Body Language Essential Reads

How Do We Read Emotions in Robots?

In time of need, will you let a robot help you? A new study examines this.

The Most Important Communication Skill You Will Ever Need

Our social lives are heavily influenced by the nature of the conversations we hold. New communications research shows how to make your conversations work for you.

What's In a Face?

Human faces exhibit more diversity than any other physical feature and more than other species. This fact tells us of the social evolution of our ancestors.
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Mimicry and Attraction in Romantic Relationships

Can simply copying the words and behaviors of a date or mate make them like you more? Find out what research has to say about how mimicry can help your love life…

Boost Your Sex Appeal in Four Extraordinary Ways

Ordinarily, to boost your sex appeal you alter your physical appearance, but try these extraordinary strategies, no physical alterations required!

Spying the Spy: 50 Must-Ask Questions to Ask a Suspected Spy

By Joe Navarro M.A. on May 31, 2017 in Spycatcher
With all the inquiries about foreign intelligence and the Russians, here are the questions I would ask as a former counterintelligence agent.

Three Keys to Getting Along

By Joe Navarro M.A. on May 15, 2017 in Spycatcher
The Three A's of Making Friends and Getting Along.

8 Ways Your Body Speaks Way Louder Than Your Words

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on April 11, 2017 in Feeling It
We all face difficult conversations with our spouse, our boss, our employee, our friends. We get so caught up in our words we forget the most important part: our body language.

What Is the Importance of Nonverbal Communications?

By Joe Navarro M.A. on April 05, 2017 in Spycatcher
Why study nonverbals? Because as you will see, they matter more than we think.

Are You a Social Chameleon or a Zebra?

What kind of person are you? A social chameleon or a zebra?

iSpeakDog: A Website Devoted to Becoming Dog Literate

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 27, 2017 in Animal Emotions
This new website teaches people how to understand their dog's behavior and is meant for dog guardians, trainers, groomers, veterinarians, and anyone else who interacts with dogs.

Does Your Body Language Give You Away?

It’s widely known that your body language provides a window into your thoughts. Control that language, with guidance from this new research, to improve your relationships.

Is ‘Gaydar’ Really a Thing?

By David Ludden Ph.D. on January 16, 2017 in Talking Apes
People can be surprisingly accurate at judging others’ sexual orientation from nonverbal cues, but only because ‘gaydar’ works just like other social intuitions.

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Touching

Touching brings our earliest and most basic connection to another person.

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on November 24, 2016 in Canine Corner
The dog's tail is not simply a signal flag conveying his mood. It has some other important purposes.

Do We Interpret Dog and Human Emotions in the Same Way?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on November 17, 2016 in Canine Corner
Recent data answers the question of whether the brain processes emotional expressions of humans and dogs in the same way.

5 Ways Our Body Language Speaks Loud and Clear

We constantly send out signals through our nonverbal communication, often without realizing it. A new study shows how these can impact our success at work.

What Eye Contact Can Do to You

Eye contact has the power to alter our behavior, attention, memory, and appraisal of who's looking at us. Is that always a good thing?

A Match Made in America: Who Will Dominate the First Debate?

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on September 20, 2016 in Why Bad Looks Good
Research shows that Trump and Clinton will be judged by what they say, and how they behave when their opponent has the floor—because viewers are voters.

Fidgeting Has Benefits

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on September 17, 2016 in Cravings
Do you tap your fingers, shift your feet, squirm in your seat, and just generally have trouble staying still? That could be good news!

How To Minimize Drama

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on September 16, 2016 in Ambigamy
Drama is a drag on any relationship, but what is it and how does it arise? Here's a roadmap with the pitfalls marked so you can avoid them.

Why Do We Wince When We're in Pain?

By Nathan H. Lents, Ph.D. on September 12, 2016 in Beastly Behavior
The recent discovery that all mammals make the same pain-face begs the question, why? One reason could be that wincing is a facial expression intended to communicate danger.

How Eye Contact Brings You Together (or Pulls You Apart)

Science explains why making eye contact can be a friendly social signal or challenge another person.

Study: The Male Warrior Hypothesis May Be Real

By Christopher Bergland on August 05, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Why are male athletes more likely to be touchy-feely after a sports competition than their female counterparts? A new study from Harvard University offers some interesting clues.
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10 Fleeting Behaviors That Reveal So Much

By Joe Navarro M.A. on July 31, 2016 in Spycatcher
Sometimes the most fleeting ephemeral behaviors are the ones that reveal what is really in the heart and the mind.

How People Perceive Dogs With Docked Tails and Cropped Ears

New data shows that seeing a dog with a docked tail and cropped ears may cause people to believe that the dog is aggressive and its owner might be aggressive as well.

How a Cultural Meme Was Born

New insights into the origin of language as a mandrill in an English zoo invents a gesture for "leave me alone," and it spreads through the community

Want to Up Your Game? Visual Guidance Optimizes Motor Skills

A new visually guided coaching method improves both gaze patterns and the acquisition of complex motor skills.

10 Ways to Know That It's Time to Go

Sometimes it's hard know when it’s time to leave. These 10 tips will help you figure out the best way to make an exit.

Babies' Brains May Process Social Thinking Via Motor Systems

A new study published today reports (for the first time) that motor systems in the brain may drive infants' earliest social learning, thinking, and behavior.