Behavioral Economics Essential Reads

Sex, Power, and Risk

By Joye Swan Ph.D. on October 22, 2016 in Up Close and Personal
When it comes to power in sexual relationships, who really controls what goes on in the bedroom?

Man's Fate

By Allen J Frances M.D. on October 18, 2016 in Saving Normal
Easter Island tells us all we need to know about our greatness and our fallibility- and also about our prognosis as a species.

What Great Parents Do: Are You Doing It?

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on October 14, 2016 in Singletons
75 Bite-size chunks of sensible strategies for raising children. How many do you use?

Can We Trust the Decision Researchers?

By Gary Klein Ph.D. on October 10, 2016 in Seeing What Others Don't
The Heuristics and Biases (HB) movement has had a tremendous influence and has generated the field of Behavioral Economics. However, the HB community has its own set of biases.

The Cobra Effect: Good Intentions, Perverse Outcomes

The law of unintended consequences has not been repealed. Wells Fargo is the latest high-profile victim of the cobra effect.

A Fundamental Source of Error in Human Judgment

By Gary Smith Ph.D. on October 07, 2016 in What the Luck?
We encounter it almost every day, yet almost nobody understands it.

2084: Digital Choice Curation for a Non-Orwellian Economy

By Diogo Gonçalves on October 06, 2016 in There Are Free Lunches
Understanding online decision making can help us overcome society's choice paradoxes, and help us deal with the Age of Big Data.
Health Affairs

A Force More Powerful Than Anti-Vaxxers? Economics!

By Peter A. Ubel M.D. on October 06, 2016 in Scientocracy
Price negotiations need to set a balance between protecting public purses and promoting public health.

Peace Through Ignorance?

By William Poundstone on October 05, 2016 in Head in the Cloud
Americans don't know much geography, and maybe that's a good thing, suggests Presidential candidate Gary Johnson.

Big Data and Everyday Life

When it comes to figuring out your musical taste, Pandora is the champ. That's because Pandora is based on Big-Data - and Big-Data is the future in the behavioral sciences.

4 Ways In Which Optimism Helps Entrepreneurs Succeed

Creative, novel ideas, a bias to act, persistence, & bouncing back from failure are all contributors.

The Bonus Effect

By Alfie Kohn on September 27, 2016 in The Homework Myth
If you're told "Do this, and you'll get that," you're likely to become less interested in "this" -- and more interested in "that." Especially if "that" turns out to be money.

Making Better Medical Decisions

By Haider Warraich M.D. on September 26, 2016 in On Modern Medicine
Modern healthcare can come with a dizzying array of options, many of which could mean different destinations.

Should You Quit Your Job When You Start a New Business?

What entrepreneurship research says about working in your startup part-time vs. full-time.

Trying to Explain the Inexplicable

By Gary Smith Ph.D. on September 23, 2016 in What the Luck?
We are tempted to look for psychological explanations for successes and failures, when the more convincing explanation is simply that people get lucky—and luck is fleeting.

Are Men Attracted to Clever Women?

By Robert Burriss Ph.D. on September 22, 2016 in Attraction, Evolved
The claim that men are intimidated by clever women is backed by the results of a new study on speed-dating.

Women’s Right to Say YES to Sexuality

By Aaron Ben-Zeév Ph.D. on September 21, 2016 in In the Name of Love
Women’s sexual right to say “yes” should be respected, including their right to freely shape their sexual performances, without incurring any social or emotional censure.

How To Minimize Drama

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on September 16, 2016 in Ambigamy
Drama is a drag on any relationship, but what is it and how does it arise? Here's a roadmap with the pitfalls marked so you can avoid them.

How Scientists, Too, Can Be Stubborn and Wrong

Ever been troubled by a reversal in scientific opinion? Psychological biases may be part of the problem.

Why Is the Backward Research Method So Effective?

It forces up-front thinking about use of research results and required data, and removes guess-work on the researcher's part.

A Post-Racial America?

America in 2016 offers a sign post on the path from thousands of years of separation through centuries of conflict and exploitation towards a hopeful human family reunion.

Did Religion Evolve to Benefit the Weak or the Powerful?

Who benefits most from religion? You may think you know, but these three observations will make you reconsider.

Big Data Is Nudging You

By Alain Samson Ph.D. on August 30, 2016 in Consumed
Slow to hit the purchase button? Here’s how you may be nudged to buy.
By Internet Archive Book Images [No restrictions], via Wikimedia Commons

10 Ways Your Brain Keeps You From Maintaining Healthy Weight

By Shahram Heshmat Ph.D. on August 25, 2016 in Science of Choice
Our cognitive biases lead to craving and overeating, and contribute to weight gain and obesity.

Should We Treat Business School Students Like Customers?

University professors and administrators should be customer-oriented, but we should not treat students like customers.
Catalina Toma

When You Can Date Everyone, Can You Be Happy With Anyone?

By Catalina Toma Ph.D. on August 21, 2016 in Virtual You
Does having more options affect online daters’ evaluation of their potential partner?

Increase Funding for Mental Illness Now

The time has come to declare war on mental illness and place a priority on funding innovative neurobiological research for better prevention, diagnosis, and early intervention.

Is Empty Nest a Myth?

By Susan Newman Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in Singletons
Is sending your child off to college as emotionally draining and stressful as having a newborn or raising a child during the middle school years? What new research tells us.

Who Deserves the Right to Choose Green?

By Michele Wick Ph.D. on August 16, 2016 in Anthropocene Mind
People who earned their income, as opposed to receiving welfare, were deemed more deserving of the right to spend extra cash to cool the planet.

Who Are Psychology's Geniuses? Part 2

I offer a few more nominations for psychologists whose contributions deserve to be called ingenious, and some analysis of what makes them stand out. See if you agree.