Cognition Essential Reads

Is Alex Jones a Conspiracy Theorist or a Performance Artist?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on April 23, 2017 in Psych Unseen
If Jones isn't delusional, what about his followers?

Intelligence, Education, Personality, and Social Mobility

By Michael Hogan Ph.D. on April 21, 2017 in In One Lifespan
What predicts upward social mobility? We identified four important factors—education, intelligence, higher openness and lower neuroticism.

The Science of Religion for Everyone

Why insist that religion is immune from scientific study when cognitive and evolutionary theories have already made great strides in explaining a wide array of religious phenomena?

A Fool and His or Her Money, Psychologically Speaking

Three cognitive biases that can lead to unwise financial decisions.

Coincidence in Politics: All the President’s Men

A series of similar, low-probability events involving the Trump presidential campaign demonstrate how coincidences can be analyzed objectively.

A Wide Range of Mental Disorders May Have Link to Cerebellum

A first-of-its-kind study from Duke University has identified a previously unknown link between the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") and multiple mental health disorders.

Wealth, Poverty, and the Brain: A Q&A With Kimberly Noble

Are poorer children deprived of opportunities for healthy cognitive development? How can we improve these conditions? Kimberly Noble, MD, Ph.D., offers some insight.
Image by Peter Zamiska

United Airlines and the Short Fuse of Social Media

By John Nosta on April 11, 2017 in The Digital Self
The temptation to throw companies and people off the cliff is a real problem.

Are Humans Adapted to Modern Environments?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on April 11, 2017 in The Human Beast
Our two main theories of human behavior do a poor job of explaining how humans change to meet the demands of varied environments – but we do.

The Most Powerful Way to Learn is Not What You Think

Before attempting to learn something new to keep yourself marketable in a changing environment, try these three approaches to "unlearning."

Speeding Up Your Creativity by Slowing Down

New research on making creative headway through attentive looking

Why Brains Won’t Be Beaten by Supercomputers, or Terminators

Are we engineering our way to extinction? Should we fear machines taking over, or can we solve our way out of this puzzle?

You and Your Partner Likely Remember Dates in Similar Ways

When you go to a movie with your partner, you might take away similar memories of the experience.

Solitude Is the School of Genius

Great scientists in the past have not only tended to be autistic, but also to be socially isolated.
William Murphy/Flickr

Aging, Resilience, and The New Normal

What's the key to resilience as you grow older? Adjusting to your New Normal.

People Know Their Errors in Duration Estimates

By Art Markman Ph.D. on April 03, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
There are many situations in which we must learn to respond at a particular time. What information does the brain have to make this happen?

New Research Shows an Easy Way to Help Improve Your Memory

There’s memory for the past and memory for the future, or what you need to do. This new perspective based on cognitive style can help you improve both without much effort at all.

How Paradoxes Populate Our Lives

By Eric Dietrich Ph.D. on March 31, 2017 in Excellent Beauty
Have you ever experienced something that was too sad for words? Then you have also experienced a paradox. And paradoxes make our lives beautiful.

Do Twins Read Each Other's Minds?

By Nancy L. Segal Ph.D. on March 30, 2017 in Twofold
Some people think twin communicate telepathically, but research shows otherwise.

Staying Safe in a Fast-Changing World

By Steve Casner Ph.D. on March 30, 2017 in Careful
Everyday accidents are on the rise and here's how to avoid them.

What Do Your Words Broadcast About Trust?

You can see trust at work. You can hear it, too. The words we choose broadcast trust or distrust to those around us. What are your words saying?

Cerebellum Stimulation Influences Frontal Cortex Functioning

Stimulating the cerebellum normalizes frontal cortex activity in lab rats with abnormal dopamine processing, a new study reports. These findings could have many human applications.

What's in a Name?

By Drew Boyd on March 28, 2017 in Inside the Box
A person’s facial appearance can be significantly influenced by their given name, according to new research, perhaps due to the existence of shared face-name prototypes.

The Forgotten Rural Gifted Child

What can we do to help talented students from rural backgrounds?

Real-World Neuroscience Research Promotes Human Interactions

Pioneering neuroscientists are taking their research out of the lab and into the real-world. Recent "Out of the Lab" studies illuminate the importance of face-to-face eye contact.

Taking a Step Back Could Save Your Relationship

Looking at disagreements from the view of an outside observer provides new insights that just might change the course of your relationship.

Want to Build a Dog From A Fox? Here's How To Do It.

Tucked away in Siberia, there are furry, four-legged creatures with wagging tails that are as friendly as any lapdog. But, despite appearances, these are not dogs—they are foxes.

Prestige, Power, and Placebos

Intuitive errors and social pressures often fool us into the wrong decisions. But our social minds also possess untapped healing power. Recent research shows us how to use it!

Science Is Not Political

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on March 22, 2017 in Mental Mishaps
Nonetheless, science is embroiled in politics. Why is science so controversial, and why are the scientists planning a big march?

The Self Illusion and Psychotherapy

The self is an illusion and, as I noted in a recent paper published in Australasian Psychiatry, we can tailor psychotherapy to highjack the mechanisms that create it.