Essential Reads

How to Put Yourself in Someone Else’s Shoes

Empathy works by analogy, mirror neurons, or embodied simulation.

8 Secret Body Language Cues That Can Control Your Behavior

How others can trigger your senses and emotions.

How Your Emotions Really Work

When the tail wags the dog.

Hearing With Our Eyes, Seeing With Our Ears

How the brain combines sights and sounds to create conscious experience

Recent Posts on Cognition

Building Cognitive Reserve

It's never too late to build cognitive reserve

How to Put Yourself in Someone Else’s Shoes

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on November 27, 2015 Hot Thought
You can empathize with people in three ways: recognizing their situations as analogous to your own, perceiving their pain or emotions using mirror neurons, or simulating their experiences using unconscious embodied rules.

8 Secret Body Language Cues That Can Control Your Behavior

Subtle body language in others can trigger emotional, cognitive, and behavioral reactions in us -- and we may be completely unaware of them.

Dog Training Using Behavior Capture

Behavior capture is a simple and enjoyable way to train dogs and puppies to respond to basic obedience commands.

The Meaning of Life

By Fredric Neuman M.D. on November 26, 2015 Fighting Fear
Description of the Discovery of the Meaning of Life! Including from the perspective of a frog

Critical Thinking 101: Why Lies Travel Faster than Truth

Mark Twain said it best: "A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes."

In Discussing "Youth," Jane Fonda Touches on "Superfluidity"

Jane Fonda recently described the awe-inspiring aspects of having a peak experience while discussing her upcoming movie 'Youth.'

Fearing the Wrong Things?

By David Myers Ph.D. on November 24, 2015 Talk Psych
Horrific terrorist acts abroad have sparked fears of international travel—and of Muslims and Syrian refugees—and warnings to "be aware" of risks. The psychological dynamics that drive exaggerated fears also were at work in 1942, as my family observed first hand.

Are You Being Lied to?

No matter the technique, most people can’t spot liars on a consistent basis. One potential solution to the problem is to remove “people” from the equation. Just let a computer do it.

Will Virtual Reality Usher In A New Romantic Era At Work?

By Tim Leberecht on November 23, 2015 The Romance of Work
The advent of VR in the workplace will represent a new stage for the experience economy. HR departments must start hiring experience designers, writers, and storytellers; IT department must add some serious VR expertise; and team leaders and executives must become curators of experiences.

How to Avoid Being Deceived by Opinion Polls

Master manipulators in politics, government, business, and media use opinion polls to influence our thinking, our choices, and our behavior. Learn to know when you’re being played for a rube.

How Does Exercise Protect Your Brain from Degeneration?

Two new studies have identified various ways that exercise protects the brain from degeneration as we age.

We Are Becoming Gods

By Mario D Garrett PhD on November 21, 2015 iAge
While we are behaving more like gods, we are learning that we are less human.

Examining the Effects of Mobile Phones on Kids and Teens

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on November 20, 2015 Sleep Newzzz
Navigating technology with children and teenagers isn’t easy, especially when it comes to nighttime and sleep.

7 Ways Meditation Supercharges Your Brain

By Susan Reynolds on November 20, 2015 Prime Your Gray Cells
Pausing daily, or at least regularly, to meditate can have amazing benefits for your brain, from increasing brain volume, to boosting focus and supercharging neurons. Here’s the lowdown on 7 long-term brain benefits.

How Your Emotions Really Work

It can be the opposite of what you think.

Hearing With Our Eyes, Seeing With Our Ears

By David Ludden Ph.D. on November 19, 2015 Talking Apes
Consciousness is a virtual reality in the head, the brain’s best guess as to what’s out there in the world.

9 Mantras That Keep You Mentally Strong During Tough Times

The things you tell yourself during tough times play a major role in your ability to overcome hardship.

In the Age Of Emoji, What's in a Word?

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on November 18, 2015 Language in the Mind
The Oxford Dictionaries 2015 word of the year isn't a word. In fact, it's an emoji. What does this mean for the changing status of language in the digital age?

The Clothes You Wear Can Affect a Dog's Emotional State

Data shows that if your clothing has stripes vs polka-dots or plain color, it can provoke an emotional response in dogs

6 Little Known Factors That Can Affect Depression

By Pamela D. Garcy Ph.D. on November 18, 2015 Fearless You
These 6 little known factors can affect depression.

Do Bilingual Infants Have Better Memory?

As researchers continue to debate cognitive advantages of bilingualism, they develop increasingly more sophisticated methods to examine our earliest experiences. A recent study of infant memory suggests that bilingual babies display better memory and ability to generalize across different contexts than monolingual ones. But what about trilingual babies?

What Are You So Afraid Of?

By Sophia Dembling on November 17, 2015 The Introvert's Corner
Professional coach Beth Buelow says we can't ignore fear, but we can get to know it better to push past it.

Romance Is Bad for Our Mental Health

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on November 17, 2015 Ambigamy
The tendency to treat life's rough, uncertain ride as romantic fiction runs and ruins our personal and social lives. Romance ignores chance in favor of fate, probabilities in favor of certainties, details in favor of destinies. It glorifies us and vilifies anyone who gets in our way. It turns love into a sugar high and crash and makes a mess of politics.

Can't We Just Talk?

Can’t we just talk? Is social media replacing our ability to connect and empathize?

Motivation Is Tied to the Strength of Your Brain Connections

Would you identify yourself as someone who is highly motivated or more apathetic? Neuroscientists at Oxford University recently discovered a neurobiological mechanism that might explain why some of us are inherently more ambitious than others. The findings also explain the neuroscience of why "Just Do It" is such a motivational slogan.

Consciousness and Memory

The role of memory in consciousness is often taken for granted. Without the brain's various memory systems it would be unlikely that conscious experience would even occur. Consciousness not only relies on working memory to maintain perceptual and other information but also on long-term memory to enrich our present experience with information from the past.

There’s No Reason to Celebrate Trauma

By Marty Babits on November 16, 2015 The Middle Ground
There have been breakthroughs in how we understand and treat trauma.

Terror on the Tube: Background Television & Little Ones

By Jamie Krenn Ph.D. on November 16, 2015 Screen Time
Recently, Paris came under attack to a horrific set of events. While most young children are not sitting down to watch the evening news, a fair set of households do keep television news on in the background. Encourage children to talk about what they have viewed either in the foreground or the background can help.

The Assault on the American Mind

By Ravi Chandra M.D. on November 15, 2015 The Pacific Heart
A response to recent Atlantic articles about campus unrest and the supposed "coddling" of the American mind. We can't tell students they're "too sensitive" and that they should "lighten up and get over it." The moment calls for more than just free speech or intellectualizing. We need empathic inclusion.