Essential Reads

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Parents must prepare adolescents for both offline and online life

Baby Crying? Don't Shame the Parents!

What all adults need to know about letting babies "cry it out"

The Archeology of Misbehavior

Children feel loss as a disorienting blast.

I May Be a Jackass, But I Can Be Taught to Care

You can lead a kid to water, but can you make him drink?

Recent Posts on Child Development

Positive Psychology of Mindfulness

When students call out "Present', make sure they know what it means. So what does "Present" really mean? It does not just mean "here" - it means here in the moment and mindfully in touch with the learning.

Inside Out Movie Focuses on the Importance of Emotions

By Kate Roberts Ph.D. on July 27, 2015 in Savvy Parenting
Disney's Pixar Inside Out movie teaches through entertainment, the importance of processing and understanding a child's emotions.

A Second Look at Helicopter Parenting

By Kyle D. Pruett M.D. on July 27, 2015 in Once Upon a Child
When I first heard the term ‘helicopter parenting’ some 30 years ago, I thought ‘hmm- clever, but ouch’, and filed it under ‘probably not helpful’ in my memory.

I Hate Multiple Choice

What do multiple choice tests measure? Is that what we want to know?

Adolescence and the Allure of the Internet

Today's parents must raise children in two worlds, offline and online, and for adolescents freedom on the Internet has a powerful allure.

Summer Camp and Disruptive Moments

By Steve Baskin on July 26, 2015 in S'mores and More
Former summer campers often describe their experiences as "life changing", despite the fact that they spend far less time at camp than home or school. This article discusses one reason that camps have a disproportionate impact on the children they serve.

Puns and the Aging Process

By Richard Smith Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Joy and Pain
The question of what makes a good pun depends on the age of the punster and the expectations associated with age. There is lesson in this for all inveterate punsters as they "mature."

Baby Crying? Don't Shame the Parents!

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on July 26, 2015 in Moral Landscapes
A medical doctor, also a parent, wrote to me recently to complain about my blog post, "'Dangers of Crying it Out.'" Here is (most of) my response.

The Archeology of Misbehavior

Archeology is the study of human activity in the past. The archeology of misbehavior is studying current behavior to uncover hidden sources. The “ruins” of misdeeds are built upon personality architecture and cultural landscapes.

47 Reasons Why It's Really, Really Good to Be an Aunt

By Melanie Notkin on July 24, 2015 in Savvy Auntie
Every aunt knows how fortunate we are to have the love of our nieces and nephews. And we are grateful to their parents, who have given us the gift of aunthood. And so, Auntie's Day is also a time for us to appreciate all really good things that aunthood brings...

Stories of Seclusion: A Child Who Couldn't Resist the Swamp

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on July 24, 2015 in How To Do Life
Hasn't every child wondered what it woulld be like to leave home for the wilds?

I May Be a Jackass, But I Can Be Taught to Care

A jackass is an ornery animal. You can lead it to water, but you can't make it drink. Are kids the same way?

Finding My Daughter Again Through the Outdoors

I think much parenting anxiety centers around how the kids will turn out and whether the choices you made will impact them in good ways or not so good ways. You wonder how you’ll feel about them as people, too, whether you’ll like who they become as adults. You know you’ll love them, but will you like them?

Can Oxytocin Fortify Resilience Against Childhood Adversity?

A new study from Emory University reports that manipulating the oxytocin system has the potential to fortify a person's resilience against childhood adversity, abuse, or neglect.

Spanking Makes Kids More Aggressive

By Temma Ehrenfeld on July 22, 2015 in Open Gently
Monkey see, monkey do. Kids who are spanked are more likely to hit.

7 Key Signs of a Lying Child or Teenager

Psychologist Adrian Furnham identified a variety of ways to detect whether an individual may be dishonest. We can apply some of the tips to communication situations with young persons. Here are seven ways to tell if a child or teenager might be lying to you...

Why Can Domestic Violence Get Passed From Parent to Child?

It can be hard to understand why a child who is exposed to domestic violence might go on to experience violence in later adult relationships.

Who Makes a Qualified Children’s Media Researcher?

By Jamie Krenn Ph.D. on July 21, 2015 in Screen Time
Thoughts related to research training within the field of children's media.

Childhood Poverty Has Detrimental Impacts on Brain Structure

Evidence continues to mount that there is a link between growing up in a low-income household, brain development, and lower academic achievement. The majority of children attending public schools in the United States come from low-income households. We have a crisis on our hands. In this blog post, I summarize the findings of a wide range of recent studies on this topic.

Is Your Childhood Wrecking Your Love Life?

By Peg Streep on July 21, 2015 in Tech Support
One of the legacies of childhood is how well or badly we connect to others, both in friendship as well as intimate settings. How your childhood experiences may shape your ability to love and be loved today, and how to understand and recognize patterns of insecure attachment.

Why "Making Learning Fun" Fails

What happens if we teach children that learning is supposed to be fun?

Finding a Secure Base and Rewiring Your Personality

One way to change your insecure attachment style to that of having an “earned” secure style is to find and nurture your own secure base in adulthood. Learn what to look for and how to create for yourself the experiences that naturally instill mental health and well-being. It is never too late to rewire your personality in a way that works better for you and leads to more h

How to Respond to Your "Mouthy" Child

By Tamar Chansky Ph.D on July 20, 2015 in Worry Wise
One of the best ways to teach your child about flexibility is by demonstrating your own. This is what the fine art of diplomacy really sounds like. Because in the end, if you sound like a brat while correcting your child from sounding like a brat, well, Houston, we've got problems.

Can You Read a Language You Can’t Hear?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on July 20, 2015 in Talking Apes
Deaf learners face considerable obstacles to reading, but they also bring a unique skill set to the task.

Attempting to Provide Care for Vulnerable Children

In a major study of children aged two to fourteen years in foster care, only 25% of children with severe behavioral needs received any services at all.

A Checklist To Stop Misuse Of Psychiatric Medication In Kids

By Allen J Frances M.D. on July 19, 2015 in DSM5 in Distress
The exponential growth in the use of psycho-stimulants, anti-depressants, and anti-psychotic drugs often harms children more than helps them. This Checklist to help clinicians think through the necessary steps before prescribing medicines.

7 Keys to Handling Difficult Teenagers

It’s not easy when you have to deal with difficult teenagers in your life, whether they are your children, students, athletes, group members, or employees. What can you do in the face of a challenging adolescent? Here are seven keys to successfully handle difficult teenagers...

New developments in sleep and development

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on July 18, 2015 in Dream Catcher
in order to understand functions of sleep we need to study the ways in which it develops in the child

Stuck in Mute: How Do You Cope?

Why do words fail some of us most of the time?

How Troubled Kids are like Tornadoes

A book about tornado science mirrors concerns with juveniles for whom pressure can explode into utter destruction.