Essential Reads

Don't Aim for Happiness

Melancholy Can't Be Avoided and if You Try It Will Be Worse

Metaphors in Therapy

A short animated video about how words change us

Getting Existential with Josh Rouse

Musician Uses Mindfulness to Manage Anxiety

Cities Are Green After All

Agriculture fingered as key source of global warming.

Recent Posts on Creativity

Q&A With Dawn Raffel: The Secret Life of Objects

By Jennifer Haupt on June 08, 2012 in One True Thing
"My house is filled with simple possessions that are meaningful to me because they are suffused with memory. Some are emblematic of passages in my life; others are remembrances of people who are gone, or children who have grown. I wanted to write about the objects now, before some of those memories evaporate."

He Said That? How Men Speak to Mating Women

By Vinita Mehta Ph.D., Ed.M. on June 08, 2012 in Head Games
"Language was invented for one purpose...to woo women,” according to Robin Williams' character in the film Dead Poets Society. Indeed, men are wont to creative displays when trying to signal sexual interest to a woman. A recent study investigated this dynamic further: do men speak with more flair to women during ovulation, when the mating dance reaches a fever pitch?

Can a Genius's Life Be Laugh-Out-Loud Funny?

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on June 08, 2012 in Creating in Flow
A delightful book about a reclusive math genius explores the person beyond the stereotype.

The Bike

Schwinn 1963 Stingray. Treasures hidden by addiction.

The Parent Trap

Every morning Marcie would repeatedly tell her 6-year-old son Evan to get dressed for school. And every morning she would walk into his room to find Evan lying half-naked on the floor, one unlaced shoe on, daydreaming. What was his problem?

Advice from the Late Great Ray Bradbury: Be an "Optimalist"

By Richard Louv on June 06, 2012 in People in Nature
So you don't like to be thought of as a science-fiction writer, said the reporter to the great writer. "No," said Ray Bradbury, who called back after the fax had rolled in. The fax machine is one of his only concessions to post-modern technology. "Have you noticed that we have all these machines but no one calls anymore?" he added.

Mirror Neurons Firing at the House of Blues

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on June 06, 2012 in Play in Mind
It’s Friday night and in dozens of American cities fans make their way to a blues dive. It could be Chicago, or St. Louis, or Austin, but in this case for me it’s Buffalo, where the guitarist is as brilliant and soulful as Clapton and arguably as skilled.

Mental Simulations

By Michael Hogan Ph.D on June 05, 2012 in In One Lifespan
Many of us are comfortable with the belief that analogy plays an important role in the creativity process. But the ongoing debate as regards the existence of mental imagery has some of us feeling uncomfortable in relation to the mental images — the visions and simulations — we see and use during acts of creation.

How a Good Mood Ramps Up Creativity

By Polly Campbell on June 05, 2012 in Imperfect Spirituality
You want to be a little more creative? Take a minute to watch a funny film clip or listen to music that makes you feel good.

Patient-Centered Hospital Design = People + Place

By Toby Israel Ph.D. on June 05, 2012 in Design on My Mind
Is our angst about the physical and psychological importance of hospital design needless?

Author Nichole Bernier Contemplates Faith, Rejection, and Motherhood.

By Jennifer Haupt on June 05, 2012 in One True Thing
"Hope, like happiness, can come in the most unexpected ways. It’s true of raising children, and it’s true of the writing life."

Drew Barrymore, Sober Winemaking Newlywed

By Stanton Peele on June 05, 2012 in Addiction in Society
How did Drew Barrymore become both sober and a vintner? Well, in the first place, it depends how you define sobriety. Then, there's her life success.

Using Art Therapy to Re-Author the Dominant Narrative of Illness

Just how does art therapy make a difference in the lives of people confronted with a medical illness or physical disability? It gives us a chance to imagine a new story.

The Art of Positive Skepticism

While most of our ideas and accomplishments will never be compared to the greatest minds in history, we can help ourselves and our children develop the same habits of thinking that helped Galileo and Jobs discover truth and create innovation. Welcome to the world of the skeptic!

Ariadne's Thread - The One, Male "Deal-breaker" in Relationships

Ancient myths might speak to universal behaviors in more than a gender-neutral way, and while women have many "deal-breakers" on whether to date or marry a man, there is one major "deal-breaker" that men carry around in their own unconscious minds regarding commitment. Ariadne's Thread is the only cure.

The Most American Thing in America

By Jeff DeGraff Ph.D. on June 04, 2012 in Innovation You
While perfection is praised in most cultures where the steady hand paints the smooth line and polishes the shinning gear, there are some that value novelty instead. Their customs are frenetic and clumsy - a work in progress never fully realized.

There Was a Great Doc From Nantucket...

By Dennis Rosen M.D. on June 04, 2012 in Sleeping Angels
Pam Belluck's beautifully written "Island Practice" tells the true story of one of Nantucket's most storied physicians.

How to Tell if You're a Real Author

Look, I brush my teeth twice a day but that doesn’t make me a dentist. I cook dinner five nights a week but that doesn’t make me a chef. And having an idea for a novel doesn't make me a novelist.

Where Have All the Sigmund's Gone?

By Mack R. Hicks Ph.D. on June 04, 2012 in Digital Pandemic
I was recently asked to speak to faculty and students at the Department of Clinical Psychology where I received my training many years ago. Prior to the lecture, I viewed a picture of a psychology club picnic and saw only one male student.

America in a Lost Decade

By Moses Ma on June 04, 2012 in The Tao of Innovation
America is now immersed in a "lost decade" caused by deflationary price expectations. Here's a tip about how America can fight its way out of it.

How a Rapist/Murderer Nearly Got Away With It

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on June 03, 2012 in Creating in Flow
The true story of a young woman who vanished in a foreign city, and the fascinating and bizarre investigation that followed.

Can You Be Powerful?

By Marcia Reynolds Psy.D. on June 02, 2012 in Wander Woman
Do you hesitate calling yourself powerful? You don't have to appear tough to have power. Read the list of powers you can use and then determine how best you can use each of them for the different situations you face.

When "Zombies" Come to Life

I was delighted when Tim Ward asked me to write a review of his book about his seven-day trek up and down Mount Kilimanjaro with his son Josh. I know what an arduous adventure it is. So I was curious, what did the Ward duo discover?

What Should You Do if You Make a Mistake?

By Donna Barstow on June 01, 2012 in Ink Blots Cartoons
What if you make the wrong choice? What if disaster lies just around the corner, and it's all your fault? This cartoon has one solution. (Not necessarily the best one).

Awakening The Compassionate Mind

A blog exploring Compassion Focused Therapy, and the power of compassion in psychotherapy and everyday life.

The Tell-Tale Brain

By Michael Hogan Ph.D on May 31, 2012 in In One Lifespan
In his incredibly insightful, entertaining, and thought-provoking new book, The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Quest For What Makes Us Human, Ramachandran begins by challenging readers to consider Disreali’s rhetorical question, “Is man an ape or angel?”

The ADHD Maverick: An Interview with Jennifer Koretsky

Learn more about the concept of the ADHD adult as Maverick. An interview with Jennifer Koretsky, ADHD coach and author.

The Sound of Silence

By Maureen Seaberg on May 31, 2012 in Sensorium
Lidell Simpson is deaf, but he has never known a day of silence in his life.

The Shadow

You may be lonely, but you are never alone. Inside each of us is a second self, another being. The great Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung, named this hidden part of us the Shadow.