Child Development Essential Reads

Easing a Child’s Summer to School Transition

School is right around the corner but your child is still sleeping until noon and moving in slow motion. Here are some suggestions to help get them ready for the new year.

To Bribe or Not to Bribe

Reading incentive programs, where students get points or prizes, and sometimes even grades, for reading “fun” books, are a ubiquitous feature of many literacy programs.

Professional Misunderstanding of Parental Alienation

Until professionals attain an in-depth understanding of the actual dynamics of parental alienation, cases of severe alienation will continue to be discounted.

Video Games Stronger Than Morphine: U.S. Military

The Military has discovered that playing video games can be more effective than morphine in treating combat burn veterans—but what is this digital morphine doing to kids' brains?

Kids, Chimps, and Cooperation

By Art Markman Ph.D. on August 23, 2016 in Ulterior Motives
People are pretty good at sharing when they are cooperating. When does that ability develop? Is it uniquely human?

Talking About the Past With Your Child Builds Resilience

By inviting, validating, helping and supporting your child to construct coherent narratives, you teach skills for regulating emotions and building resilience.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

The Changing Reputation of Parents With Their Adolescent

It can be hard for parents to lose their positive reputation with the child to the more negative reputation with the adolescent.

Alison Gopnik’s Advice to Parents: Stop Parenting!

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on August 19, 2016 in Freedom to Learn
Everything Professor Gopnik says in The Gardener and the Carpenter indicates that our schooling system is very very wrong. So why does she point her finger at parents, not schools?

Can You Learn a Second Language After Childhood?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on August 19, 2016 in Talking Apes
While it’s true that that it’s easier to learn a language when you’re young, adults can still learn languages with the right motivation.

When Sibling Rivalry Goes Awry

You may remember the days in the not so distant past when you were the envy of friends and family. “Your kids get along so well,” they would gush.

Is Empty Nest a Myth?

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in Singletons
Is sending your child off to college as emotionally draining and stressful as having a newborn or raising a child during the middle school years? What new research tells us.

Play Is Serious Business

By Darby Saxbe Ph.D. on August 15, 2016 in Home Base
We evolved to learn through play. But the push towards academics has crowded out open playtime in schools. Play should be treated not as a privilege, but as a core part of learning

Wanting To Destroy Everything

By Nick Luxmoore on August 13, 2016 in Young People Up Close
Young people's appetite for destruction must be recognised if we are to forgive them.

Caught in a Stress Cycle

By Stuart Shanker DPhil on August 12, 2016 in Self-Reg
Stress cycles are impervious to ordinary self-help tips. Like “Devil’s snare”, the more you struggle the harder they grip. So it’s essential to understand when you’re caught in one

3 Keys To Finding Balance in Motherhood

Motherhood can be an excuse to give up on your dreams. Writer Yuko Grover offers tips to empower yourself and your children.

Chronic Stress and Mental Illness in Children and Teens

A child raised with constant exposure to chronic stress will negatively impact the still developing brain of the child.

Attenuation of Arousal: The Linchpin of Emotional Regulation

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on August 10, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Stress hormones grab our attention and prepare us to run or fight, in case action is required. Thereafter, arousal needs to be sharply reduced so we can assess the situation.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John, labeled for reuse Wikimedia commons

Why Attachment Theory Is All Sizzle and No Steak

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on August 10, 2016 in Standard Deviations
Attachment theory is a helpful research tool, but in clinical practice it imposes arbitrary, moralistic societal standards on relational and sexual desires.

How to Raise Your Kids With High—and Healthy—Self-Esteem

This post is about what, as a parent, you do to ensure that your children grow up with a more positive self-image than you yourself may have had when you were young.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Adolescence and the Parental Brain Trust

It can strengthen adolescent capacity to cope to have open access to what, by living longer, parents have come to know.

Is Parental Authority 'Bullying'?

Perhaps we model (non-physical) aggressions in our homes, even as we decry the (re)enactment of these behaviors on the playground, in the hallways, on the bus, in the cafeteria.

Creating eBooks for Children - Let's Do It Together!

By Michael Hogan Ph.D. on July 27, 2016 in In One Lifespan
Story books for children have a long history and are universally valued by children and parents. Digital stories for children offer new ways to share stories and advance literacy.

The Top Five Gifts of Pokemon Go to Parents

"Thanks Pokemon Go for giving my kids a modern version of a 1970s summer!”

Work-Family Conflict... and Its Far Prettier Sister

By Yael Schonbrun Ph.D. on July 21, 2016 in Moderating
Are you overlooking the gifts of work-family enrichment?

Epigenetic Mechanism in the Cerebellum Drives Motor Learning

New research pinpoints how we learn new motor skills such as riding a bicycle, playing the piano, driving a car, etc.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Identity Experimentation in Early and Mid Adolescence

Adolescence is partly about experimentation with self-definition to try out and find out what identity truly fits.

Is It Possible to Invest Equally in All of Your Children?

Anyone with more than one child knows the balancing act of trying to treat your kids the same. Is it wasted effort?

Understanding Behavioral Therapy for Autism

Long-term planning for children with autism requires patience and diligence. Behavioral therapy, as time and labor-intensive as it seems, remains the foundation of skill building.

Parents Affect Their Children’s View of Intelligence

By Art Markman Ph.D. on June 30, 2016 in Ulterior Motives
It is not surprising that parents influence their children's beliefs about intelligence. How they do it is surprising.

6 Benefits for Children of “Older Mothers”

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on June 28, 2016 in Singletons
Much is said about the benefits—and drawbacks—of women waiting to have babies, but what are the potential pluses for the children of older mothers?