Cognition Essential Reads

How to Challenge Your Self-Limiting Beliefs

Don't let your mind limit your potential. Train your brain to think differently.

5 Ways Our Body Language Speaks Loud and Clear

We constantly send out signals through our nonverbal communication, often without realizing it. A new study shows how these can impact our success at work.

Can Artificial Intelligence Make Us Happy?

Does AI spell the doom of humankind? Or should we welcome it? Given the significant limitations of human rationality, only AI can help humans to solve many difficult problems.

The Neuroscience of Finger Length Ratio and Athletic Prowess

By Christopher Bergland on October 14, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have found a correlation between finger length ratios and brain function. A new study reports that having a shorter index finger may indicate athletic potential.

Can We Trust the Decision Researchers?

By Gary Klein Ph.D. on October 10, 2016 in Seeing What Others Don't
The Heuristics and Biases (HB) movement has had a tremendous influence and has generated the field of Behavioral Economics. However, the HB community has its own set of biases.

Strategic Studying: The Value of Forced Recall

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on October 09, 2016 in Memory Medic
School has started, and many students are discovering that they are not doing as well as expected. Parents and teachers may be chiding them about working harder. That may not help.

Emotion Perception Across Cultures

By Marianna Pogosyan Ph.D. on October 09, 2016 in Between Cultures
Culture influences how we perceive facial expressions in subtle yet important ways.

A Fundamental Source of Error in Human Judgment

By Gary Smith Ph.D. on October 07, 2016 in What the Luck?
We encounter it almost every day, yet almost nobody understands it.

Why Are Scientists So Close-Minded?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on October 07, 2016 in Talking Apes
The more you learn about the brain, the more you question the religious teachings of your childhood.

Caffeine Helps Prevent Memory Loss, Research Shows

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on October 06, 2016 in Cravings
If you're worried about memory loss, new research says caffeine may be your drug of choice.

How Brain Imaging Can Be Used to Fight Mental Health Stigma

Roughly 42 million people suffer from mental illness, yet social stigmas keep many from seeking treatment. Stigmas about mental health need to change, and technology can help.

Peace Through Ignorance?

By William Poundstone on October 05, 2016 in Head in the Cloud
Americans don't know much geography, and maybe that's a good thing, suggests Presidential candidate Gary Johnson.

Consciousness and Empathy

While much of human intelligence does not require one to be consciously aware of it, empathy may be something that necessitates phenomenal consciousness.

Psychology's Crisis Isn't New

By Jonathan Wai Ph.D. on September 30, 2016 in Finding the Next Einstein
What is new is the public attention and change that’s generating. In addition to the replication crisis, here are some other problems with the field that need addressing.

Can Dogs Teach Other Dogs to Speak?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on September 28, 2016 in Canine Corner
A dog can learn how to make and use specific sounds for communication simply by observing other dogs

10 Things to Know About Déjà Vu

Acceptance of déjà vu has widened in recent decades, and research psychologists are just beginning to understand this phenomenon.

If You Want to Become More Mindful, Check Your Watch

By Karl Albrecht Ph.D. on September 24, 2016 in BrainSnacks
if the “monkey mind,” as the Eastern practitioners call it, has a mind of its own, how does one become more “mindful?” How can your mind stay focused, when it loves to wander?

5 Ways Money Issues Can Ruin Relationships

By Andrea Bonior Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in Friendship 2.0
Issues surrounding money are one of the most common conflicts within relationships, even where there is plenty of love. Here are five ways that money damages partnerships.

What Eye Contact Can Do to You

Eye contact has the power to alter our behavior, attention, memory, and appraisal of who's looking at us. Is that always a good thing?

Is It Too Late to Say Balti?

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on September 20, 2016 in Language in the Mind
What is the nature of punning? Musical puns in TV adverts provide an unexpected venue to explore the linguistics of humor.

$50m Judgment Says Brain Training a Sham

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on September 19, 2016 in The Fallible Mind
Letting someone else sharpen your brain sounds great. Except it doesn't work, and you have to do the work yourself. The good news is that it isn't so hard.

The Power of Contamination and Taint in Language

By Laura Niemi, Ph.D. on September 18, 2016 in Morality in Language
Do we need to distinguish between harm and purity to understand moral psychology? Contamination concepts in political rhetoric and coping suggest that we do.

Remembering Under Pressure

People often justify procrastination by claiming that they "work better under pressure." New research indicates that, in some kinds of tasks, there may be some truth to that claim.

The Psychology Behind Donald Trump's Unwavering Support

By Bobby Azarian Ph.D. on September 13, 2016 in Mind In The Machine
The political ascent of Donald Trump seems to defy all logic, but psychology and neuroscience research explains how quirks of the brain underlie the mind-boggling phenomenon.

Therapy Without a Therapist?

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on September 13, 2016 in Think, Act, Be
Learning and practicing new skills is at the heart of CBT—whether you're working with a therapist or on your own.

How to Remember Everything

By Ryan Anderson on September 13, 2016 in The Mating Game
Learning the basics of the Method of Loci technique is possibly one of the most effective ways to spend the next 15 minutes of your life

Why Is the Backward Research Method So Effective?

It forces up-front thinking about use of research results and required data, and removes guess-work on the researcher's part.

How Others See You

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 10, 2016 in Talking Apes
Our intuition is a powerful information processor that helps us make quick judgments of others, but it also has built-in biases that lead us astray.

This Is Why Some People Are Always Late

If you’re always late, the culprit may be your internal clock. These tips, based on new time-estimation research, will help you be on time.
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How Drum Circles Can Improve, if Not Cure, Your Depression

Have you ever wondered how people used to treat depression before prescription medications were invented?