Cognition Essential Reads

Rhetoric in the Wild

By Joachim I Krueger Ph.D. on October 23, 2017 in One Among Many
Many of our conversations are not well behaved.

Healing in the Aftermath of Las Vegas

Our brains take in the details of a mass tragedy, and organize them so that we have a sense of understanding and control --unless information, like motive, is missing.

Stress Makes It Harder to Recognize Danger

By Lydia Denworth on October 16, 2017 in Brain Waves
Sometimes stress heightens our awareness, but more often, it dulls our ability to respond to new threats. Recognizing the risk and reducing sources of stress can help.
Carl Pickhardt Ph. D.

Adolescence and the Use of Parental Worry

Not fun to do, and often given a bad name, worry can be constructive for both parent and adolescent to do.

The Science of Falling Out of Love

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on October 15, 2017 in Media Spotlight
New research explores the thorny question of how to cope after a failed relationship and what it can mean for long-term emotional health.

My Partner Cheated on Me—Should I Try to Make It Work?

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on October 12, 2017 in ExperiMentations
How do we decide whether to stay or go after someone cheats on us? New research sheds light on the decision-making process and helps us understand our own relationships.

The Pressure to Be Perfect

Perfectionistic thinking is different from having high expectations and a drive to do a good job, in that the pressure to be perfect brings with it a host of negative thoughts.

The Art of Nostalgia

Nostalgia is an aesthetic form of memory, and our relation to our nostalgic memories is much like that of a painter to a work of art.

Synchronizing Brain Waves Can Turbocharge Executive Function

By Christopher Bergland on October 09, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A pioneering new study has identified a surprising way to turbocharge executive functions. Someday, this method could be used to treat neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

Taking a Stand When Taking a Knee

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on October 09, 2017 in Mental Mishaps
How we rewrite and romanticize memories of protests.
Angus Third Pounder/Adam Kuban/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Why Are Most of Us So Good at Deceiving Ourselves?

By Barb Cohen on October 08, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
Columbus, cognitive dissonance and autism shed light on our coping strategies.

The Age of Centaurs

By Gary Klein Ph.D. on October 06, 2017 in Seeing What Others Don't
Forget about man versus machine, the real challenge is man plus machine. Humans add value to advanced computer models and AI in fields such as chess and weather forecasting.

Seeking Redemption: The Rage of Alzheimer’s

By Greg O'Brien on October 04, 2017 in On Pluto
Profane language can be common in Alzheimer’s. An expression of gut rage and loss of filter, along with inadvertent grabbing, kicking, pushing, and throwing.

Why Is Doing Arithmetic With Fractions So Difficult?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 30, 2017 in Talking Apes
We may never use algebra or geometry, but we can’t avoid fractions in our daily lives. Although fractions are difficult, there are ways to improve the way we teach them.

Can Smartphones Make Us More Absent-Minded?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on September 29, 2017 in Media Spotlight
Can smartphones and other digital devices make us more absent-minded in general? New research explores the role that smartphone use can have on our ability to pay attention.

Should I Boycott Football?

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on September 29, 2017 in Mental Mishaps
I love football. I played when I was young. I appreciate the beautiful ballet of violence. But I wonder if I should boycott the sport.
David Ropeik

Who's in Charge, Your Mind or Your Brain?

By David Ropeik on September 27, 2017 in How Risky Is It, Really?
Do we consciously think for ourselves, or does our brain subconsciously do our thinking for us? A fun test with a famous intellectual raised, but failed to answer, the question.

Parents Who Fight for Bilingual Education

By Francois Grosjean Ph.D. on September 26, 2017 in Life as a Bilingual
Groups of parents working with teachers and school officials have helped found dual-language programs in New York public schools. Dr. Fabrice Jaumont tells us about it.

Expressive Writing Liberates the Mind from Chronic Worrying

By Christopher Bergland on September 24, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Taking a few minutes to jot down your innermost thoughts and feelings can offload chronic worries and makes your brain more efficient, according to a new study.

What Narcissists Won’t Tell You About their Past

Although no one’s memory is perfect, memory in people high in narcissism is particularly flawed, especially when it comes to their flaws. New research shows why they're so biased.

B Vitamins Play Important Roles in Mental Health Care

Are you curious about the role of vitamin supplementation in mental health? B vitamins may help reduce symptoms of alcohol abuse, depressed mood, cognitive impairment and dementia.

Refining the Definition of Synchronicity

Our cosmos is finely tuned by numerous constants without which life on Earth would not be. Some of these coincidences have probabilities much lower than any personal coincidence.

Thinking Like Artificial Intelligence: What's in a Photo?

By Jennifer Golbeck Ph.D. on September 22, 2017 in Your Online Secrets
The first article in a series that challenges us to think about human intelligence and how it relates to AI.

Finding (and Making) Sweet Spots in Your Creative Process

By Wilma Koutstaal Ph.D. on September 21, 2017 in Our Innovating Minds
Where's your sweet spot for coming up with good ideas?

Why We Need To Structure Our Days Differently Than We Think

Are you using your brain as effectively as you could be? A few changes can go a long way.

Authentic or Disingenuous?

By Harold Sigall Ph.D. on September 19, 2017 in Wishful Thoughts
How are you deciding whether others are sincere? Are you being misled?

Why Do We Love the View From High Above?

By Andrea Bartz on September 19, 2017 in The Wandering Mind
The weird psychological reason you'll take an elevator to the 102nd floor.

What’s Your Friendship Style?

By Lydia Denworth on September 18, 2017 in Brain Waves
No one way of making friends works for everyone, but some form of connection is essential.

Low Brain Cholesterol—Separating Fact from Fiction

By Georgia Ede MD on September 17, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
How vegan diets and cholesterol-lowering drugs affect mood and memory.

Right Brain and Left Brain Share Duties On "As Needed" Basis

By Christopher Bergland on September 17, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Growing evidence debunks the myth of creativity being seated in the "right brain." A new Duke study illuminates how the left brain and right brain can share duties when necessary.