Essential Reads

The Grass Moment

We Need to Help Kids Become "Reflective Rebels"

Writing by Hand Makes It Easier to Think

Don't stop taking notes by hand.

Do the “Eyes” Have It?

If People Are Not Looking at You Do They Know What You Are Saying and Feeling?

Why I Can't..... or Why Can't I?

The beliefs we carry write the script of our life.

Recent Posts on Child Development

Using Time-Outs: Top 5 Mistakes Parents Make

Time-outs do not cause brain damage and are an effective strategy to reduce negative behavior in children. However, they can easily be used in less than optimal ways. Keeping in mind these 5 common errors can help parents get the most out of this valuable technique.

The Grass Moment

By Alfie Kohn on April 24, 2015 in The Homework Myth
If we want to raise kids who aren't self-centered, we should stop emphasizing compliance and instead foster a willingness to question authority

Would Teaching Doctors to Cook Solve the Obesity Problem?

Attacking the obesity problem by teaching docs to cook. Hmm. Are there really families who have missed the message about cooking? And if people know they ought to cook but don’t know how, what could a physician say that would really change anything? Are doctors going to start conducting knife-skills tutorials between vaccinations?There's a better solution.

Writing by Hand Makes It Easier to Think

By Temma Ehrenfeld on April 23, 2015 in Open Gently
Remember pens and paper? They help us think.

The Perfect Storm: Twitter, Marijuana and the Teen Brain

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on April 23, 2015 in Singletons
Young Twitter users favor marijuana. Teen Twitter chatter about “pot” is high and influential for the risk-prone teenage brain. Twitter, marijuana and the developing teenage brain create the potential for a perfect storm.

We Don't Repress Painful Childhood Memories

By Temma Ehrenfeld on April 22, 2015 in Open Gently
Most people remember incidents of sexual abuse as children though they may not have understood them.

How Not to Be Boring: Advice for Teen Introverts

By Sophia Dembling on April 22, 2015 in The Introvert's Corner
Teens crave and seem to admire risk taking. What can introverted teens do to scratch that itch?

Encouraging the Best From Your Child

Parents have so many worries, but by instituting some proactive strategies for positive reinforcement they may be able to affect healthy outcomes in their children.

Four Ways that Online Harassment Can Be Upsetting for Youth

By Michele Ybarra MPH, Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in Connected
What factors make some incidences of online harassment more upsetting to youth than others? While most Internet-using youth do not get harassed online, a fraction of youth harassed online are upset by the experience. Knowing what to look for can help us assist youth in need.

Do the “Eyes” Have It?

When We Have Our Face in Our Phone How Do We Listen to Someone Next to Us?

Homework: An Hour a Day Is All the Experts Say

How much time does your teen spend doing busy school work each night? According to a recent study, if it's more than one hour…then it's too much.

Why I Can't..... or Why Can't I?

Our beliefs and thoughts impact our lives more than any relationship.It would be wise to evaluate how we came to them and whether they truly serve us.

Are Athletes Good Role Models?

Being a sport superstar doesn’t automatically qualify a person to be a role model. What are the credentials for the job?

Developmental Dislike of Parents During Early Adolescence

One function of adolescence is to grow parent and adolescent apart. Dislike of parents is part of what allows this social separation to occur. Most important for parents to remember is that this loss of liking for parents does not mean any lessening of of adolescent love.

"Burn Book": An App for Bullying

For those over 30, or without teenage children, the term “Burn Book” may have no meaning. 0thers will recognize it as the iconic Treasury of Nastiness from the movie Mean Girls. Now it has become an app—one that enables anonymous bullying in specific, selected communities:

All Kids Lie To Their Parents. But When? How Much?

Respecting children's boundaries while staying strict and engaged is the best way to encourage them to share information and to keep them from lying.

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

All of us encounter experiences in life when we may be temporally overwhelmed by a negative emotion, be it anger, pressure, nervousness, despair, or confusion. In these situations, how we choose to “master the moment” can make the difference between proactive versus reactive, and confidence versus insecurity. Here are ten ways to be less reactive in difficult situations...

Motor Activity Improves Working Memory in Children with ADHD

A new study suggests that a majority of students with ADHD could perform better on classroom work, tests, and homework if they were allowed to sit on activity balls or exercise bikes while learning.

Fear of Intimacy and Closeness in Relationships

By Hal Shorey Ph.D. on April 18, 2015 in The Freedom to Change
Being in a relationship with someone who shuts down emotionally when times get tough is no fun. It’s also no fun to try your best only to have others accuse you of not being emotionally available. Learning where these avoidant personality styles come from can help you cope more effectively with stress in your relationships and have a more rewarding experience.

Why do we like our bully boss?

By Eyal Winter on April 18, 2015 in Feeling Smart
Check if you have a Stockholm Bias toward your Bully Boss.

Is Birth Order a Myth?

Most people believe that birth order shapes our personalities and has impact on the careers we choose, and the ways we behave. Is this real, or merely an illusion? What do we really know about birth order effects?

Meaningfully Salient Parenting

Meaningfully salient parenting can be spoken about, but, in essence, it is a deeply heartfelt and intimate engagement between parent and child, mother and father, and all within the family system.

Why Do Rich Kids Have Higher Standardized Test Scores?

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University recently reported that the academic “achievement gap” on standardized tests between lower-income and higher-income children is reflected in brain anatomy.

Bethlehem: A Subjective Travelogue

My love of the capacity of the human spirit to transcend all odds soared as I munched on a traditional oven-baked lamb dish. Across from me sat one of Holy Land Trust’s core team members, telling me bits of his story of opening up to the vision that fuels the organization. As hard as it was to be there, it was also a tiny slice of what’s humanly possible.

The Art of Friendships: Lessons from David and Goliath

By Todd B Kashdan Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Curious?
I have been thinking deeply about the importance of friendships. This is not the first post I have written on the topic. Here are some thoughts, extending the story laid out in Malcolm Gladwell's last book, David and Goliath....

The Hand that Rocks the Cradle Rules—But Whose Hand Is It?

The history of the nature/nurture controversy reveals fraud on the nurture side and developments in our view of nature that the imprinted brain theory readily explains.

Are Your Worst Nightmares Also Everyone Else's?

By E E Smith on April 16, 2015 in Not Born Yesterday
They are the grim subject of several centuries-old paintings, in which a black horse (or "night mare") hovers near a sleeping figure. They have been the terrifying theme of movies, past and present––from "I Wake Up Screaming" (1941), to the latest "Nightmare on Elm Street" flick. So, what exactly is a nightmare?

Does Your Baby Like Music?

Do you know what music your baby likes best? Can you even find out? We invented a way to let our babies choose music for themselves and it even helped them sleep better.

Parental Warmth: Simple, Powerful, and Often Challenging

Amidst all the chatter about parenting styles and techniques, it is easy to forget about the importance of warmth. This overlooked dimension is found to be critical to child development in study after study, so why don’t we give it the attention it deserves?

Women’s Pay Gap: Is it Children, Expectations, or Feminism?

It's time for the power structure of corporate and political America to better accommodate women and their families.