Attention Essential Reads

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Observing

Observation permits us to use our inner scientist to discover how our behavior affects our loved one, as well as how we experience others' attempts to show love.

Hyperactive Kids and Playtime - What's the Connection?

Kids with more free play time behave better, are physically healthier and exhibit stronger social and emotional development.

Are We Growing Disconnected in an Age of Connectivity?

Is the constant pull of technology distracting you from what's happening right around you? A few tweaks can help you focus on the here and now.

52 Ways to Show I Love You: No Stealing

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on February 19, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Taking over a loved one's time, attention, property, space or decisions without explicit permission from him or her is stealing. Boundary violations can threaten a relationship.

Seeking Idea Sparks

By Wilma Koutstaal Ph.D. on February 06, 2017 in Our Innovating Minds
What helps us as inspiration seekers?

Somebody’s Watching. Now What?

Does an audience improve or inhibit performance? It depends.

Mind-Wandering on a Leash

Recent neuroimaging research shows that two distinct, often antagonistic brain networks cooperate to produce creative thinking.

Is the "Right to Disconnect" a Human Right?

By Tim Leberecht on January 04, 2017 in The Romance of Work
In France, employers can no longer demand workers stay tethered to their devices and answer email after work hours. Should this new law apply to the U.S. as well?

Here's Why Your Resolutions Can't Rely On Willpower Alone

By David DiSalvo on January 02, 2017 in Neuronarrative
What if the reason our New Years resolutions often fail has less to do with willpower and more with something we chronically ignore right from the start?

How to Shop Smartly When Prices Are Changing Constantly

Rely less on memory & pricing cues, and more on price tracking technology.

The Effects of Digital Technology on Learning

Does technology interfere with classroom learning?

The High Costs of Multitasking for You and Your Kids

By Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed. on November 29, 2016 in Radical Teaching
Explain-Motivate-Prove-Guide is the four-step approach to help your kids reduce time lost into the black hole generated by multitasking (and improve family harmony).

These Dishes Didn’t Wash Themselves

By Ira Hyman Ph.D. on November 22, 2016 in Mental Mishaps
Does anyone ever notice the work you do? Think about your unnoticed housework. All of those dishes washed and all of that laundry folded. Will anyone ever notice?

The Way You Think About Willpower Is Hurting You

By Nir Eyal on November 22, 2016 in Automatic You
Psychological researchers have a name for this phenomenon: it’s called “ego depletion.”
Wil Stewart/Stocksnap.io

Why We All Just Need a Little Attention

Attention is an essential component for our physical health, and it is crucial to all of our closest relationships.

Neuroscience Research Shows How Mood Impacts Perception

According to a new theory of attention and mood, the happier you are, the more you see of the world. Here’s why, and what your brain has to do with it.

Harvard Study Decrypts the Ancient Mystery of Consciousness

By Christopher Bergland on November 05, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
In a groundbreaking new study, neuroscientists at Harvard Medical School may have unearthed the seat of human consciousness.
Ben Harding/iStock

A New Look at the Role of Apps in Distracted Teen Driving

New research reveals app usage is a major risk for distracted driving. The results provide a useful guide for productive conversations between teens and parents.

Consciousness and Empathy

While much of human intelligence does not require one to be consciously aware of it, empathy may be something that necessitates phenomenal consciousness.

Psychology's Crisis Isn't New

By Jonathan Wai Ph.D. on September 30, 2016 in Finding the Next Einstein
What is new is the public attention and change that’s generating. In addition to the replication crisis, here are some other problems with the field that need addressing.

10 Things to Know About Déjà Vu

Acceptance of déjà vu has widened in recent decades, and research psychologists are just beginning to understand this phenomenon.

What Eye Contact Can Do to You

Eye contact has the power to alter our behavior, attention, memory, and appraisal of who's looking at us. Is that always a good thing?

12 Things You Missed While You Were on Your Smartphone

Are you stalled in a digital time warp instead of being there for your loved ones?

$50m Judgment Says Brain Training a Sham

By Richard E. Cytowic M.D. on September 19, 2016 in The Fallible Mind
Letting someone else sharpen your brain sounds great. Except it doesn't work, and you have to do the work yourself. The good news is that it isn't so hard.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Adolescence and Four Skills of Self-Discipline

Developing self-discipline is part of growing independence as one develops the capacity to become one's own authority when it comes to accomplishing what one needs to do.

How to Remember Everything

By Ryan Anderson on September 13, 2016 in The Mating Game
Learning the basics of the Method of Loci technique is possibly one of the most effective ways to spend the next 15 minutes of your life

The #1 Shortcut to Greater Productivity

By Emma M. Seppälä Ph.D. on September 07, 2016 in Feeling It
Why Adderall and other stimulants backfire for productivity—and what to do instead

The Practical Benefits of a Wandering Mind

The next time you’re trying to concentrate and find your mind wandering off task, you might just want to let it go. New research suggests it may be helping you achieve your goals.
Malloreigh via flickr

Want to Be Successful? Spend More Time Staring Into Space

Think about the last time you had a great idea or solved a problem that had been plaguing you—were you in the shower?

Attenuation of Arousal: The Linchpin of Emotional Regulation

By Tom Bunn L.C.S.W. on August 10, 2016 in Conquer Fear Of Flying
Stress hormones grab our attention and prepare us to run or fight, in case action is required. Thereafter, arousal needs to be sharply reduced so we can assess the situation.