Essential Reads

Forgetting Apple’s Logo: Why We Forget What We Often See

Things we see constantly can be easily forgotten because we see them so often.

Our Top-Down Brains and How They Help Us Adapt to the World

What the gold-white, blue-black dress debate reveals about how our brains work

Why We Hate It When People Invade Our Space

John Travolta and Joe Biden put it in the news, but it's an everyday problem.

Why You Were Born to Gossip

According to one theory, everything we say takes the form of gossip.

Recent Posts on Cognition

Do Our Physical Actions Influence Our Opinions?

By Geoff Haddock Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in Attitude Check
Can holding a pen in your mouth lead you to see cartoons as more or less funny?

The Truth about Pain Relief

Opioids are pain medications including morphine, codeine, oxycodone, methadone, fentanyl or hydrocodone.

The Cerebellum Holds Many Clues for Creating Humanoid Robots

Recent discoveries show that the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") holds vital clues for the future creation of sentient robots and androids that are featured in upcoming blockbuster movies like Chappie, Ex Machina, and Avengers: Age of Ultron.

Feeling Paranoid?

Paranoid fears are common and have a variety of causes but new research shows specific issue cognitive behaviour therapy can bring significant benefits

Diets: What We Don't Know

Sometimes you need a guide to the guidelines.

Critical Thinking Puzzles

By Marcel Danesi Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in Brain Workout
Critical thinking puzzles are designed to stimulate the logical areas of the rain.

Adulthood's Dirty Secret

By Steven Mintz Ph.D. on March 05, 2015 in The Prime of Life
Social class' impact on education and family life.

The Mystery Dress

The latest obsession of social media: #Thedress. An image of a dress that some people see as white and gold, and others see as blue and black. What is the real explanation of this odd phenomenon?

Psychology Poems for the Month of March

Listen first, hear a blur… Get clues, listen twice, words are heard! Top-down: it filters.

Arrogance And Ignorance

By Michael F. Kay on March 04, 2015 in Financial Life Focus
Our beliefs can cripple us from seeing not only the big picture, but the real picture.

Q & A with R. Thaler on What It Really Means to Be a "Nudge"

By Peter A. Ubel on March 04, 2015 in Critical Decisions
Nudge is one of the most important and influential books on behavioral science and public policy I’ve ever read.

Adolescents Are Prone to Love Addiction

If someone falls in love and believes her love may be requited, parts of her brain take on the chemistry of a brain on cocaine.

Long-Term Look at Rett Syndrome

Australian researchers complete 20-year longitudinal study on neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome

Forgetting Apple’s Logo: Why We Forget What We Often See

Where was the last fire extinguisher you saw? Do you remember where the “B” key is on your keyboard? Even things we see and interact with constantly can be forgotten—sometimes because we see them so much.

Happiness With Life 6: Serve Yourself a Slice of Happiness

I don't care how physicists define time. Time, to me, is choice. This blog, Serve Yourself a Slice of Happiness, provides the mindsets and strategies to choose pleasure each and every day of our lives.

How to Say What You Truly Mean

Saying what you mean is more than a matter of finding the right words. It’s the intonation, or tone of voice, that adds punch to our language. If you’re a victim of “uptalk,” without knowing it, you may be leaving people with a wrong, and confusing, impression.

A Response to Sam Harris's Writings on Moral Truth Pt 2 of 3

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Cui Bono
In August of 2013, Sam Harris issued a challenge to refute the central thesis of his book, The Moral Landscape. This thesis is that "questions of morality and values must have right and wrong answers that fall within the purview of science." This is part 2 of a 3-part post explaining why I agree with everything in his book except the central thesis.

When Fractions are Better Than Decimals

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in Ulterior Motives
In order to graduate from high school, people usually spend about 13 years (K-12) learning about math concepts. One of the things that math does is to give us a universal way to think about quantities. The beauty of the number 2, for example, is that it refers to a pair of items regardless of whether those items are bowling balls, butterflies, or beer barrels.

Card Drives

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in In Excess
A number of years ago, I helped a leading Internet poker company do some research on different types of poker player and developed a typology. The typology was based on a survey of 2000 poker players and produced seven different types of player. But what were they? Find out more by reading this article.

50 Ways to Reduce Anxiety

By Alice Boyes Ph.D. on March 03, 2015 in In Practice
Mega list of strategies for dealing with anxiety.

Snow and the Choice of Joy

By Ran Zilca on March 02, 2015 in Confessions of a Techie
It’s all a matter of perspective, and the adult, practical perspective, sometimes even cynical, misses out on opportunities to experience such sheer joy.

The Brain Is Not an Octopus

By Susan Greenfield Ph.D. on March 02, 2015 in Mind Change
Engaging in several tasks at once might seem like a wonderful solution for keeping pace with the speed of twenty-first-century life, but the price paid could be high.

The Color Yellow

By Greg O'Brien on March 02, 2015 in On Pluto
Yellow is also a color of angels, and in scripture it symbolizes a change for the better. My mom, who died of Alzheimer’s in a bruising battle with the disease, believed in angels. So do I, in the wake of my own diagnosis five years ago of Early Onset Alzheimer’s. Yellow—derived from the ancient Latin “Angelus,” translated “messenger” or “envoys”— resonates with peace.

Parenthood and Resilience

By Michael W Austin on March 02, 2015 in Ethics for Everyone
Resilience is a crucial but often neglected trait that parents should try to build in their children.

5 Things Everyone Should Know About Resilience

By Peg Streep on March 02, 2015 in Tech Support
When we speak of someone being "resilient," we tend to think of it as a character strength. But what is resilience anyway, and what does it take to weather the setbacks in life? A look at the research reveals much...

Sex and Leadership for Women

Sex differences in the brain can help women be better leaders

Could You Be Addicted to Your Cell Phone?

Could you go 24 hours without your cell phone? Many people can't!

Fear and Pain Can Alter Memory

What we experience today can impact our memories of similar events that happened yesterday. Our present-moment experience is so powerful it may reinforce or ‘overwrite’ our memory of a past experience.

Why You Can't (and Shouldn't) Be Happy Most of the Time

By Frank T McAndrew Ph.D. on March 01, 2015 in Out of the Ooze
We work very hard to reach goals, anticipating the happiness that they will bring us. After a brief fix of “yippee," however, we quickly slide back to our sorry-ass, humdrum, ordinary state of being. Studies of lottery winners and others who seem to "have it all" throw cold water on our dream of a different life. And yet, we persist. Why?

A Dress of a Different Color

By Maureen Seaberg on March 01, 2015 in Sensorium
The dresses of the year, are, in fact, marsala!