Essential Reads

Are Dogs Self-Aware?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on May 24, 2017 in The Human Beast
The standard test of self-awareness is being able to recognize ourselves in a mirror. Although chimpanzees pass this test with flying colors, dogs flunk.

Consciousness and Information

Our conscious experience contains and depends upon many different kinds of information. What is the relationship between how information is processed and conscious awareness?
istock.com

Suicide Is a Scary Word

Passive thoughts of suicide should alert every therapist to the possibility that darkness is looming.

Do You Learn More When You Make Your Notes Beautiful?

Taking beautiful notes might help students learn.

More Posts on Cognition

Paul Nunez

What Makes the Human Brain “Human?” Part 2

How do “small world” connections contribute to brain complexity and a healthy mind?

Watch Your Language!

"She gave her baby up for adoption," What's wrong with that?
Dora Calott Wang

What's Up with Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar disorder is as malignant as cancer, says Robert Post.

Can You Understand the Different Types of Dog Growls?

Not all dog growls are equivalent. Particular sound components determine how we interpret any growl.

How to Get Your Alienating Ex Out of Your Head

What does it mean when your ex is saying bad things about you inside your own head?

A Summer Project: Improve Your Handwriting

Learning any new skill changes your brain. Want a new project for the summer? Improve your handwriting. It will help your math and make you a more effective learner.

No, Really, I'm a Good Patient!

You'll never hear a doctor call a patient Good or Bad. Why do patients call themselves one or the other all the time? What do they mean? Why should doctors know about this?

Why Are Some States "Tighter" Than Others?

State-level differences in making and enforcing rules can help us understand why illicit drug use is lower—and levels of cautiousness are higher—in the South than in the West.

Empathy in Literature and Film

By Paul Thagard Ph.D. on May 18, 2017 in Hot Thought
Empathy in literature and film works by three modes of empathy: verbal analogies, physiological mimicry, and non-verbal simulation of chains of emotional experiences.

Cancer, Keeping Active, and the Mind

By Anne Moyer Ph.D. on May 17, 2017 in Beyond Treatment
Cancer treatment can make one reluctant to get moving.

Who Has Psychic Powers?

What happens when you put psychics and people with ESP to the test?

What You Should Be Thinking When You Argue With Your Partner

Do you argue with your partner often? A little self-awareness can go a long way.

Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome: Subclinical Version

Can cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome be inherited? Do subtle versions live among us?
StockSnap.io

Thinking of Anxiety as the Symptom, Not the Problem

Instead of seeking to get rid of anxiety immediately, we’re able to work with it, be with it, and understand it.

If We Could Talk With the Prairie Dogs, Just Imagine it ...

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on May 14, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Renowned Northern Arizona University researcher Dr. Con Slobodchikoff argues we can talk with these linguistic rodents and learn a lot about the evolution of language from them.

The Habit Replacement Loop

Replace your bad habits with good ones! New research on habit formation offers information on how to improve student success by establishing a new normal in learning.

Synchronicity Statistics

Every coincidence has a probability of happening. That does not mean that probability explains most coincidences.

Naps Help Preschoolers Learn Language

By Temma Ehrenfeld on May 12, 2017 in Open Gently
Small children learn words more easily if they get enough sleep.

Why Do People Believe Things that Aren’t True?

In the face of our “post-truth” era of politics, it’s hard to know what to believe. According to research, whether we know it or not, most of us harbor false beliefs. Do you?

Who Moved My Virtual cheese ?

When you mess with mental models, you run a major risk of slowing down and annoying your customers, potentially losing them all together.

Psychological Science says Trump is a Four Year Old

By Noam Shpancer Ph.D. on May 12, 2017 in Insight Therapy
It’s quite impossible to watch president Trump and remain unperturbed. But why?

You are Never Too Old to Learn a New Language

What are the challenges and rewards of learning a new language? Ann Patty, author of "Living with a dead language: My romance with Latin", tells us about her recent experience.

After-School Programs Do Work!

Every year, after-school programs keep children safe, improve physical fitness, and support growth in literacy.

Cannabis Reverses Brain Aging in Mice

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on May 09, 2017 in Cravings
Struggling with memory loss? Finding it hard to learn new things? Scientists are one step closer to finding a treatment for the loss of cognitive function associated with aging.
Public Domain

The Creative Process of Psychotherapy

Effective psychotherapy is a mutual creative process between therapist and patient.

Reverse Engineering the Brain

Can we learn everything about the brain by studying individual brain cells? To answer this question, we need to consider emergent properties and self-organization.

Make Negative Thinking Work for You

By Temma Ehrenfeld on May 08, 2017 in Open Gently
Don't insist on "positive thinking." Aim to think clearly.

Risky Business—Your Grandparents, Risk-taking and Falls

Can risk-taking explain the link between older age and increased falls? New research suggests so.

Colors, Sounds, Tingles

By Maureen Seaberg on May 08, 2017 in Sensorium
Synesthesia bonus -- tingles!