Essential Reads

The Right Dose of Screen Time for Kids

By Vanessa LoBue, Ph.D. on October 22, 2016 in The Baby Scientist
On Friday, the American Academy of Pediatrics changed their policy on screen time for children under the age of 2 on Friday. Here's what the new policy means for your kids.

How Will Artificial Intelligence Change Education and Work?

A new report titled “Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030” explores the role of AI in various aspects of society and considers implications for our future.

How to Build Your Belief in Yourself

Don't let your mind limit your potential. Train your brain to think differently.

5 Ways Our Body Language Speaks Loud and Clear

We constantly send out signals through our nonverbal communication, often without realizing it. A new study shows how these can impact our success at work.

More Posts on Cognition

Personality and the Brain, Part 8

Knowing how the brain works, how it specializes for certain tasks and what triggers changes in the brain’s structural connections can help you change your personality.

"Help Me Stop Thinking About My Ex Girlfriend"

"She’s all fine and dandy, and I struggle with this every day," Jim said after his girlfriend of several years broke up with him. Read on to find out how people like Jim can cope.

Look Out Below!

It's a good idea to pay attention. It's not a good idea to pay too much attention. But how much attention is too much?

"State of the Animals 2016": An Interview With Ralph Nader

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on October 23, 2016 in Animal Emotions
In a radio interview Ralph Nader and I had an informed discussion about the cognitive and emotional lives of nonhuman animals and how we use them in various human-centered venues.

Psychosis and the Creation of Poetry

By Albert Rothenberg on October 22, 2016 in Creative Explorations
Poetry creation is often thought to result from the upsurge of unconscious process. As characteristic of schizophrenic thinking, such upsurge must be molded by creative cognition.

Personality and the Brain, Part 6

After his brain injury, Derek Amato became more agreeable and empathetic, suggesting that personality is not set in stone.

Personality and the Brain, Part 5

People's psychic abilities can be explained by a peculiar crossing of the senses.

Debate Scorecard for Hiring the President: How to Evaluate

How to bypass your biases and explore proven leadership competencies and derailers for the most important hiring evaluation. Score each candidate so you can ne be more objective.
Courtesy Barnet Bain

Reclaiming Your Creative Self

By Barnet Bain on October 21, 2016 in Doing and Being
The key to finding resilience, courage, and wonder in a changing world.

Einstein, the Outcast

By Lybi Ma on October 20, 2016 in Brainstorm
Guest post by David Bodanis
Gerd Altmann/Pixabay

Over-Optimism, Overconfidence, and the JUDO Framework

Thinking positively can be good, but does over-optimism harm or hurt you business? Here are a few tips to temper your bias.

Political Persuasion: Aim for the Heart, Not the Head

So long as a message is emotionally congruent and consistent, both fear and hope can be equally pervasive.

Personality and the Brain, Part 4

When the bossy left hemisphere is “shushed” and the creative right brain is allowed to “speak,” artistic talent proliferates.

How to Tell if You Should Avoid Contact With Your Ex

If you and your ex cannot or do not intend to treat each other like true friends, then needless to say, it is best to end all contact ASAP.

Do “Brain Games” Sharpen Your Mind?

Over the past decade, scientists have zeroed in on “brain training” to improve cognitive skills. But does it work?

Personality and the Brain, Part 3

When the connection between the emotional brain and the front of the brain is damaged, people have trouble interpreting or feeling their emotions.

The Decline of Trust

By Robert L. Leahy Ph.D. on October 18, 2016 in Anxiety Files
In almost all areas of our lives trust has declined—and it has been on the decline for decades.

Personality and the Brain, Part 2

“Leigh used to be the class clown,” Amber said. “She would immediately shift a sinister atmosphere into a cheerful one. Now she barely smiles."

Personality and the Brain, Part 1

One evening on October 11, 2009, life took a dramatic turn for 41-year-old Leigh Erceg.

Seeing Beauty

By Bernard L. De Koven on October 17, 2016 in On Having Fun
Are things like beauty, love, fun, joy and faith aspects of an alternate reality?

A Drug to Improve Performance and Creativity

If study drugs give you a significant cognitive advantage, do you "cheat" if you take them? Do you become a different person?

Our Evolving Sense of Identity

Renew you spirit with these scientific discoveries.

What's Your Dog’s IQ?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on October 14, 2016 in Talking Apes
My dog’s smarter than your dog—and there’s a doggie IQ test to prove it!

Your Brain and That "Other National Deficit"

Recent research indicates that our brain's susceptibility to false memories of the past may actually come in handy in our encounters with unfamiliar situations in the future.

From “My Bad” to “I'm Sorry": Trump's Evolving Apology

Trump has apologized . . . sort of. He said the words, more than once, yet many voters are unconvinced. Why? We forgive (and often forget), when apologies are authentic.

Not Just Bilingual—Biliterate!

An increasing number of states are offering a Seal of Biliteracy to high school students who can read and write well in two languages. We think this is a good idea.

How to Keep a Dog From Jumping Up on People

You can keep a dog from jumping on people by considering the dog's behavior, and how people usually respond to the behavior.

Running May Help Repair Some Types of Brain Damage

By Christopher Bergland on October 12, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Aerobic exercise triggers the production of a molecule that can repair some types of brain damage and speeds up communication between brain regions, new study finds.

The Extraordinary Sensorium of Brian Wilson

By Maureen Seaberg on October 11, 2016 in Sensorium
How Beach Boy Brian Wilson, deaf in one ear, manages that remarkable sound...
<a href=''>wavebreakmediamicro / 123RF Stock Photo</a>

For the Public Good: How Much Difference Can You Make?

By F. Diane Barth L.C.S.W. on October 10, 2016 in Off the Couch
Have you given up on trying to make a difference in the world? Research says that you might want to revise your strategy.