Child Development Essential Reads

Work-Family Conflict... and Its Far Prettier Sister

By Yael Schonbrun Ph.D. on July 21, 2016 in Moderating
Are you overlooking the gifts of work-family enrichment?

Epigenetic Mechanism in the Cerebellum Drives Motor Learning

New research pinpoints how we learn new motor skills such as riding a bicycle, playing the piano, driving a car, etc.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Identity Experimentation in Early and Mid Adolescence

Adolescence is partly about experimentation with self-definition to try out and find out what identity truly fits.

Is It Possible to Invest Equally in All of Your Children?

Anyone with more than one child knows the balancing act of trying to treat your kids the same. Is it wasted effort?

Understanding Behavioral Therapy for Autism

Long-term planning for children with autism requires patience and diligence. Behavioral therapy, as time and labor-intensive as it seems, remains the foundation of skill building.

Parents Affect Their Children’s View of Intelligence

By Art Markman Ph.D. on June 30, 2016 in Ulterior Motives
It is not surprising that parents influence their children's beliefs about intelligence. How they do it is surprising.

6 Benefits for Children of “Older Mothers”

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on June 28, 2016 in Singletons
Much is said about the benefits—and drawbacks—of women waiting to have babies, but what are the potential pluses for the children of older mothers?

Youngest, Only Children and Daughters at Risk for Obesity?

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on June 16, 2016 in Singletons
Studies find the likelihood of a child being overweight is related to birth order, gender, or the absence of siblings. Are the studies “fat” with flaws?

The Compelling Illusion of Free Will

By David Ludden Ph.D. on June 15, 2016 in Talking Apes
Conscious choice is an afterthought of decision making, not a precursor to it.
By Jen W [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Executive Functions on Vacation

By Jessica Garrett Mills PhD on June 14, 2016 in On Track
Are your kids using this summer to practice critical skills for the fall? You can help.

How Much Sleep Is Required for Optimal Health? Age Matters.

For the first time, sleep experts have reached a consensus on how much sleep is required to optimize psychological and physical well-being at various stages of the human lifespan.

Can We Take the Eye Out of the Adolescent Storm?

The self-help industry is a $10 billion a year industry and Los Angeles is arguably the capital. However, is it even effective?
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Summer Sleep and School Achievement

Keeping a regular sleep schedule in summer may be beneficial when school starts.

Can You "Grow Out Of" ADHD?

ADHD is typically thought of as a childhood illness. Still, the number of adults living with ADHD is greater than the number of adults who live with OCD and schizophrenia.

Cities, Children, and Psychosis

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on June 01, 2016 in Media Spotlight
Are children who grow up in cities more vulnerable to developing mental illness later in life? A new research study raises disturbing implications about the impact of city life.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Adolescence and the Power of Personal Challenge

When it comes to facing and creating challenges growing up, a young person never knows all they can do until they try.

Central Planning and U.S Child Psychopharmacology

Is there overcontrol of the prescription of antipsychotics to children and adolescents in the U.S.?

The Infant “Crying It Out” Debate: Chapter 615

A new Australian study looks at two different infant sleep interventions and whether they work or cause damage.

Can You See Yourself as Good Only by Seeing Yourself as Bad?

All children need—and desperately—to establish a secure bond with their caretakers. After all, absent such a vital connection, how can they not feel anxious and apprehensive?

Helping Children Succeed: Brain Science in the Classroom

By Claudia M Gold M.D. on May 24, 2016 in Child in Mind
Paul Tough grew to recognize that the qualities that help children succeed are not "skills" that are "taught" but rather qualities that develop in early relationships
Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

5 Top Parenting Challenges and How to Deal with Them

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on May 24, 2016 in Singletons
Tweaking how you respond to tantrums or aggression, whining or back talk can put an end to power struggles and create loving, lasting bonds with your children.

ADHD Is Overdiagnosed, Here's Proof

By Allen J Frances M.D. on May 23, 2016 in Saving Normal
Being the youngest kid in the class puts you at great risk for inappropriate ADHD diagnosis and treatment. We should let kids outgrow immaturity, not treat it with a pill.

How Can We Best Help Underrepresented and Talented Students?

The story of how a university-charter district partnership made an early college high school.

Imagine Me Gone

Despite popular myths about seasonality of suicides, rates actually spike in late spring and early summer rather than during the holidays or in the depths of winter.

Helping Children Become Nurturers

Caring for others is a central mandate for adults as parents, caregivers to the elderly or helpers for those with disabilities. Can children grow into nurturers?

Early Adolescence, Loss of Confidence, and Fears of Trying

Confidence motivates trying. Most early adolescents leave some confidence behind when they separate from childhood, and now they have some building back up of themselves to do.

What's the Big Deal About Bathrooms?

What the North Carolina bathroom bill means for kids in schools

What Happens When We Give Antidepressants to Girls?

By Claudia M Gold M.D. on May 09, 2016 in Child in Mind
When we jump to medicate young girls without protecting time to listen to the full story, we miss opportunity for prevention while placing future mothers in an untenable position

Should Your Child Take a Gap Year?

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on May 04, 2016 in How To Do Life
Malia Obama is bringing attention to a wise option for many kids. For yours?

What Is a "Good Enough Mother"?

Being a "good enough mother" involves a balancing act between two equally important things for a child's healthy cognitive development and future happiness.