Essential Reads

Can Dogs Teach Other Dogs to Speak?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on September 28, 2016 in Canine Corner
A dog can learn how to make and use specific sounds for communication simply by observing other dogs

10 Things to Know About Déjà Vu

Acceptance of déjà vu has widened in recent decades. Research psychologists are just beginning to understand this phenomenon.

If You Want to Become More Mindful, Check Your Watch

By Karl Albrecht Ph.D. on September 24, 2016 in BrainSnacks
if the “monkey mind,” as the Eastern practitioners call it, has a mind of its own, how does one become more “mindful?” How can your mind stay focused, when it loves to wander?

What Eye Contact Can Do to You

Eye contact has the power to alter our behavior, attention, memory, and appraisal of who's looking at us. Is that always a good thing?

More Posts on Cognition

The Cerebellum May Drive Sex Distinction in Our Social Brain

By Christopher Bergland on September 29, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
How do sex differences play a role in the development of our social brain? A new study on specific neurons in the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") offers some valuable clues.

Body Language Says it All: Hillary Hides, Donald Emotes

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on September 28, 2016 in The Fallible Mind
Watch what the debaters do rather than listening to what they say. The best way to judge people trying to persuade you is with the volume turned off.

Why Aren't You Speaking The Right Language? Part 2

By Francois Grosjean Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in Life as a Bilingual
Bilinguals often associate a particular language to a specific speaker. How do they react when they are confronted with a language they do not expect?

President Trump?

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on September 27, 2016 in Mental Mishaps
Donald Trump is easily the most unusual and risky presidential candidate I’ve seen in my life. And that may be a winning strategy in this year’s election.

The Power of Positively Priming the Therapist

By Goal Auzeen Saedi Ph.D. on September 27, 2016 in Millennial Media
We've all heard the adage that we are what we think. Turns out what your therapist thinks can go a long ways in your therapy treatment.

Can Sophistication in Writing Be Measured?

What those puzzling scores at the bottom of articles really mean.

The Mindspan Diet

By The Book Brigade on September 27, 2016 in The Author Speaks
America’s dietary recommendations may not be in the best interests of cognitive longevity.

Super Senses

By Maureen Seaberg on September 27, 2016 in Sensorium
The senses exist on a continuum with a wide range of perception across humanity.

To Empathize, Don't Trust Your Gut

By Temma Ehrenfeld on September 26, 2016 in Open Gently
Thinking—rather than guessing—is a better path to accurate empathy.

White Sensitivity Is Like Black Sensitivity

By Michael Karson Ph.D., J.D. on September 26, 2016 in Feeling Our Way
Being put in your body unexpectedly is status-lowering, whatever color your skin is.

Debate Scorecard for the Presidency: Trust

The selection of our next president is fast approaching. What is the criteria you will use to make that selection? Here's a scorecard to help you really think, consider and decide.

Trust Your Gut—There's Nothing Woo-Woo About the Vagus Nerve

By Christopher Bergland on September 23, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
A new study found that financial traders who trust their gut feelings and have grace under pressure are more successful. What is the physiological explanation for this phenomenon?

Can a Harvard Degree Actually Reduce Patient Trust?

I have made a conscious decision to forgo hanging my diplomas. Here’s why.

Get the Red Out

Redness of the skin concerns people, but may lead patients to find causes that weren't involved or stop treaments that were actually working.

Does It Take Faith to Be an Atheist?

By Phil Zuckerman Ph.D. on September 22, 2016 in The Secular Life
People often claim that it takes more faith to be an atheist than a believer. This is incorrect.

Changing Someone's Mind

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on September 22, 2016 in How To Do Life
Tips I'm only moderately confident in...but they're the best I can come up with.

Bridging Difference: Beyond Us vs. Them

By Amy Banks on September 21, 2016 in Wired For Love
The human community is at a seminal crossroads. Are we going to use our brains to build edifices that cement the association between difference and danger?

Do We Control Our Own Purchasing Habits?

By Liraz Margalit Ph.D. on September 20, 2016 in Behind Online Behavior
Flaws in our decision-making ability are fuel for the market. In certain situations we are especially susceptible to external influences.

Taste Freeze

By William Poundstone on September 20, 2016 in Head in the Cloud
Mom jeans, dad bod, and taste freeze? Data show that we stop listening to new pop music after the age of 33.

A Weird Trick To Free Yourself From Your Identity

By Gleb Tsipursky Ph.D. on September 19, 2016 in Intentional Insights
Are you worried about your identity labels limiting your freedom? This simple reframing trick could be all you need!

The Truth About the Law of Attraction

By Neil Farber M.D, Ph.D. on September 18, 2016 in The Blame Game
Millions of people are unsuccessful at achieving goals using the Law of Attraction (LOA). The reason? The LOA does not exist! Hear why from a certified LOA expert.

What Teachers Need to Know About Their Students' Brains

By Eric Haseltine Ph.D. on September 17, 2016 in Long Fuse, Big Bang
Hot-off-the-press research suggests a radically new way to teach

Your Left Cerebellar Hemisphere May Play a Role in Cognition

By Christopher Bergland on September 17, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Traditionally, the cerebellum has been considered a "non-thinking" part of our brain. However, a new study reports that specific cerebellar brain regions are involved in cognition.

Remembering 9/11, Who Are We, and Who Do We Want to Be?

By Ryan P. Brown Ph.D. on September 16, 2016 in Honor Bound
As Americans reflect on the meaning of 9/11, our response reveals our cultural values and beliefs.

5 Brain-Based Reasons to Teach Handwriting in School

Did you know that handwriting will make you and your child smarter than keyboarding?

What Do Brexit and Universal Grammar Have in Common?

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on September 14, 2016 in Language in the Mind
Why are languages broadly similar? The Universal Grammar hypothesis meets Brexit: both are presently intangible.

Wisdom in the White House and Older Presidents

By Alan Castel Ph.D. on September 13, 2016 in Metacognition and the Mind
Should we be concerned and/or excited about older-aged presidents in the White House, as old age is associated with wisdom?

7 Ways to Enhance Your Memory

By Ryan Anderson on September 13, 2016 in The Mating Game
Have you ever wondered if there is a simple way to improve your memory? This article gives you 7 evidence-based techniques you can use to become far better at retaining information

To Get Over a Breakup, Change Your Mindset

Although breakups are painful, some people are better able to pick themselves up and move on, while others ruminate for months and years in ways that hurt their chances of success

Chicken Phobias and Other Matters of Concern

By Fredric Neuman M.D. on September 11, 2016 in Fighting Fear
A contrast between agoraphobia and more specific phobias. A presentation of a question that stumped me during a radio broadcast.