Cognition Essential Reads

Do You Learn More When You Make Your Notes Beautiful?

Taking beautiful notes might help students learn.
T. Mairunteregger

Seligman on Tour

Is "prospection" the newest and holiest of grails in psychology? Seligman: "Yes." We: "No."

Does the Popularity of Emoji Mean We Are Getting Dumber?

The rise and rise of Emoji makes us more effective communicators in the digital age.

Loaded: Coincidences in the Family

The intense emotions of family relationships and their necessary transitions create elaborate and complicated coincidences. How can we make sense of them?
Eduard Kurzbauer / The Dispute / Walters Art Museum / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

A Question That Good Critical Thinkers Ask, Part 1

If I were to tell you that reading this article will make you a better critical thinker, what question would a good critical thinker ask about my claim?

Are Musical Preferences All in the Sound?

Are musical preferences all in the sound?
pixabay.com

Required Summer Reading

In a landmark study of why human beings believe what they believe and do what they do, Robert Sapolsky demonstrates that brains and cultures evolve; genes don't determine anything.

Exactly How to Have More Fun on Vacation

By Andrea Bartz on May 16, 2017 in The Wandering Mind
For maximum enjoyment, just add THIS.

3 Ways Overthinking Hurts More Than It Helps

Whether you beat yourself up for a mistake you made last week, or you fret about how you're going to succeed tomorrow, overthinking everything can be debilitating.

Stress and Memory Impairment in Older Adults

Stress reduction is important for optimal cognitive aging.

Why Do People Still Think Pluto Is a Planet?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on May 15, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
When I was growing up, the list of planets in our solar system included a small planet far from the Sun called Pluto. Then, things changed.

5 Reasons to Streamline Your Life

These 5 research-based reasons for living a streamlined life will convince you that it’s time to take a new look at your home, and your calendar.

People Wrongly Gauge How Much They're Observed By Others

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on May 10, 2017 in Media Spotlight
How invisible do you really feel when you are people watching? New research explores the invisibility cloak illusion and what it can mean in social situations
Sararwut Jaimassiri/Shutterstock

A Genetic Revolution: No Two Neurons Alike

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on May 10, 2017 in Memory Medic
You are what you have been made by your genes and environment. But what you choose to think and do can change who you are.

Familiar Stories Are Often Liked Better than New Ones

By Art Markman Ph.D. on May 08, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Blockbuster season at the movies is upon us again. And when we look at the slate of movies coming out, there is the usual collection of sequels.

The Secret to Remembering Your Vacation Better

By Andrea Bartz on May 08, 2017 in The Wandering Mind
New research shows us how to make that trip stick.
By William Ely Hill United States Library of Congressis

How Do You See It?

How is it that perfectly reasonable, informed people come to hold opposing views? Ambiguous figures teach unambiguous lessons about perspective taking.

Jaak Panksepp: Archaeologist of the Mind

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on May 03, 2017 in Play in Mind
Panksepp believed that PLAY was the most complex of the positive emotions.

Categorizing Coincidences

Coincidences come in many forms, have many uses and several different explanations. Let's find the patterns that link these characteristics.

Brains Have Owners

By William R. Klemm Ph.D. on April 26, 2017 in Memory Medic
Is there an avatar in your brain called "I"? Neuroscience suggests this is the case.

Cognitive Benefits of Exercise Outshine Brain-Training Games

There is growing evidence that physical activity is more effective than sedentary "brain-training" games for maintaining robust cognitive function and "working memory" as we age.

Is Alex Jones a Conspiracy Theorist or a Performance Artist?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on April 23, 2017 in Psych Unseen
If Jones isn't delusional, what about his followers?

Intelligence, Education, Personality, and Social Mobility

By Michael Hogan Ph.D. on April 21, 2017 in In One Lifespan
What predicts upward social mobility? We identified four important factors—education, intelligence, higher openness and lower neuroticism.

The Science of Religion for Everyone

Why insist that religion is immune from scientific study when cognitive and evolutionary theories have already made great strides in explaining a wide array of religious phenomena?

A Fool and His or Her Money, Psychologically Speaking

Three cognitive biases that can lead to unwise financial decisions.

Coincidence in Politics: All the President’s Men

A series of similar, low-probability events involving the Trump presidential campaign demonstrate how coincidences can be analyzed objectively.

A Wide Range of Mental Disorders May Have Link to Cerebellum

A first-of-its-kind study from Duke University has identified a previously unknown link between the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") and multiple mental health disorders.

Wealth, Poverty, and the Brain: A Q&A With Kimberly Noble

Are poorer children deprived of opportunities for healthy cognitive development? How can we improve these conditions? Kimberly Noble, MD, Ph.D., offers some insight.
Image by Peter Zamiska

United Airlines and the Short Fuse of Social Media

By John Nosta on April 11, 2017 in The Digital Self
The temptation to throw companies and people off the cliff is a real problem.

Are Humans Adapted to Modern Environments?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on April 11, 2017 in The Human Beast
Our two main theories of human behavior do a poor job of explaining how humans change to meet the demands of varied environments – but we do.