Essential Reads

Biological Foundations for Self-Directed Education

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on September 28, 2016 in Freedom to Learn
Self-directed education—as it occurs in unschooling families and at democratic schools--operates by allowing these four natural drives to flourish. ....

How An Art Break Helps Kids Learn

By Darby Saxbe Ph.D. on September 27, 2016 in Home Base
Integrating play and creativity into the school day may help children learn. Here's an innovative school counseling program that did just that.

The Bonus Effect

By Alfie Kohn on September 27, 2016 in The Homework Myth
If you're told "Do this, and you'll get that," you're likely to become less interested in "this" -- and more interested in "that." Especially if "that" turns out to be money.

Will Your Gamer Survive College?

By Victoria L. Dunckley M.D. on September 26, 2016 in Mental Wealth
If you're concerned about your son's video game habits spinning out of control when he goes to college, you're right to be worried—but here's what parents can do.

More Posts on Child Development

A Pioneer in Child Sleep Research and Treatment

A Pioneer in Child Sleep Research and Practice
Pixabay/CCO Public Domain/Permission to Use

What Is Healthy Narcissism?

What is Healthy Narcissism? The joy of self-love can be powerful and sustaining.
www.cnn.com

Divorce Pitfalls to Avoid, Part Two

During divorce parents confront numerous dilemmas that damage relationships with their children. By avoiding divorce pitfalls, you will enhance the relationships with you children

The Importance of Family Dinnertime: Part Two

By Robyn Fivush Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in The Stories of Our Lives
Stories emerge naturally around the dinner table. Here are a few tips to maximize their impact on your children.

"Daddy, Can I Die and Make the Pain Stop?"

By Kevin D. Arnold Ph.D., ABPP on September 22, 2016 in The Older Dad
Some young children think about suicide, but adults often never hear the cry for help.

My Easygoing Kid Is Stressing Me Out!

If you are a Type A parent, raising a Type B tween can be rigorous. A part of you probably admires your low-key kid, even though his laid back attitude can at times make you crazy.

How Vision Problems and Celiac Disease Masquerade as ADHD

By Marilyn Wedge Ph.D. on September 21, 2016 in Suffer the Children
Celiac disease or gluten intolerance can also affect a child's ability to think clearly and focus at school.

The Blank Slate Controversy

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on September 21, 2016 in The Human Beast
Behaviorists used to argue that people were blank slates in the sense that almost all of our behavior was learned. Evolutionary psychologists disagree. Who is correct?

An Insecure Childhood Affects How You Deal With Adult Stress

By Douglas LaBier Ph.D. on September 21, 2016 in The New Resilience
If you experienced insecurity in your relationship with your parents, you're likely to have difficulty when faced with stressful decisions or situations.

A Simple Way to Keep Your Kids Off Drugs

By Temma Ehrenfeld on September 21, 2016 in Open Gently
Better sleep for pre-teens is tied to less drinking and pot smoking through their 20s.

Does an Abusive Upbringing Damage the Brain?

There are well-known associations between abuse or neglect early in life and later psychological or psychiatric complications. What do we know about what goes on in the brain?

Storytelling Is a Conduit for Intergenerational Learning

Have you shared a well-told story with a teen or grandchild lately? The result could be transformative for both of you!

Divorce Pitfalls to Avoid, Part One

Divorce imposes challenges, reshuffling relationships between child and parents. Avoiding these divorce pitfalls will enhance your relationships for your child beyond the family.

Adverse Features Contribute to Abuse in Polyamory

Isolation, charismatic leaders, and groupthink could facilitate abuse in polyamorous families.

That Sneaky Devil, Projective Identification

By Nick Luxmoore on September 17, 2016 in Young People Up Close
In relationships, we need to stop and wonder whether the things we feel belong to us or are unconsciously projected into us by other people.

What Teachers Need to Know About Their Students' Brains

By Eric Haseltine Ph.D. on September 17, 2016 in Long Fuse, Big Bang
Hot-off-the-press research suggests a radically new way to teach

Playing Dead:

By Kirby Farrell Ph.D. on September 16, 2016 in A Swim in Denial
Preschoolers' development lags when they're overprotected.

Enough Is Enough Series Part 5: ADHD Is Exposed

By Robert Berezin M.D. on September 16, 2016 in The Theater of the Brain
Children must be raised with boundaries and love. To provide the best holding environment for our children has to be our parental imperative. Regarding ADHD, we have lost our way.

Childhood Sexual Abuse: Sexual Recovery Is Possible

By Michael Castleman M.A. on September 15, 2016 in All About Sex
Myth: childhood sexual abuse is so traumatic that it ruins women for life. Truth: recovery is possible, and survivors can create deep, satisfying sexual relationships.

5 Brain-Based Reasons to Teach Handwriting in School

Did you know that handwriting will make you and your child smarter than keyboarding?

When Does the Bullying Stop?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on September 15, 2016 in Media Spotlight
What are the long-term consequences of being bullied as a child? being a victim can be more far-reaching than you might think.

Birth Is Just One Day, Parenting Lasts a Lifetime

By Darby Saxbe Ph.D. on September 15, 2016 in Home Base
Most prenatal classes focus on preparing for birth - but ignore what happens after the baby comes. Without postpartum prep, the transition to parenthood can be rocky.

When "Helicopter Parents" Land at Their Kids' Jobs

By Victor Lipman on September 15, 2016 in Mind of the Manager
"Mind if I Skype in to my son's interview?" A recent survey shows that "helicopter parents" are now showing up at their kids' workplace.

Can Thumb Sucking Be Addictive?

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on September 15, 2016 in In Excess
Thumb sucking is a common behavior in young children but a small minority carry on the behavior into their adulthood. Is this problematic and could it be described as addictive?

Is Extreme Childhood Obesity 'Nutritional Neglect'?

By Sylvia R. Karasu M.D. on September 14, 2016 in The Gravity of Weight
By the latest statistics, about 17% of children and adolescents in the U.S. are obese and of these almost 6% are extremely obese. To what extent should parents be held accountable?

What Do Brexit and Universal Grammar Have in Common?

By Vyv Evans Ph.D. on September 14, 2016 in Language in the Mind
Why are languages broadly similar? The Universal Grammar hypothesis meets Brexit: both are presently intangible.

Can Confiding in Your Dog Improve Your Mental Health?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on September 14, 2016 in Canine Corner
New data shows that people confide in their dog during times of adversity, but only about certain specific emotions

#BecauseofArtsEd: Arts Education and Me

By Kimberly Sena Moore Ph.D. on September 14, 2016 in Your Musical Self
This week is National Arts in Education week. How did arts education impact you?

How Mindful Sports Parenting Helps Children Excel

A new book on how to stop micromanaging your children offers a counterintuitive strategy for success.

The One Thing We All Should Do to Become Better Parents

By Lisa Firestone Ph.D. on September 12, 2016 in Compassion Matters
Attachment research shows us that the very best thing we can do for our kids, whether they’re already born or arriving in the future, is to make sense of our own story.