Cognition Essential Reads

Bird Brain: An Exploration of Avian Intelligence

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on August 29, 2016 in Animal Emotions
Dr. Nathan Emery's new book "Bird Brain: An Exploration of Avian Intelligence" is a gold mine of information and surprises about the latest research on bird smarts.

Are Conservatives More Anti-Science Than Liberals?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on August 26, 2016 in Talking Apes
Skepticism about scientific findings depends on your core beliefs, not your level of science literacy.

The Problem With Positive Thinking

By Joel Minden, PhD on August 25, 2016 in CBT and Me
Does positive thinking lead to greater happiness? If only it were that simple. When negative thinking gets you down, here’s what to do instead.
By Internet Archive Book Images [No restrictions], via Wikimedia Commons

10 Cognitive Biases Ruining Your Diet

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on August 25, 2016 in Science of Choice
Cognitive biases lead to craving and overeating thereby contributing to weight gain and obesity

To Bribe or Not to Bribe

Reading incentive programs, where students get points or prizes, and sometimes even grades, for reading “fun” books, are a ubiquitous feature of many literacy programs.

Why a Drained Brain Makes Bad Decisions

By David DiSalvo on August 22, 2016 in Neuronarrative
The brain is an energy hog that uses 15-20% of the body’s circulating blood glucose each day, and that energy isn't insignificant when it comes to making sound decisions.

Can You Learn a Second Language After Childhood?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on August 19, 2016 in Talking Apes
While it’s true that that it’s easier to learn a language when you’re young, adults can still learn languages with the right motivation.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamescridland/4984060658

Who Blames the Victim?

By Laura Niemi, Ph.D. on August 18, 2016 in Morality in Language
Moral values constitute a core framework that organizes psychological processes to motivate predictable patterns of condemnation toward victims. Still, language matters!

Should You Share Your Cocktail Hour With Your Dog?

Evidence shows that sharing alcoholic beverages with your dog is a bad practice.

The Practical Benefits of a Wandering Mind

The next time you’re trying to concentrate and find your mind wandering off task, you might just want to let it go. New research suggests it may be helping you achieve your goals.

Learning the New Language of Racism

Language influences how we feel and how we react to things. Language is the foundation of change. Rather than avoid and deny, we need to start learning.

Talent Matters for Excellence

By Art Markman Ph.D. on August 15, 2016 in Ulterior Motives
When looking at the performance of a world-class performer like Usain Bolt, it is easy to ask about the role of talent in highly skilled performance.

Who Are Psychology's Geniuses? Part 2

I offer a few more nominations for psychologists whose contributions deserve to be called ingenious, and some analysis of what makes them stand out. See if you agree.

Serendipity: A Store, a Movie and a Coincidence

A movie has replaced the original definition of serendipity.

3 Ways Aerobic Exercise Improves Schizophrenia Symptoms

By Christopher Bergland on August 12, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A groundbreaking report, published this morning, identifies three specific ways that aerobic exercise improves cognitive functioning in people with schizophrenia.

Dog People Are Popular While Cat People Are Single

Data based on 160,000 Facebook users shows interesting differences in lifestyle, personality and personal preferences between dog people and cat people.

Consciousness and Language

The relation between consciousness and language is not always clear, but a better understanding of how cognitive abilities evolved helps clarify this relationship.

The One False Belief Holding You Back

Metacognition is a key skill necessary for self-improvement.

The Cognitive Cost of Paying Attention

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on August 07, 2016 in Black Belt Brain
Stopped at a light and thinking about reaching over to check the texts on your phone? It will affect your ability to concentrate on driving. So, maybe don't do that.

A Gripping Tale: Abstraction as Our Friend (and Foe!)

In striving to be as creative as possible, we can find ourselves in an ongoing tug-of-war with abstraction.
W. R. Klemm

Who Is Responsible? You or Your Neurons

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on August 02, 2016 in Memory Medic
Do you deserve credit for your honest achievements and blame for your failures? An increasing number of philosophers and scientists says no.
courtesy: Twitter

The Psychology of Our Post-Factual Presidential Election

By David Ropeik on August 01, 2016 in How Risky Is It, Really?
A foolish mistake by a campaign worker that got little attention reveals a lot about how seemingly irrational we can be when it comes to politics.

Stop the Presses! Dog Owners Are Happier

A new study reveals the impact dog and cat ownership has on the mental well-being, happiness, and life satisfaction of people.

3 Easy Things You Can Do to Be More Successful

By Ryan Anderson on July 24, 2016 in The Mating Game
Are you wondering how to be successful? Greatness is within everyone. A few simple adjustments to your life can go a long way.

3 Surprising Facts About the Dangerous Power of Love

We think of love as an entirely positive emotion, but there are some surprising downsides to being in love.

Time Alone Saps the Willpower of People Who Are Neurotic

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on July 20, 2016 in Living Single
For some people, time alone is rejuvenating. New research shows that for neurotic people, just thinking about spending time by themselves can instead undermine their motivation.

Future Thinking and False Memories

Have you ever had a vivid memory that turned out to be false? New research suggests that false memories may actually be associated with a number of positive psychological traits.

We’re All a Bit Racist

It may be unintentional, but we’re all a little bit racist.

Why Smart People Make Dumb Mistakes With Their Money: Part 1

Are your beliefs about the stock market costing you money?

Do Misspelled Menus Matter?

By William Poundstone on July 12, 2016 in Head in the Cloud
Has texting made proper spelling obsolete? A survey shows that spelling and grammar really don't matter on menus.