Essential Reads

7 Ways to Mitigate Self-Doubt

Release negative thinking and live to your fullest potential.

Visual Attention and Consciousness

Understanding conscious awareness through the research on visual attention

How Does Physical Experience Affect Learning?

Real experiences help you learn more about the world.

New Research Tools to Test Brain Injury

Scientists can now see damage to living brains

Recent Posts on Cognition

The Neuroscience of Forming New Memories

In a breakthrough study, an international team of neuroscientists has identify how new memories are formed by individual neurons.

7 Ways to Mitigate Self-Doubt

Are you struggling with self-confidence? Learn how to overcome negative thinking and live to your fullest potential. Here are seven tips to mitigate self-doubt and create a new path to renewed confidence.

Visual Attention and Consciousness

To understand the relationship between visual attention and consciousness, we must first examine the various forms of attention that have been identified through empirical studies in cognitive psychology.

How Does Physical Experience Affect Learning?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on July 01, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
Go to a typical classroom, and it looks like a show. A teacher stands in front of the room. The teacher talks and demonstrates things from the front of the room. Unlike a show at a theater, the audience (the students) do get a chance to talk on occasion. But, most of the work students do is done from their seats.

The Two Directions of Creativity

By Drew Boyd on July 01, 2015 in Inside the Box
Most people think the way you create an idea is to start with a well-formed problem and then brainstorm a solution to it. What if you turned that around 180 degrees? It sounds counter-intuitive, but you really can innovate by starting with the solution and then work backwards to the problem.

New Research Tools to Test Brain Injury

By Eric Newhouse on July 01, 2015 in Invisible Wounds
Scientists at UCLA have been studying the brains of retired football players to determine what types of brain damage are caused by repeated concussions, and new technologies are allowing them to examine living brains. The next step will involve combat vets to see how they differ from NFL players and from Alzheimer's victims.

What Is Wrong With Dichotomous Thinking

It is said that there are two kinds of people, those who think there are two kinds of people and those who don't. Please discuss.

Can Evolution Explain All Human Behavior?

Evolutionary explanations of human behavior abound and they call on what we know about evolution. However, proving the validity of these explanations is another story. Why is that?

Ten Powerful Psychology Tools to Calm Your Anxious Mind

Are you stuck in overthinking? Anxious thoughts and worries can overwhelm you and make it even more difficult to make decisions and take action to deal with whatever problem is bothering you. Learn tools from Mindfulness and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy to take back control of your life.

Why Jobs That Make You Think Are Good Brain Medicine

By David DiSalvo on June 28, 2015 in Neuronarrative
Adding to an already robust catalog of research showing that thinking-related challenges are like exercise for the brain, the latest study shows that jobs involving high levels of “executive, verbal and fluid” tasks enhance memory and thinking abilities for years to come.

Body Language & Happiness

How do kids learn to be happy adults? Julius Fast, the author of Body Language (1970), was a childhood neighbor (my friend's dad) who taught us the answer to that mystery—in the way he lived. Quite literally, Body Language at it's best. Let him teach you as well.

Build Your Young Child’s Future School Success NOW

Prediction is often the key measurement in intelligence tests. Activities allowing your child to recognize, play with, and create patterns build his power of prediction.Successful prediction is one of the best problem-solving strategies the brain has and necessary for successful reading, calculating, test taking, goal setting, and appropriate social behavior.

10 Odd Emotions You May (or May Not) Have Experienced

Have you ever felt that you were out of place? Or,a sense of sadness that you will never know what will happen to your great-great-grandchildren? How many of these strange feelings have you have experienced?

The Avatar Theory of Consciousness

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on June 27, 2015 in Memory Medic
Evolution made us smart enough to be effective killers and hopefully wise enough to be more humane.

Seven Reasons We Are Captivated by the Number Seven

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on June 27, 2015 in The Squeaky Wheel
Why do we find the number 7 so alluring and fascinating? It turns out seven is our favorite number for a broad variety of reasons--seven of them.

Sparks of Genius Challenge #2: Non-Visual Observing

Observing is never a purely visual act. What we see is affected by what we have touched with our hands and felt within our bodies. The same goes, of course, for what we don’t see, but hear, smell or taste. By exercising non-visual forms of observing we heighten our attention overall.

The Consistency of Flashbulb Memories

By Art Markman Ph.D. on June 26, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
I remember as a kid that my parents shared vivid memories of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. They could tell me where they were and who they were with when they found out the president had been shot. In 1977, Roger Brown and James Kulik called memories like this flashbulb memories.

Top 10 'Memory' Diet Tips

A healthy diet optimizes brain health, memory function, and reduces risk of dementia.

Remembering As We Grow Old

By David Ludden Ph.D. on June 26, 2015 in Talking Apes
Memory doesn't have to decline in old age, but it does take more effort.

The Janusian Process in Creativity

The janusian process was discovered in extensive empirical investigations with outstanding literary prizewinners and with Nobel laureates in the sciences. It consists of conceiving and using multiple opposites or antitheses simultaneously. Application of the process in creative work is described through an outline of the appropriate do's and don'ts.

Remember: You Can Boost Memory

Processing, retaining and recalling information are the fundamental components of memory that we use every day. Whether it’s trying to recall where we left off in our favorite TV series or put the car keys, or struggling to remember an anniversary or online password, our minds are constantly churning vast amounts of information. Sound exhausting? Without enough key brain n

Thoughts Wandering in an Estonian Cemetery

Do Estonians, because of their surnames, feel more closely connected to nature? And what would happen if the dead wrote their own inscriptions on gravestones?

A 20-Second Experiment in Racial Stereotypes

A 20-second demonstration of where stereotypes come from. Knowledge is power.

Falling in Love With a Culture and a Language, Part 2

People who fall in love with a new culture and language are always fascinating. Here we follow Jimmy Davis, an American songwriter and composer, best known for his song "Lover Man", who first went to France during World War II as a soldier and who finally settled there for good.

Want to Make More Friends? Get a Dog

New data confirms that walking your dog makes it more likely that you will know your neighborhood and form friendships in your community.

"Inside Out": Emotional Truths by Way of Pixar

Pixar's "Inside Out" proves to be impressivley accurate to cognitive, developmental, and clinical psychology. Five of the six scientifically validated universal emotions demonstrate what it might be like in the mind of an 11-year-old girl who struggles with having to move away from her friends and to a different city. The film sends a message and has therapeutic value.

Relational Reasoning Shows How Kids Think Without Thinking

By Garth Sundem on June 23, 2015 in Brain Trust
Study shows how young children intuit relationships that older children over-think and can't see.

When the Student Is Ready the Teacher Will Appear

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on June 23, 2015 in Black Belt Brain
With some work and awareness, we can be ready to appreciate and learn many things we might otherwise overlook.

College and Mr. Gates

By Mack R. Hicks Ph.D. on June 23, 2015 in Digital Pandemic
Bill Gates should be applauded for his generous donations to education, but his blanket call for 11 million college grads won't accomplish much, and could hinder career education.