Child Development Essential Reads

Why Social Media is NOT Smart for Middle School Kids

Wondering why your middle schooler's social media use has ratcheted up your stress levels? Understanding the brain at this age can help you can take back control.

Preventing Teens From Abusing Alcohol

A child who feels a loving bond with a parent, will feel valuable and have more of an ability to withstand peer pressure.

Caution: Your Tween May be Stressing Over Snap Streaks

Stopping your tween from continuing a Snapchat streak can easily make him feel like you are forcing him to commit social suicide. He will bargain and beg to keep his streaks going.

Bringing Down the Cost of Healthcare

By Kathryn Seifert Ph.D. on March 21, 2017 in Stop The Cycle
There are 3 effective ways to bring down to cost of healthcare without reducing quality or outcomes. These include prevention, early treatment and integrated care.

Mindful in the Classroom: New Lessons in Mental Literacy

A new age of neuroscientific literacy is beginning in the classroom.
Pixabay

Mirror Neurons, Empathy, and the First Memories of Life

By Arthur J. Clark Ed.D. on March 19, 2017 in Dawn of Memories
How neuroscience informs the meaning of early childhood recollections.

Social Norms, Moral Judgments, and Irrational Parenting

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on March 19, 2017 in Freedom to Learn
We are all conformists; it’s part of human nature. But sometimes our conformist nature leads us to do things that are downright silly or, worse, tragic.

What Is the Future of Genetic Testing?

Anxious about the onslaught of genetic tests? A new book weeds through the morass.

Parental Alienation and the Power of Metaphors

Sometimes the only way out of a painful parent-child conflict is to go deeper into the child's pain.

Empowering Youth to Become Civically Engaged

By Amber A. Hewitt Ph.D. on March 17, 2017 in You, Empowered
Wondering how to talk to youth about politics? Empower them to become civically engaged.

Helping Young Children Understand and Build Friendships

By Kyle D. Pruett M.D. on March 13, 2017 in Once Upon a Child
Play, from early in our lives, creates the vocabulary of friendship.

In Preschool, Quality Counts the Most

But does preschool really help kids perform better over their academic careers? The answer is complicated.
Charles Darwin/Public Domain

Why Does Autism Still Exist?

By Barb Cohen on March 07, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
Some gene variants associated with autism are also significantly associated with high intelligence. “Smart” genes are advantageous from an evolutionary standpoint, so they persist.

What the Terrible Twos Can and Can't Do

Having a toddler can be quite "terrible" at times. Here's what science says about why toddlers can be such a handful.

Anger: A Misunderstood Feeling

If curiosity, or interest, is the most under-appreciated feeling, anger may be the most misunderstood.
Ambermb/Pixabay

Earlier School Start Times for Elementary School Students

What Evidence Exists about Relations Between Early School Start Times and Outcomes for Young Children?

Autism in the South Pacific: A Different Way of Seeing?

By John Elder Robison on February 26, 2017 in My Life With Asperger's
Were Polynesian navigators who settled the Pacific autistic? Americans are used to thinking about autism in the context of disability. Other societies may have seen it different
"drinking water"/darwin Bell/CC BY 2.0

Finding the "Why" of a Special-Needs Child's Behavior

By Barb Cohen on February 23, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
Behavior is a form of communication, and more often than not, especially in young children, it is not communicating a desire to be non-compliant or troublesome.

Preschool, Nanny, Parental Care, Daycare? What’s Best?

For the most part, when parents are warm, nurturing, responsive, and engaged, their children thrive. Family life is what matters most to a young child’s development.

Adolescence: Your Parenting Work Is Not Over Yet

A parent’s job changes at a child’s adolescence. Be available while letting go. Argue. Laugh. Love the person your child really is, underneath all the identities they’re trying on.

When Children Lie

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on February 10, 2017 in Media Spotlight
Research into how effective adults are in detecting deception in children have turned up some surprising findings.

Motor Skills, Movement, and Math Performance Are Intertwined

By Christopher Bergland on February 10, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
There is growing evidence that children who are physically active do better in school. A new study found that kids who move their bodies while learning math get higher test scores.

Margaret Mead and the Great Samoan Nurture Hoax

Margaret Mead’s claim that nurture prevailed over nature in Samoan childhood and adolescence has been shown to be completely fictitious.

Finding Some Middle Ground in the War on Sleep Training

By Vanessa LoBue, Ph.D. on February 06, 2017 in The Baby Scientist
Whether it's harmful to sleep train your baby has become a controversial issue for parents. Here's some research suggesting that sleep training might be nothing to lose sleep over.

How Learning Theory Can Help STEM Educators

By APA Division 15 on February 06, 2017 in PsychEd
Is traditional lecture-style teaching the best technique for large science courses? Student-centered learning techniques provide alternatives to lecturing.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Teaching the Early Adolescent About Freedom

Adolescence are concerned with getting freedom to grow -- freedom from from old restraints and freedom for new opportunity. Parents need to speak to both concerns.

Managing Playdates

You can ease their separation by giving them some advance notice.

Boys Will Be Boys—Even If Raised Believed to Be Girls

Boys born seeming to be girls and socialised as such revert to male after puberty in ~90% of cases, providing an acid test of nature versus nurture.

Beyond 50 Shades Darker: Debunking Popular Myths About BDSM

By Michael Aaron, Ph.D. on February 03, 2017 in Standard Deviations
With the upcoming release of "Fifty Shades Darker," groundbreaking new research challenges stereotypes about BDSM participants portrayed in the "Fifty Shades" trilogy.

Childrearing Beliefs Were Best Predictor of Trump Support

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on February 01, 2017 in Freedom to Learn
By assessing the mindset of Trump's earliest supporters, this political scientist predicted that Trump would do far better in the election than most at that time believed.