Attention Essential Reads

When Post-Breakup Pursuit Becomes Stalking

By Wendy L. Patrick, Ph.D. on November 19, 2017 in Why Bad Looks Good
Relational pursuit is part of love stories and romantic comedies—even after a breakup. Unfortunately, glamorous depictions of unrequited love create a false sense of normalcy.

Dogs Are More Expressive When We're Looking at Them

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on October 20, 2017 in Animal Emotions
A new study shows dogs display more, but not different, facial expressions when we pay attention to them. The presence of food didn't have any effect, so they're not just using us.

The Most Attractive (Invisible) Asset on a Date

If you set your device on the table on a date, beware: distraction signals disinterest. Instead, cultivate chemistry through the most significant silent compliment: your attention.
Pixabay

Growing Up Too Fast? Early Adversity Affects Fear Responses

By Rebecca Compton Ph.D. on October 03, 2017 in Adopting Reason
The development of brain systems for detecting threats is affected in complex ways by early experiences of deprivation and neglect.

Logical Consequences: Helping Kids Learn from Their Mistakes

Punishment breeds resentment and retaliation. Logical consequences, when they're imposed with kindness and attention, can help kids take responsibility for their actions.

Tears of Connection

By Guest Blogger on October 01, 2017 in The Guest Room
Infant tears may play an underappreciated part in getting parents' attention.

Can Smartphones Make Us More Absent-Minded?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on September 29, 2017 in Media Spotlight
Can smartphones and other digital devices make us more absent-minded in general? New research explores the role that smartphone use can have on our ability to pay attention.

Another Dark Side of 9/11: Manipulating Trauma for Sympathy

By Jean Kim M.D. on September 24, 2017 in Culture Shrink
The heartbreak of 9/11 held the nation's sympathy. For a few wayward souls, the temptation of receiving that powerful sympathy was worth lying for.

I Tried Direct Neurofeedback and the Results Surprised Me

By Zoltan Istvan on September 17, 2017 in The Transhumanist Philosopher
Recently, Grant Rudolph, Clinical Director at Echo Rock Neurotherapy, invited me to try his Direct Neurofeedback techniques.

Beating the Post-Summer Office Blues

By Tasha Eurich Ph.D. on August 29, 2017 in The Power of Insight
Are you struggling to get your head back in the game at work now that summer is over? Here are three research-backed tips to make this your most productive fall yet.

Human-Like Consciousness and Human-Like Intelligence

The relationship between human-like qualities and the capacity for consciousness, the H-C plane, gets more complicated with the consciousness and attention dissociation.

Remembering Accidentally on Purpose

It's a well-known, unfortunate fact of life that some of our memory functions decline as we age, but recent studies suggest there may be a silver lining to that gray cloud.
Volha_R/Shutterstock

You Really Need to Be Tracking Your Dreams

By Patrick McNamara Ph.D. on August 01, 2017 in Dream Catcher
Recording and working with your dreams on a regular basis may allow you to better predict your illnesses, cultivate your creativity and improve your daily social interactions.

The Silver Lining in the ADHD Cloud

Is your ADHD getting in your way? Learn how to turn it into a valuable asset.

Dementia of Youth—Why Our Memories Are So Unreliable

Do you feel a little lost in your life choices? Small mindset shifts can go a long way

Four Reasons Why Paradox Helps Research Get Attention

Do Paradoxes Command Better Attention or Disbelief? The Answer Will Surprise You.

4 Subtle, Underestimated Signs of Female Beauty

It is no secret that when it comes to physical beauty, women are held to higher standards than are men; here are a few of the subtle things that seem to matter a lot.

The Matrix Effect: When Time Slows Down

By Marc Wittmann Ph.D. on July 09, 2017 in Sense of Time
Have you had this kind of experience? Time seemed to slow down during an accident. Here are answers to the questions of why this happens and what then happens in the brain.

Mnemonic Misery

How negative emotions can improve your memory.

Distracted Parents and Problem Children

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on June 28, 2017 in Mental Mishaps
Have you seen them at the parks and in the coffee shops? Parents hypnotized by their phones and computers; unaware of what their children are doing. What happens to those children?

Why Should We Slow Down? The Lost Art of Patience

By Alan Castel Ph.D. on June 10, 2017 in Metacognition and the Mind
Technology allows us to get things done quickly, and we love our smartphones. But slowing down might make you happier and healthier, and also more productive in the long run.

When Distraction Is a Good Thing

By Nir Eyal on June 08, 2017 in Automatic You
Distractions are often seen as a bad thing, but that's not always the case. Here's how you can use distractions to your advantage.

When Emotion Meets Thinking

Can we be sad and creative too?
Pixabay/Free for Commerical Use

Pregnancy Blues

Pregnancy Blues. Feeling sad during pregnancy may require some attention. By Vanessa Babineau.

Consciousness and Information

By Harry Haroutioun Haladjian Ph.D. on May 24, 2017 in Theory of Consciousness
Our conscious experience contains and depends upon many different kinds of information. What is the relationship between how information is processed and conscious awareness?

Do You Learn More When You Make Your Notes Beautiful?

Taking beautiful notes might help students learn.

Fragmentation of Personality

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on April 24, 2017 in Jacob's Staff
Given the complexity of our online lives, how do we define the totality of who we are? Is this changing how we think of being integrated human beings and our creative lives?

Need a Midday Energy Boost? Skip the Caffeine, Take a Walk

Brief bouts of low-to-moderate intensity physical activity are more energizing than a 50 mg dose of caffeine (such as a can of soda or shot of espresso), according to a new study.

Why Hitler Did Not Use Chemical Weapons on the Battlefield

By Gordon Hodson Ph.D. on April 18, 2017 in Without Prejudice
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer recently stated (incorrectly) that Hitler did not use chemical weapons on his own people. How can psychology inform this discussion?

Speeding Up Your Creativity by Slowing Down

New research on making creative headway through attentive looking