Child Development Essential Reads

Believing in Ghosts, Goblins, and the Candy Witch

By Vanessa LoBue, Ph.D. on October 16, 2017 in The Baby Scientist
On Halloween, there is no doubt that children everywhere will have their minds on ghosts, goblins, and witches. But when do they learn that these characters aren't real?
Carl Pickhardt Ph. D.

Adolescence and the Use of Parental Worry

Not fun to do, and often given a bad name, worry can be constructive for both parent and adolescent to do.

Unraveling the Teenage Mind

Adolescence can be a mystifying time for everyone. This new book can help.

Did You Get the Parental Guidance You Needed Growing Up?

As a child, did you frequently feel behind the curve—or eight-ball? If so, what was that like for you? And why do you think it was such a struggle for you to blend in with others?

Very Young Male Syndrome

Perceiving life as short has many outcomes associated with it. Being male and having gotten stitches at some point are among them. Evolutionary psychology tells us why.

Senseless Killing and the Need to Know Why

By Carrie Barron M.D. on October 04, 2017 in The Creativity Cure
Thoughts and research regarding the motivation for cruel, senseless crimes.
Pixabay

Growing Up Too Fast? Early Adversity Affects Fear Responses

By Rebecca Compton Ph.D. on October 03, 2017 in Adopting Reason
The development of brain systems for detecting threats is affected in complex ways by early experiences of deprivation and neglect.

Logical Consequences: Helping Kids Learn from Their Mistakes

Punishment breeds resentment and retaliation. Logical consequences, when they're imposed with kindness and attention, can help kids take responsibility for their actions.

How Poverty Hurts Children

Children who are born into poverty have a lot of obstacles to success. A recent study suggests that the stresses of poverty make positive parenting difficult to practice.

Tears of Connection

By Guest Blogger on October 01, 2017 in The Guest Room
Infant tears may play an underappreciated part in getting parents' attention.

Why Is Doing Arithmetic With Fractions So Difficult?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 30, 2017 in Talking Apes
We may never use algebra or geometry, but we can’t avoid fractions in our daily lives. Although fractions are difficult, there are ways to improve the way we teach them.

Making Space in Kids' Literature for Mental Health Issues

By Guest Blogger on September 29, 2017 in The Guest Room
Today's kids are worried. Their books ought to help them.

Thank You, Child Welfare First Responders!

By Michael W Corrigan Ed.D. on September 28, 2017 in Kids Being Kids
In child welfare, every day is similar to experiencing a hurricane. For the dedicated workforce serving our nation’s most vulnerable... this one's for you!
Shutterstock: used with permission

Why Parents Should Put Down Their Smartphones

By Marilyn Wedge Ph.D. on September 26, 2017 in Suffer the Children
Eighty percent of a child's brain development occurs in the first three years of life. A child's brain development is fed through parent-child verbal and nonverbal interactions.

6 Parenting Practices You Probably Don’t Do, but Should

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on September 26, 2017 in Singletons
America’s children, and parents, are not tapping into a healthy and vital learning reservoir. Here are some Scandinavian parenting tips you'll want to consider adopting.

Another Example of Less Teaching Leading to More Learning

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on September 26, 2017 in Freedom to Learn
Williams identified the "worst" boys in a city of 300,000 people. He allowed them to pursue their own interests rather than attend classes, and here's what he found!

Courageous Daughters and Sensitive Sons

We must teach our daughters to be courageous and face their anxieties, and we must teach our sons to be sensitive and emotionally expressive.

Parents Who Fight for Bilingual Education

By Francois Grosjean Ph.D. on September 26, 2017 in Life as a Bilingual
Groups of parents working with teachers and school officials have helped found dual-language programs in New York public schools. Dr. Fabrice Jaumont tells us about it.

Born Good?

Economists, taking altruism seriously, find mixed evidence parents model it for their young children, stronger evidence that young kids are impressionable in this domain.

The Turing Test for Humans

By Yair Amichai-Hamburger Ph.D. on September 23, 2017 in The Social Net
Are robots gaining the emotional advantage on us?

Our Amazing Ability to Quickly Judge People's Personality

Even when we only get a chance to look at a person for a few seconds, our judgment of personality is fairly reliable. What is the reason behind this almost "magic" ability?
deposit photos : ID#1685783

Your Teen Needs More Sleep

By Michael J Breus Ph.D. on September 21, 2017 in Sleep Newzzz
A game plan for helping teens sleep better.

Mend the Gap Between Rich and Poor in School Achievement

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on September 20, 2017 in Freedom to Learn
The more rigid and authoritarian the school program is, the greater is the achievement gap between rich and poor. The more trusting and empowering it is, the smaller is the gap.

Praising Children May Encourage Them to Cheat

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 20, 2017 in Talking Apes
Praise is important for emotional growth. But new research shows that the way praise is worded—even for three-year-olds—can have a significant impact on their moral choices.
Shutterstock

The Emotional Toll of Childhood Obesity

By Steven Schlozman M.D. on September 19, 2017 in Grand Rounds
Why is still okay to tease "the fat kid?"
 Can Stock Photo/aleutie

The Problem of School Refusal

Most children look forward to the new school year with joy and enthusiasm. But for kids with school refusal, it is a nightmare for them and their parents.

Neuropsychological Evaluations 101

Thinking of getting your child "tested," but have no idea what that means? Read this FAQ to get some basic information about neuropsychological evaluations.

Young Yogis Rock

By Gail F. Melson Ph.D. on September 13, 2017 in Why the Wild Things Are
Contemplative practices, like yoga, mindfulness meditation, guided imagery and relaxation breathing can help children deal with stress, reduce anxiety and improve well-being.

The Children of 9/11: 16 Years On

By Adam Gerace Ph.D. on September 12, 2017 in Knowing Me, Knowing You
Thousands of children lost a parent on 9/11. More than a decade-and-a-half on, their stories are emerging.

The Importance of Cuddling

By Vanessa LoBue, Ph.D. on September 11, 2017 in The Baby Scientist
Doctors are starting to tout the importance of skin-to-skin contact for newborns. Here's what science says about why touch is so important for babies, and for you.