Child Development Essential Reads

What Do Children Know About Climate Change?

Children are the future stewards of our fragile ecosystem. What does research tell us about what children know and feel about environmental threats, such as climate change? What are the best ways to educate and engage children on these issues?

The Perfect Graduation Gift: A Coat for All Seasons!

What is the one gift that can help your kids to succeed? The best part about it --- it's free!

The Surprising News about Children's Mental Health

How mentally healthy are today’s children and teens? A comprehensive new survey shows that the current generation of young people are in better shape than we’ve realized. However, trends in medication use continue to draw concern by mental health experts.

The Psychology of Getting Back in the Batter’s Box

Want to learn about building resilience? Developing team values? Developing a positive identity? Little League baseball has got all of this and more.

The Digital Revolution & the Nature of Adolescent Passage

The very essence of communication has changed. The various social media, 24/7 news cycles and the ubiquitous presence of smart phones keep us connected whether we want to participate or not. As families have become more comfortable with allowing their children to have cell phones, there seems to be an evolution in the nature of the dynamics of child development.

What Is Separation Anxiety?

Some kids beyond their toddler years have a terrible time separating from parents. They may refuse to sleep alone, go on play dates, or attend school. Any attempts at separation may trigger intense fear and tantrums. This situation can be a nightmare for parents. The good news is with early identification and professional guidance treatment is usually very successful.

How do Bilingual Infants Separate their Languages?

Infants who acquire two or more languages from birth have to distinguish and differentiate the spoken input they receive into distinct languages. Professor Janet Werker who has been at the forefront of research on this topic tells us how they do it.

Mathematics Fluency Training - It Works!

By Michael Hogan Ph.D on May 12, 2015 in In One Lifespan
Numeracy – our everyday play with numbers – is essential to the rhythm of life and our adaptive success as a species. There is a wonderful beauty in numbers that infants and toddlers intuitively appreciate as those around them play with numbers in song, story, dance, and life drama. But why is it that we so often hear an emerging negative attitude in relation to maths?

Can God Be Its Own Cause?

Many humans find First Cause arguments for the existence of God compelling. Why? There are two collaborating reasons: Our confusion over infinity, and our lack of confusion over the strange notion of being self-caused -- a property often attributed to God. Both of these implicate our amazing and puzzling ability to conceive.

Adolescence and Goal Avoidance

The closer to reaching a valued growth goal an adolescent gets, often the more ambivalent and resistant they can become.

Tics Are for Kids

By Susan Scheftel Ph.D. on May 09, 2015 in Evolving Minds
Tics are common in childhood but can seem mysterious and strange. In fact at least 15% of all children will develop tics during the elementary school years. Understanding what tics are, as well as what they are not, may quell parental anxieties and also relieve a child who has developed them.

The Wrong Way to Get People to Do the Right Thing

By Alfie Kohn on May 07, 2015 in The Homework Myth
It may seem a matter of hard-headed realism to emphasize "enlightened self-interest" (rather than altruism) in our efforts to promote individual acts of caring or to justify spending public funds to address infant mortality or spousal abuse. But this approach, just like rewarding children when they do nice things, is counterproductive over the long haul.

The Importance of Being Wanted

By Robert J King Ph.D. on May 07, 2015 in Hive Mind
Are the children of gay and lesbian parents likely to suffer adverse outcomes?

Split Decisions

In When Parents Part, psychologist Penelope Leach provides sound practical advice to parents about managing changes that she claims may be good for one or both of them, but "will certainly be bad for their children." In making her case, Leach may not adequately assess differences due to social class, pre-separation experiences and the resilience of children.

When a Parent Is Incarcerated

A two-step process developed by Dr. Glen Palm may help children cope with their parents' incarceration.

ADHD Kills

There was a two fold increase in death rates for those with ADHD.

The Gift of Positive Psychology: Empower Teachers

How do we express our gratitude to our favorite teachers? Empower them.

Imagining an Authentic Life

Stop trying to be true to yourself, because there's no self to be true to. You are a character in a fiction of your own making, constantly revising your narrative to adapt to your circumstances. If you don't like your life, change your story.

Adolescence and Honoring Agreements

Keeping agreements is a teenage habit worth the parental effort to teach.

Finding Meaning Through Mental Time Travel

Imagine returning to the home where you grew up, opening the door, and walking right back into your childhood or youth? What would you learn about yourself and your life story? How would you live your life differently today?

One More Reason to Unplug Before Bedtime

How does being "plugged in" to an electronic device impact a young child's developing brain?

10 Ways to Stay Connected with Your Adolescent

There are affirmative actions parents can take to stay meaningfully and satisfyingly connected to their teenager as the process of adolescence grows them apart, as it is meant to do.

The Grass Moment

By Alfie Kohn on April 24, 2015 in The Homework Myth
If we want to raise kids who aren't self-centered, we should stop emphasizing compliance and instead foster a willingness to question authority

Why Writing by Hand Could Change Your Life

By Temma Ehrenfeld on April 23, 2015 in Open Gently
Remember pens and paper? They help us think.

Do the “Eyes” Have It?

When we have our face in our phone how do we listen to someone next to us?

Why I Can't..... or Why Can't I?

Our beliefs and thoughts impact our lives more than any relationship.It would be wise to evaluate how we came to them and whether they truly serve us.

Developmental Dislike of Parents During Early Adolescence

One function of adolescence is to grow parent and adolescent apart. Dislike of parents is part of what allows this social separation to occur. Most important for parents to remember is that this loss of liking for parents does not mean any lessening of of adolescent love.

"Burn Book": An App for Bullying

For those over 30, or without teenage children, the term “Burn Book” may have no meaning. 0thers will recognize it as the iconic Treasury of Nastiness from the movie Mean Girls. Now it has become an app—one that enables anonymous bullying in specific, selected communities:

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

All of us encounter experiences in life when we may be temporally overwhelmed by a negative emotion, be it anger, pressure, nervousness, despair, or confusion. In these situations, how we choose to “master the moment” can make the difference between proactive versus reactive, and confidence versus insecurity. Here are ten ways to be less reactive in difficult situations...

Is Birth Order a Myth?

Most people believe that birth order shapes our personalities and has impact on the careers we choose, and the ways we behave. Is this real, or merely an illusion? What do we really know about birth order effects?