Essential Reads

The Surprising Things You’ve Never Wanted to Know about Love

We think of love as an entirely positive emotion, but there are some surprising downsides to being in love.

Time Alone Saps the Willpower of People Who Are Neurotic

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in Living Single
For some people, time alone is rejuvenating. New research shows that for neurotic people, just thinking about spending time by themselves can instead undermine their motivation.

Future Thinking and False Memories

Have you ever had a vivid memory that turned out to be false? New research suggests that false memories may actually be associated with a number of positive psychological traits.

We’re All a Bit Racist

It may be unintentional, but we’re all a little bit racist.

More Posts on Cognition

The New Science of Empathic Accuracy Could Transform Society

Contrary to popular belief, new research shows that the ability to interpret other people's emotions accurately requires more cerebral thinking and less intuition.

What's Wrong in America?

If you are frustrated or angry with what you see wrong in America, you could be part of the solution by simply changing your frame of mind. Learn how.

Why Do Run-Down Schools Trigger Lower Test Scores?

A new study from Cornell University identifies a chain reaction that occurs in run-down schools which results in lower test scores for students from all walks of life.

Melania’s Alleged Plagiarism: Concordance Model Does Not Fit

Concordance may be a viable theory for some coincidences, but does not apply to the Melania-Michelle parallel.

Just Being Near You Is Rewarding for Dogs

A new study suggests that dogs find merely being near humans to be rewarding even without any social interactions.

8 Hard, Big Questions and My Insufficient Answers

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 21, 2016 in How To Do Life
Thinking about these questions can lift us above our quotidian concerns.

5 Good and Bad Ways Nature Impacts Your Emotional Health

By Guy Winch Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in The Squeaky Wheel
By 2050, 70% of people will live in urban areas. Now consider how powerfully nature affects our minds, brains, and body as illustrated by these recent studies:

Thinking Visually With DeAngela Napier

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in Brick by Brick
DeAngela Napier is a visual thinker. Napier, who works as a photographer, video producer and editor, thinks of her work as visual storytelling...

A 60 Second Journey Deep Into Your Unconscious

Venture into the unknown...if you dare!

Plagiarism and Google

By William Poundstone on July 19, 2016 in Head in the Cloud
Is there an epidemic of celebrity cribbing—or does it just seem that way?

Melania's Words Parallel Michelle's: A Coincidence?

Coincidences can have a range of explanations. Concordance is one of them.

Why Smart People Make Dumb Mistakes With Their Money: Part 2

Are your beliefs about the stock market costing you money?

Oh No, Pokémon Go!

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on July 17, 2016 in Mental Mishaps
We have an infestation of Pokémon on my campus and in my community. Have you seen any Pokémon lurking around your home, at work, in parks, or on the streets near you?
L. Pettler

Staging Murder

Investigative consultant describes how homicides get staged as other types of death incidents, and urges law enforcement to pay attention.

Bird Brains: Size Doesn't Matter But Number of Neurons Does

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on July 16, 2016 in Animal Emotions
New research shows that "large numbers of neurons concentrated in high densities in the telencephalon substantially contribute to the neural basis of avian intelligence."

Where Operant Conditioning Went Wrong

By John Staddon, Ph.D. on July 15, 2016 in Adaptive Behavior
Operant conditioning is no longer at the center of experimental psychology: why not?

Coincidences and the Non-Moving Violation

Want to create more coincidences? Avoid the non-moving violation.

Which Emotions Do We See in Dogs and Cats?

New data looks at the basic and complex emotions that pet owners observe in their own dogs and cats.

Clear Thinking About Decluttering: 8 Insights

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on July 13, 2016 in Creating in Flow
Like diet books, books about how to clean out our clutter are always popular. What's the fascination, and why can't we "just do it" once and for all?
pixabay.org

Creating Fictional Worlds That Feel Real

By Laura Otis Ph.D. on July 13, 2016 in Rethinking Thought
When you read a novel, do you know what color hair each characters has?

The Anti-Psychologists

By Stanton Peele on July 13, 2016 in Addiction in Society
Psychology has been engaged in a decades-long battle for its soul—is it really a field independent of brain psychology? I sometimes view myself one of psychology's last advocates.

Why Does the Brain Age? Can We Do Anything About It?

Why is brain aging so individually variable? Can we do anything to delay cognitive decline?
graphic stock with permission

Decision-Making Made Ridiculously Simple!

By Neil Farber M.D, Ph.D. on July 11, 2016 in The Blame Game
Decision making can be stressful, It's one of the most important things that we do and we do it about 35,000 times every day. These 8 factors are the key to making wise choices.

The Greatest Conspiracy Theory of All Time

By Guy P. Harrison on July 10, 2016 in About Thinking
What do you say to people who claim nobody ever walked on the Moon?

Thinking While Black

By Billi Gordon Ph.D. on July 09, 2016 in Obesely Speaking
Racism and the brain-gut connection – a neuroscience perspective on racially motivated police violence towards Black Americans.

The Panama Papers Reveal the Solution to Global Suffering

How can we address global poverty quickly and effectively? Tax havens as revealed by the Panama Papers hold the key!

Pets Are Not Trash

We often hear that pets are being treated better than ever. Why, then, do so many animals end up being treated like garbage?

Police Shootings, Racism, Brexit, Trump. What Is Going On?

What is going on in the world? Why do we allow fear, hate, racism and xenophobia to become a rampant mobilizing force in society?

The Case for Copying

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 08, 2016 in How To Do Life
Why rote learning such as memorizing and copying is underrated.

Study: Some PTSD May Result From Blast Concussion

By Eric Newhouse on July 07, 2016 in Invisible Wounds
Researchers find a distinct pattern of scarring in the brains of soldiers who experienced concussive blasts and believe they may have caused post traumatic stress disorder.