Essential Reads

How to Challenge Your Self-Limiting Beliefs

Don't let your mind limit your potential. Train your brain to think differently.

5 Ways Our Body Language Speaks Loud and Clear

We constantly send out signals through our nonverbal communication, often without realizing it. A new study shows how these can impact our success at work.

Can Artificial Intelligence Make Us Happy?

Does AI spell the doom of humankind? Or should we welcome it? Given the significant limitations of human rationality, only AI can help humans to solve many difficult problems.

The Neuroscience of Finger Length Ratio and Athletic Prowess

By Christopher Bergland on October 14, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have found a correlation between finger length ratios and brain function. A new study reports that having a shorter index finger may indicate athletic potential.

More Posts on Cognition

Debate Scorecard for Hiring the President: How to Evaluate

How to bypass your biases and explore proven leadership competencies and derailers for the most important hiring evaluation. Score each candidate so you can ne be more objective.

Einstein, the Outcast

By Lybi Ma on October 20, 2016 in Brainstorm
Guest post by David Bodanis
Gerd Altmann/Pixabay

Over-Optimism, Overconfidence, and the JUDO Framework

Thinking positively can be good, but does over-optimism harm or hurt you business? Here are a few tips to temper your bias.

Political Persuasion: Aim for the Heart, Not the Head

So long as a message is emotionally congruent and consistent, both fear and hope can be equally pervasive.

Personality and the Brain, Part 4

When the bossy left hemisphere is “shushed” and the creative right brain is allowed to “speak,” artistic talent proliferates.

How to Tell if You Should Avoid Contact With Your Ex

If you and your ex cannot or do not intend to treat each other like true friends, then needless to say, it is best to end all contact ASAP.

Do “Brain Games” Sharpen Your Mind?

Over the past decade, scientists have zeroed in on “brain training” to improve cognitive skills. But does it work?

Personality and the Brain, Part 3

When the connection between the emotional brain and the front of the brain is damaged, people have trouble interpreting or feeling their emotions.

The Decline of Trust

By Robert L. Leahy Ph.D. on October 18, 2016 in Anxiety Files
In almost all areas of our lives trust has declined—and it has been on the decline for decades.

Personality and the Brain, Part 2

“Leigh used to be the class clown,” Amber said. “She would immediately shift a sinister atmosphere into a cheerful one. Now she barely smiles."

Personality and the Brain, Part 1

One evening on October 11, 2009, life took a dramatic turn for 41-year-old Leigh Erceg.

Seeing Beauty

By Bernard L. De Koven on October 17, 2016 in On Having Fun
Are things like beauty, love, fun, joy and faith aspects of an alternate reality?

A Drug to Improve Performance and Creativity

If study drugs give you a significant cognitive advantage, do you "cheat" if you take them? Do you become a different person?

Our Evolving Sense of Identity

Renew you spirit with these scientific discoveries.

What's Your Dog’s IQ?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on October 14, 2016 in Talking Apes
My dog’s smarter than your dog—and there’s a doggie IQ test to prove it!

Your Brain and That "Other National Deficit"

Recent research indicates that our brain's susceptibility to false memories of the past may actually come in handy in our encounters with unfamiliar situations in the future.

From “My Bad” to “I'm Sorry": Trump's Evolving Apology

Trump has apologized . . . sort of. He said the words, more than once, yet many voters are unconvinced. Why? We forgive (and often forget), when apologies are authentic.

Not Just Bilingual—Biliterate!

An increasing number of states are offering a Seal of Biliteracy to high school students who can read and write well in two languages. We think this is a good idea.

How to Keep a Dog From Jumping Up on People

You can keep a dog from jumping on people by considering the dog's behavior, and how people usually respond to the behavior.

Running May Help Repair Some Types of Brain Damage

By Christopher Bergland on October 12, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Aerobic exercise triggers the production of a molecule that can repair some types of brain damage and speeds up communication between brain regions, new study finds.

The Extraordinary Sensorium of Brian Wilson

By Maureen Seaberg on October 11, 2016 in Sensorium
How Beach Boy Brian Wilson, deaf in one ear, manages that remarkable sound...
<a href=''>wavebreakmediamicro / 123RF Stock Photo</a>

For the Public Good: How Much Difference Can You Make?

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on October 10, 2016 in Off the Couch
Have you given up on trying to make a difference in the world? Research says that you might want to revise your strategy.

Metaphors Help Explain Tough Topics Like Bias

By Nancy Darling Ph.D. on October 09, 2016 in Thinking About Kids
Metaphors can help us understand complex, emotionally charged topics like sexual consent and microaggressions.

Chi Whiz! Energy Exchanges Between People

Interpersonal energy exchanges seem to take place both in the same space and at a distance.

7 Steps to Making Sound Decisions

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on October 09, 2016 in The Squeaky Wheel
Sometimes we just can't make a decision—here is how to get unstuck.

Alzheimer's Study Links Triad of Brain Areas with Cognition

By Christopher Bergland on October 07, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Researchers at Harvard Medical School have discovered that various Alzheimer's disease symptoms are linked to a combination of atrophy factors in three different brain regions.

A Dog Is More Likely to Ignore Bad Advice Than a Child

Both dogs and children imitate the behaviors that they see, however dogs are less likely to imitate behaviors that are not relevant to completing a task.

Developmental Equity: Path to Student Success?

Educational equity is important, especially for youth impacted by race, cultural, and economic barriers. But is developmental equity more critical to success?

Should You Play Brain Games?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on October 04, 2016 in Ulterior Motives
Brain games are marketed as a way to improve general mental agility. A new analysis explores the (shaky) evidence for this claim.

Of Puppies, Play, and the Pursuit of Creative Insights

Awakening our creativity with a few simple words