All-Star and capitan of the New York Rangers, has aimed to expand the sport of ice hockey. As a mentor and coach at the Hong Kong Academy of Ice Hockey, he has broken down barriers for the sport and developed a culture of growth and development for over 25,000 children.

What My Son Has Taught Me About Autism and Parenting

By Stephen Borgman on March 10, 2015 in Spectrum Solutions
Here's a simple way to improve your parenting on the autism spectrum.

The Book That Changed My Life

By Sheila Kohler on March 09, 2015 in Dreaming for Freud
I first encountered Proust’s work in what might be considered rather adverse yet somewhat Proustian circumstances. He was a favorite writer of my ex-husband and his southern mother who had discovered Proust on her own in the library in Kentucky where she had taken out Scott Montcrieff’s translation of Remembrance of Things past, and read it by chance.

The Brave New World of Connectional Intelligence

By Tim Leberecht on March 09, 2015 in The Romance of Work
Connectional intelligence highlights an evolution that has been quietly taking place across workplaces all over the world—just like traditional intelligence is “out,” so is the old way of working. It’s a whole new world in more ways than one; there’s less emphasis on conventional hierarchies, more on reshaping office environments and workdays for improved collaboration.

Why We're in Need of Music

In Arthur C. Clarke’s novel Childhood’s End, a highly cerebral species of aliens known as the Overlords have been studying the human race from their spaceship, but they have encountered one puzzle they cannot solve. Why do humans spend so much of their time playing with, listening to, and preoccupied by meaningless tonal patterns—something the humans call music?

An Unforgettable Zen Story About "Letting Go"

You do not need to forgive a bad action that the other person hasn't repaired. You do need to move on.

Creativity and Mental Illness

Creating and creativity are healthy processes in contradiction to contentions such as those of Kay Jamison and Nancy Andreasen and others who have carried out weak research purportedly showing connections between creativity and mental illness.

Five Ways to Access Your Unconscious Intelligence

Overthinking kills our intuitive sense. Find out how to relax and trust your gut feelings to your and other people's benefit. Soon enough, you are going to burst with creative solutions....

Why is the Glass Ceiling Shatterproof?

By Ray Williams on March 07, 2015 in Wired for Success
While there are many individual accomplishments to celebrate the overall picture is not rosy, particularly in the U.S. The glass ceiling is still shatterproof.

The Female Artist in Society

By Molly S. Castelloe Ph.D. on March 07, 2015 in The Me in We
"Do women have to be naked to get into the Metropolitan Museum?” ask the Gorilla Girls.

7 Habits of Highly Effective Sleuths

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on March 07, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
People who ponder puzzles, whether writers, investigators, photographers, or physicians, will benefit from turning these skills into habits.

Mindfulness and Cultivating Creativity

Creativity relies, in part, on the brain being in a state of unfocused, resting wakefulness, similar to that found in certain types of mediation and mindfulness practice. So, when you're at rest, are you actually working?

Culture Matters! How Cultural Knowledge Influences Language

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on March 06, 2015 in Language in the Mind
Culture, along with language and mind, form a golden triangle; their symbiotic interleaving enables the prodigious meaning-making capacity of our species.

Tomas Tranströmer’s Avocational Polymathy

Scratch beneath the surface of just about any successful career in science, art, or human affairs and you’re sure to find wide-ranging interests. We’ve been scratching through the memoirs and biographies of Nobel Prize winners. No surprise, avocational polmathy, aka the several-hats tactic, turns up time and again. Tomas Tranströmer provides a case in point.

Dreams and Narrative

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on March 06, 2015 in Dream Catcher
Why are dreams like stories? Because they are made to be interpreted.

Psychosis Sucks!

By Joe Pierre M.D. on March 05, 2015 in Psych Unseen
Does the British Psychological Society's recently published monograph called "Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia" dangerously romanticize mental illness? Here's why psychiatrists say yes.

The Importance and Relevance of CTE

Career Technical Education (CTE) makes education relevant and important. One goal for CTE is to put individual students to work to achieve success defined in a number of ways, including earnings and quality of life. A second goal is to provide the skilled labor force to enable America to maintain its place in the world economy.

Dinner for the Dying: Last Suppers

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on March 04, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
Art exhibit in Dayton features paintings of inmates' final meals; artist Julie Green describes her process.

Psychology Poems for the Month of March

Listen first, hear a blur… Get clues, listen twice, words are heard! Top-down: it filters.