Bias Essential Reads

Why We Think We Are Invincible

By Jen Kim on June 26, 2017 in Valley Girl With a Brain
Why do people knowingly put themselves in dangerous situations? Science has an answer.

Can Our Anger Be Explained by Global Brain Vulnerabilities?

Is it possible that our angry world reflects changing anger thresholds in our brains?

Pride in Mental Health: Advocacy

An interview with Jillian Weiss of Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund, and Calvin Stowell of DoSomething.org.

The Badass Personalities of People Who Like Being Alone

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on June 21, 2017 in Living Single
What are the personality characteristics of people who like spending time alone? What about people who are unafraid to be single? Four studies offer an affirming profile.

Small Samples, Big Hopes

If you observe an event (datum) 3 standard deviations away from the theoretical prediction, do you do a significance test?

Study Shows a Bias for Evidence of What We Want to Be True

New experimental findings suggest that we seek and stress corroborating evidence based on what we desire.

Does It Really Matter How We Talk About Addiction?

Sticks & stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me. When talking about addiction, the truth of this age old adage rings empty. In this article, find out why.

Denmark Declassifies Transgender as Mental Illness

Transgender is not considered to be a mental illness in Denmark, making it the first country to remove the link between transgender identity and mental illness.
Public domain

The Healing Power of Placebos: Fact or Fiction?

By Joe Pierre M.D. on May 25, 2017 in Psych Unseen
Does new research really prove that placebos don't require deception?

Are Dogs Self-Aware?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on May 24, 2017 in The Human Beast
The standard test of self-awareness is being able to recognize ourselves in a mirror. Although chimpanzees pass this test with flying colors, dogs flunk.

Gutsy Third Person Self-Talk Utilizes Your Vagus Nerve

Excessive first person "self-talk" can increase egocentric bias. That said, using "non-first-person" pronouns and your own name has been found to promote healthy self-distancing.

First Responders and Mental Health

We must not delay responding to our first responders.

13 Things You Never Knew About College Admissions

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on April 28, 2017 in Living Single
Evidence-based answers to some of the thorniest questions about fairness in college admissions.

A Fool and His or Her Money, Psychologically Speaking

Three cognitive biases that can lead to unwise financial decisions.

Of March and Myth: The Politicizing of Science

What differentiates science from other disciplines is a focus on testing of hypotheses. Is science now struggling with a 'crisis of confidence'? Is a March for Science the answer?

Why Hitler Did Not Use Chemical Weapons on the Battlefield

By Gordon Hodson Ph.D. on April 18, 2017 in Without Prejudice
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer recently stated (incorrectly) that Hitler did not use chemical weapons on his own people. How can psychology inform this discussion?

Why Do Millennials Get a Bad Rap?

Maybe it is just a failure of generativity.

The Brain's Fixation on the Short Term Is Hurting Politics

By David B. Feldman Ph.D. on April 11, 2017 in Supersurvivors
When the Senate used the nuclear option, changing how it confirms Supreme Court nominees, some who voted for it said it was a bad idea. A cognitive bias explains why they did it.

The Most Powerful Way to Learn is Not What You Think

Before attempting to learn something new to keep yourself marketable in a changing environment, try these three approaches to "unlearning."

On Race and the Internet

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on March 30, 2017 in Media Spotlight
While the Internet has long been seen as the last bastion of free speech where anyone could post comments without fear, the dark side of this freedom is also apparent

Addiction and Self-Deception

Why do addicts hold on to false beliefs about their use?

Could a Blood Test for Cancer Be Dangerous?

Early cancer detection seems right. But it can, in reality, be wrong.
Dawn Henderson

Race-Related Trauma in the Public Education System

Are we missing an important dimension of trauma?

Gender Differences: Equality Versus Similarity

Some feminists deny that true gender differences in behavior exist: they mistake similarity with equality, and neglect an important source of individuality.

Prestige, Power, and Placebos

Intuitive errors and social pressures often fool us into the wrong decisions. But our social minds also possess untapped healing power. Recent research shows us how to use it!

We're Wired to Take the Path of Least Resistance

By Caroline Beaton on March 11, 2017 in The Gen-Y Guide
A recently-published study discovered something we knew but denied: we're wired to take the path of least resistance.

Body, Soul, Survival

On the history and politics of health care in the United States.

The Future of Diversity Training

By Katerina Bezrukova Ph.D. on March 07, 2017 in Team Spirit
“I don’t like the racism and the name calling” said George W. Bush about the current political environment. What is the future of diversity training in today’s contentious climate?

Being Right vs. Feeling Right

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on March 02, 2017 in Ambigamy
Feelings feel more factual than fact, more real than reality, truer than truth. The truth can be staring us in the face, and we’re still more likely to believe our guts.

Discrimination and Psychological Distress

By Shervin Assari MD MPH on February 28, 2017 in Unequal Vulnerability
When it comes to discrimination, men seem to be more vulnerable.