Essential Reads

Pride in Mental Health: Advocacy

An interview with Jillian Weiss of Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund, and Calvin Stowell of DoSomething.org.

The Badass Personalities of People Who Like Being Alone

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on June 21, 2017 in Living Single
What are the personality characteristics of people who like spending time alone? What about people who are unafraid to be single? Four studies offer an affirming profile.

Small Samples, Big Hopes

If you observe an event (datum) 3 standard deviations away from the theoretical prediction, do you do a significance test?

Study Shows a Bias for Evidence of What We Want to Be True

New experimental findings suggest that we seek and stress corroborating evidence based on what we desire.

More Posts on Bias

The Entire Truth of Dr. Mayim Bialik

“I hope that’s what young women and the people who love them will take away from this book—a full treatise on what it is to be female.”

What Millennials Learned About Bias From This Harvard Test

There's a lot we can all learn about the conscious and unconscious influencers of bias. Here's one way some people are becoming more aware.

Rats! Sometimes Psychiatrists Get It Wrong

Sometimes things are not what they appear to be in a locked psychiatric inpatient unit. This is a short story about a man who saw rats, and no one believed him.

Trumpcare: When Is Health Insurance Not Really Insurance?

Who benefits when people can't afford to seek out and use health care services and at what cost to our country, its economy, and our society?

Be Positive. Be Neutral. Which Is It?

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on May 05, 2017 in Ambigamy
Six practical tips for managing your loyalties and doubts, your positive certainty and your neutral receptivity, your open-mindedness and your closed-mindedness.
K. Ramsland

H. H. Holmes: Exhumations and Expectations

As we await the results of the high-profile exhumation of H. H. Holmes, we might not want this mystery solved.

When Hiring a Lawyer or Mediator, Buyer Beware

Who is responsible when the public fails to understand the different dispute resolution processes and types of attorneys and mediators available, even after they retain someone?

Confronting Singlism in the Psychology Classroom

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on May 02, 2017 in Living Single
Guest blogger Joan DelFattore finds that college students are more attuned to singlism now than in the past, but we all still have a lot to learn.

A Climate Scientist's Talk at the March for Science

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on May 02, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
A climate scientist speaks at the march for science in a way that acknowledges the limitations to science, and the value of skepticism and alternative views.

How to Think Our Way Out of a Nightmare Future

Think The Handmaid's Tale is a little too close to home? Maybe it's time we all took stock of these bad habits.

The Trump Effect, Part 2

Like the boost that bullying and racial and religious discrimination have experienced since Donald Trump announced his candidacy, so have sexual harassment and assault.

Why People Still “Feel Sorry” for Only Children

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on May 02, 2017 in Singletons
How many only-child stereotypes can you name?

Expression Leads to Oppression

Marco Rubio's #expressionNOToppression initiative inherently makes no sense.

Save Your Mixed Tears and Other Tips for Mixed Living

“Grappling with everything that comes with being mixed can be painful and feel conflicting, but one of your strongest allies in that journey is yourself.”

How Are False Beliefs Harming People?

How are yours and others' misguided biases, beliefs, assumptions, expectations, and values causing harm?

Mona Haydar Speaks Your Language

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 26, 2017 in Brick by Brick
Haydar is no ordinary artist, and the concept behind Haydar’s first single, “Hijabi,” is anything but common.

When Should You Go With Your Intuitions?

Do you trust your gut? Going with your intuitions can be dangerous in some situations. This article helps you see when you should go with your gut, and when you shouldn't.

"Us" and "Them"

By Jann Gumbiner Ph.D. on April 25, 2017 in The Teenage Mind
Many of the principles studied by social psychologists after WWII apply to our current political climate.

How Behavioral Science Can Help Truth Triumph Over Lies

Worried about deceptive political coverage by the media? This article shows how you can take steps to fix this problem!

Is Willful Ignorance a Good Quality in an Attorney?

Why do family law attorneys ignore the research which supports the benefits of a facilitative over an adversarial approach for divorce and family law?

Why I am Marching in the March for Science

By Lee Jussim Ph.D. on April 17, 2017 in Rabble Rouser
Two reasons to march in The March for Science.

Injustice at the Hands of Judges and Justices

Judicial bias is a variable that is often overlooked, despite the fact that it leads to injustice.
National Center for Education Statistics/U.S. Department of Education. Retrieve from https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cnb.asp

Why Do Students of Color Feel Like an Imposter in School?

Do students of color have perceptions of intelligence? Some thoughts on feeling like an imposter

Positive Heuristics

Researchers are looking at heuristics the wrong way — as sources of bias and error. In fact, they are powerful strategies for making inferences under uncertainty and ambiguity.

The Real Truth About Your Weight and Health

By Alexis Conason Psy.D. on April 08, 2017 in Eating Mindfully
New research suggests that it could be weight-stigma--not our actual weight--that leads to poor health.

Empathy and the Jury Selection Process

If "equal justice under law" means what it says, then judges and jurors hearing cases must have evenly distributed empathy.

Working While Black

By Sam Louie MA, LMHC on April 06, 2017 in Minority Report
We've heard of African-Americans being racially targeted while driving, a.k.a. "driving while black," but few are aware of another kind of bias.

The Psychology of Job Interviews

By The Book Brigade on April 06, 2017 in The Author Speaks
The vaunted—and often stressful—job interview can be a far more useful tool for finding the right employment fit.

How Much Easier Is Life for Good-Looking People?

By Ray Williams on April 05, 2017 in Wired for Success
There’s substantial evidence to indicate we make judgments about people based on their physical attractiveness, which affect relationships, job selection and success.

How to Quickly Become More Persuasive

Are you having trouble grabbing people's attention—even for ideas you KNOW would benefit them? Here's the likely reason—and how to change it.