Essential Reads

Treating Road Rage: A Free-Range Approach

How a hawaiian shirt, the music of Gabby Pahinui, and a lump of coconut-scented surf wax helped cure a case of road rage
ID 18120787 © Peto Zvonar | Dreamstime.com

Here’s How Creative Arts Can Diminish Stress

While there’s no way for you to avoid stress entirely, you can use it to your advantage and harness its energy to create meaningful artistic expressions.

Exercising Our Freedom and Intelligence: Part 8

By Michael Hogan Ph.D. on August 19, 2016 in In One Lifespan
The future is uncertain. There is little doubt about that. Scenario-based collective intelligence design may help us to shape the future, specifically, through our innovations.

The Practical Benefits of a Wandering Mind

The next time you’re trying to concentrate and find your mind wandering off task, you might just want to let it go. New research suggests it may be helping you achieve your goals.

More Posts on Creativity

How to Hire a Gardening Mentor

By Jennifer Haupt on July 29, 2016 in One True Thing
I had a love/hate relationship with my garden. So I hired someone who could teach me the basics of how to spend less time digging in the dirt and get better results.

Behave!

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on July 27, 2016 in Trouble in Mind
A series about the ethical standards of different fictional biographies and factual biographies of famous psychologists and scientists.The first is on John Watson & Rosalie Rayner

Free-Range Psychology

Just as the heath care field is moving towards personalized medicine, free-range psychology is well positioned to be the wave of the future.

Art Thinking or The Importance of Inventing Point B

By Tim Leberecht on July 25, 2016 in The Romance of Work
Business is too important to be left to business people. What if companies thought and acted more like artists?

Leslie Jones Is a Movie Star Who Makes Me Laugh and Cry

The more diversity of characters and actors we see on our stages and screens, the more opportunities we can create for identification and empathy between one another.
Xalid Demoza/FreeImages

Is Your School Helping or Hurting Your Child’s Literacy?

Reading is key to success. Five common teaching practices that don't work; and six ways to support kids in acquiring a love of reading that encourages learning across the lifespan.

How Much Can We Borrow from One Another?

By Sheila Kohler on July 21, 2016 in Dreaming for Freud
Isaac Newton reportedly said back in 1676: "If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."

Thinking Visually With DeAngela Napier

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in Brick by Brick
DeAngela Napier is a visual thinker. Napier, who works as a photographer, video producer and editor, thinks of her work as visual storytelling...

The Writing Life: An Interview With Natalie Goldberg

By Mark Matousek on July 19, 2016 in Ethical Wisdom
The groundbreaking author of Writing Down the Bones talks about creativity as a spiritual practice, her cancer journey, and choosing passion over discipline

Aliens and Monsters

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on July 19, 2016 in Play in Mind
Science fiction authors always mean to open readers’ eyes wider, intending to broaden their perspective.

The Beautiful Randomness of the Band Suicide

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 18, 2016 in Brick by Brick
When describing hardcore punk music, Lester Bangs wrote that “hardcore is the womb.”

Play Foul and Fair

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on July 14, 2016 in Play in Mind
Rule breakers come in three varieties: the cheater, the spoilsport, and the game changer. We despise the first, we puzzle over the second, and usually, we admire the third.

Two Psychological Approaches to Photography

By Stanton Peele on July 14, 2016 in Addiction in Society
The two greatest American photographers, Diane Arbus and Robert Frank, while taking very different approaches to photography, both peered into America's soul, at a personal cost.

Dissecting Sheldon Cooper

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on July 13, 2016 in Media Spotlight
If you've seen even a single episode of the hit sitcom, The Big Bang Theory, then you're familiar with Dr. Sheldon Cooper. Understanding the antics of an eccentric genius.
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Creating Fictional Worlds That Feel Real

By Laura Otis Ph.D. on July 13, 2016 in Rethinking Thought
When you read a novel, do you know what color hair each characters has?

Measuring the Muse

By Sunil Iyengar on July 13, 2016 in The Value of Art
For the most compelling proofs of the arts’ benefits on individuals, one looks increasingly to cognitive and developmental psychology.

Why We Still Love ‘Please Kill Me’

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 13, 2016 in Brick by Brick
In “Please Kill Me,” Gillian McCain and Legs McNeil have delivered to their readers one of the most important ingredients of effective therapy - unconditional positive regard

The Case for Copying

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 08, 2016 in How To Do Life
Why rote learning such as memorizing and copying is underrated.

Write Better by Thinking Like a Fox

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on July 06, 2016 in Creating in Flow
Two new novels demonstrate, by showing not telling, how to get into the mind of some unusual characters.

The Best Book for Serious (And Humor) Writers

Advises Lerner, "If you are a writer, especially one who has been unable to make your work count or stick, you must grab your demons by the neck and face them down."

Creativity and the Importance of the Incubation Period

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on July 06, 2016 in A Sideways View
Reports on creativity suggest that after working hard, the best advice is to stop. The "aha" experience often comes in the shower, while cycling to work, or walking the dog.
Josephine Ensign

Writing Through Trauma

On writing and living through complex trauma.
Pixabay

Writing Your Narrative From Trauma to Addiction: 4 Prompts

As an advocate of writing for healing, my experience has shown that childhood trauma can lead to addiction in adulthood. Writing one's story is a way to heal. Blog offers tips.

How You Think of Creativity Matters!

Are you too fixed in your beliefs about creativity?

"Peripatetic Meetings" Promote Health and Creative Thinking

New research shows that holding a "peripatetic meeting" (in which you walk instead of sit) improves physical well-being and boosts creativity.

Superfluidity: The Science and Psychology of Optimizing Flow

Have you ever had a 'flow' experience that felt as if you were "standing outside yourself"? The science and psychology of 'superfluidity' help to explain the highest tier of flow.

Obey the Flower: Lessons Learned From Drawing a Rose

How a practice of drawing roses helped me appreciate the transformative power of beauty.

Patriotic Music and Cultural Identity

How is it that music can be such a strong carrier of cultural identity? Examining music’s function in our lives may provide a clue.

Playing Around Is Good

By Bernard L. De Koven on June 30, 2016 in On Having Fun
To "play around with no particular end in mind" can be the very pathway to discovery.

How Wonder Plays a Key Role in Collaboration

By Jeffrey Davis M.A. on June 29, 2016 in Tracking Wonder
Creative professionals often think they must suffer their projects alone. They’re often mistaken. Collaboration is essential for creative productivity and innovation.