Essential Reads

7 New Books to Read This Fall

The best new titles on psychology

Will Americans Eat Fewer Subway Sandwiches Because of Jared?

Despite negative publicity, effects on customers are likely to be short-lived.

Do Shoppers Benefit From Buying With Subscriptions?

Subscriptions are very popular but have many downsides for shoppers

What Shoppers Should Know About Charm Prices

Prices that end in “9" are common and influence buying behavior

Recent Posts on Behavioral Economics

Psychology of Money

Are you sure you want to spend your money on THAT? Dan Ariely wants you to wait and think. Same for having children.

Tom Brady Broke the Rules, But Don't We All?

By Mark Travers Ph.D. on May 14, 2015 in Social Instincts
Before we tie Tom Brady to the whipping post, perhaps we should think about the times we bent, finessed, or massaged the rules for our own benefit.

How to Organize Your Financial Life

Tax time is over and you swear it won’t be like this again.

The Hidden Price of Progress

By Nick Tasler on May 11, 2015 in Strategic Thinking
Last month's protests in Baltimore reveal surprising paradox in the psychology of change.

Going ape in the office

High ranking chimpanzees will actively seek to drive apart coalitions between subordinate group members. Surprisingly, this ancient tactic is used by many bosses today to prevent talented coworkers from usurping their position, despite negatively impacting performance. A recent study investigates why some individuals are driven to divide and conquer.

Fixing Corruption

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on May 10, 2015 in Hidden Motives
Recently, The Economist looking into the effort of containing bribery, noted that “the cost and complexity of investigations are spiraling beyond what is reasonable. What can be done about it?

On The Nature of True Love

We care about another’s wellbeing simply because the act of loving is enjoyable.

What Your Hair Really Says About You

Many of us spend an inordinate amount of time, money, and worry about the state of our hair. Chances are you feel that something’s amiss if your locks are misbehaving on any given day. You may feel better knowing that you’re not alone in this preoccupation, especially if your concerns about aging enter into the picture.

Emotional Ideologies

By Eyal Winter on May 08, 2015 in Feeling Smart
We vote out of passion and not out of reasoning

You're NOT Being Irrational!

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on May 07, 2015 in Ambigamy
Rational means comparing, using ratios. We all do that, but sometimes we compare to the wrong things.

The Wrong Way to Get People to Do the Right Thing

By Alfie Kohn on May 07, 2015 in The Homework Myth
It may seem a matter of hard-headed realism to emphasize "enlightened self-interest" (rather than altruism) in our efforts to promote individual acts of caring or to justify spending public funds to address infant mortality or spousal abuse. But this approach, just like rewarding children when they do nice things, is counterproductive over the long haul.

What Your Dog Wants

Living with a pet provides humans with many physical and psychological benefits. Research shows that the health and well-being of pet owners is greater than that of non-pet-owners. But what about our pets? Sure, we buy them treats and care for them. But do they get deeper, more important rewards from their human relationships? And how might this come about?

Why Not Tax the Rich?

By Ken Eisold Ph.D. on May 02, 2015 in Hidden Motives
Strangely, the poor themselves end up protecting the rich

Announcement: A Crash Course on Gender Differences

By Eyal Winter on May 01, 2015 in Feeling Smart
Is she so different than him?

Wisdom From a Psychopath?

Research by Dr. Kevin Dutton shows that psychopathic traits may be appealing to individuals, but are harmful for communities.

No Time For Figuring Out Your Money?

By Michael F. Kay on April 30, 2015 in Financial Life Focus
Life is busy and maybe even overwhelming at times. Work, family, friends, hitting the gym, scheduling, and taxi service for your kids—it's a lot. Finding time to dig into the meat of your finances can be a battle you ignore at your peril.

Introduction to Investing in Healthy Minds

True or False: As a society we should be investing more in the mental health of young people. I’m guessing you answered “true.” But can you prove it?

The Surprising Psychology of Rock-Paper-Scissors

Don't be the one who has to wash the dishes, do push-ups, or pay for lunch. Winning at Rock - Paper - Scissors is about psychology, not chance.

What Is Confirmation Bias?

People are prone to believe what they want to believe.

Are Women Better Managers Than Men?

By Victor Lipman on April 23, 2015 in Mind of the Manager
A new Gallup study says so.

Moving Toward Collaboration: Lessons From the Field

It’s never failed to happen that people wake up and take note when I mention the basic set of questions the answer to which comprises a decision-making system: Who makes which decisions? Who provides input? Who hears about it? How and when are the decisions made?

Wishful Thinking

By Eyal Winter on April 22, 2015 in Feeling Smart
How we can ignore facts we don't like.

What Can We Learn From Reading Online Reviews?

By Gregory R. Maio Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in Attitude Check
To write a review or not to write a review (and simply use stars)

How You Can Tell That It's the Right Time to Quit

Giving up frustrating goals creates opportunities.

The Art and Science of Haggling

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 18, 2015 in A Sideways View
Often the most popular skills based courses are those on negotiation. They teach among other things the gentle but very important arts of haggling and persuasion: in short how to get a good deal. Why is it so important and what is the fundamental psychology of haggling?

What Makes Us Tick?

They met in a airport because of a book that one of them was reading, the same the other had recently read. The conversation was so stimulating that they decided to continue it online and share it with their readers. They both believe this will be the first of an endless series of talks about the subject—what makes people tick—that tickles them the most.

The Death of Mr. Economicus

By Thomas Hills Ph.D. on April 16, 2015 in Statistical Life
For many years, we thought humans were rational. Homo economicus was the protagonist of the human story, and he knew what he was about. He was the James Bond of decision making, and he didn't let the universe push him around. The only problem was that he didn't exist.

Show Me The Money!

By Renee Garfinkel Ph.D. on April 12, 2015 in Time Out
I love money. I love everything about it. I bought some pretty good stuff. Got me a $300 pair of socks. Got a fur sink. An electric dog polisher. A gasoline powered turtleneck sweater. And, of course, I bought some dumb stuff, too. –Steve Martin

The Best Bosses Aren't Bossy

By Victor Lipman on April 10, 2015 in Mind of the Manager
Overmanaging is one of the least discussed but most prevalent problems of management. Too much management—often a.k.a. bossiness—is the enemy of productivity.

Can There Be Too Much Romantic Sensitivity?

Sensitivity is often praised as one of the most important pillars of a good romantic relationship. Although this is indeed the case, too much romantic sensitivity can overburden a relationship. How then can we find the optimal balance of sensitivity in the complex romantic realm?