Cognition Essential Reads

Taking A Step Back Could Save Your Relationship

By Amie M. Gordon PhD on March 25, 2017 in Between You and Me
Looking at disagreements from the view of an outside observer provides new insights that just might change the course of your relationship.

Want to Build a Dog From A Fox? Here's How To Do It.

Tucked away in Siberia, there are furry, four-legged creatures with wagging tails that are as friendly as any lapdog. But, despite appearances, these are not dogs—they are foxes.

Prestige, Power, and Placebos

Intuitive errors and social pressures often fool us into the wrong decisions. But our social minds also possess untapped healing power. Recent research shows us how to use it!

Science Is Not Political

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on March 22, 2017 in Mental Mishaps
Nonetheless, science is embroiled in politics. Why is science so controversial, and why are the scientists planning a big march?

The Self Illusion and Psychotherapy

The self is an illusion and, as I noted in a recent paper published in Australasian Psychiatry, we can tailor psychotherapy to highjack the mechanisms that create it.

Mindful in the Classroom: New Lessons in Mental Literacy

A new age of neuroscientific literacy is beginning in the classroom.

Stress Mindset Tied to Physical and Mental Health

Is stress getting in your way? Modifying your mindset may improve your health.

Can Intelligence or Personality Compensate for Disadvantage?

Can intelligence or personality compensate for background disadvantage in predicting later life outcomes?

In Defense of Empathy

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on March 10, 2017 in Hot Thought
A new book argues that empathy is not only overrated but actually harmful to morality. But it is often helpful in guiding ethical judgment and motivating appropriate actions.

Tweaking the Past to Prepare for the Future

A recent study suggests that imagining what might have been in the past can help you prepare for what might be in the future.
Charles Darwin/Public Domain

Why Does Autism Still Exist?

By Barb Cohen on March 07, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
Some gene variants associated with autism are also significantly associated with high intelligence. “Smart” genes are advantageous from an evolutionary standpoint, so they persist.

Does Your Body Language Give You Away?

It’s widely known that your body language provides a window into your thoughts. Control that language, with guidance from this new research, to improve your relationships.

Brain Dynamic Patterns and the Mind

The mystery of consciousness is approached from several materialistic or dualistic perspectives. Brain activity patterns play a critical role; could the patterns be fractals?

8 Ways CBT Can Improve Your Relationship

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on March 06, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
Cognitive behavioral therapy can help your relationship in many ways—even when the treatment isn't specifically about your relationship. Find out how to start using CBT today.

What Does Information Look Like in the Brain?

Does thinking harder or experiencing deep emotions like love, fear, or anguish light up more neurons? Probably not.

Tired of Putting Things Off, and of Being Seen as a Bore?

By Peter Toohey Ph.D. on February 26, 2017 in Annals of the Emotions
“Another day gone. What are you going to do about it?” Is this what you want to know from your latest watch?

What If We Were All Politically Conservative?

By David B. Feldman Ph.D. on February 24, 2017 in Supersurvivors
Some psychologists believe that even liberal people, deep down, possess inherently conservative instincts.

The Connection Between Economics and Promiscuity

By Jesse Marczyk Ph.D. on February 24, 2017 in Pop Psych
Does female economic dependence on men lead to greater condemnation of promiscuity?

Don’t Let Your Thinking Sabotage Your Goals

By David Ludden Ph.D. on February 24, 2017 in Talking Apes
How you see yourself in the future can either help or hinder your ability to delay gratification.
Svitlana-ua/Shutterstock

To Sleep, Perhaps to Learn

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Memory Medic
Odds are the kids in your life are not getting enough sleep. Scientists now know that sleep is needed for "smart forgetting."

The Neuroscience of Fearful Memories and Avoidance Behaviors

By Christopher Bergland on February 20, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Neuroscientists have identified how the brain remembers fearful experiences. And how fear-based memories can lead to avoidance behaviors.

Could Thinking Positively Be Dangerous Right Now?

Have you started opening the newspapers each day with a sense of dread and disbelief about that latest actions of President Trump and his administration?

Are Refugees a Threat to Americans?

Are refugees a threat to the safety of Americans? Research suggests we needn't be afraid.

Flat Earthers: Belief, Skepticism, and Denialism

By Joe Pierre M.D. on February 19, 2017 in Psych Unseen
Kyrie Irving thinks the world is flat. Or does he?

Declinism: Why You Think America is in Crisis

Is America really on the brink of disaster? Studies show most people feel things are bad and getting worse. Declinism, based on cognitive bias, explains why.

Do Nervous Dog Owners Have Nervous Dogs?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on February 16, 2017 in Canine Corner
Dog owners who have more neurotic personalities tend to have dogs who are nervous and cope with stress less efficiently, a new study finds.

So You Think You Can Dance?

By Lydia Denworth on February 14, 2017 in Brain Waves
What makes a woman a good dancer? The hips don't lie.

People Mistrust Science in General, But Not Specific Studies

By Art Markman Ph.D. on February 13, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
This has been a difficult era for science in the public eye. How does the uncertainty of science affect people's trust in it?
wikipedia/wikipedia

What Does It Take to Be Truly Happy?

By Joshua Knobe on February 13, 2017 in Experiments in Philosophy
Ever wonder what it means to be truly happy? New research suggests there may be more to it than just feeling good.

Motor Skills, Movement, and Math Performance Are Intertwined

By Christopher Bergland on February 10, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
There is growing evidence that children who are physically active do better in school. A new study found that kids who move their bodies while learning math get higher test scores.