Anxiety Essential Reads

How to Foster More Adaptive Thinking

By Gregg Henriques on May 27, 2015 in Theory of Knowledge
A review of how to employ the cognitive approach to maintain an adaptive mindset during stressful conditions.

Anger Management Failures

Anger management fails for the same reason that diets don’t work.

How We Decide Who's Creepy

Given how frequently creepiness gets discussed in everyday life, it is amazing that it has not yet been studied in a scientific way. What I found in an exploratory study suggests that creepiness is a response to the ambiguity of threat; it is not the clear presence of danger that creeps us out, but rather the uncertainty of whether danger is present or not.

What to Do When Your Anxiety Won’t Go Away

Outsmart your brooding ways with these nine mind games. After all, calm is an inside job.

What Is Separation Anxiety?

Some kids beyond their toddler years have a terrible time separating from parents. They may refuse to sleep alone, go on play dates, or attend school. Any attempts at separation may trigger intense fear and tantrums. This situation can be a nightmare for parents. The good news is with early identification and professional guidance treatment is usually very successful.

After the Storm

By Frances Kuffel on May 12, 2015 in What Fat Women Want
Depression teaches helplessness and to really kick it in the ass, I have to get moving, despite my co-occurring social anxiety: moving with intent, with priority, with the knowledge that some of the social interactions called for will tire me, moving for the sake of my dog or someone else.

Why Some Men Find It So Hard to Give In

We expect men to be dominant and women to be submissive, according to traditional gender roles. A man who submits to the authority of others, therefore, runs this risk of violating society’s norms. For some men, the shame of giving in hits particularly hard.

Adolescence and Goal Avoidance

The closer to reaching a valued growth goal an adolescent gets, often the more ambivalent and resistant they can become.

How Many People Take Benzodiazepines?

Benzodiazepines can be helpful in treating anxiety and insomnia. These medications are used more often by elderly adults than by younger people even though there are increased safety concerns with use by older individuals.

Who You Calling Phobic?

Fears about unstable ground are real, say researchers. And that's particularly true after a major quake.

Gender Pathology

If we constructed a society in which life’s roles were as bifurcated by ear lobes as they are in our culture by genitals, then the first thing parents and grandparents would want to know at birth would be attached or unattached, not boy or girl.

Why the Germanwings Tragedy Couldn't Happen in the U.S.

Can a flight attendant in the cockpit keep a deranged pilot from intentionally crashing a plane?

Are You Suffering From Telepressure? Time for the Cure

The benefits of technology may come with a price for employees.

PTSD and Panic Disorder, the Huge Difference

By Hal Mathew on April 21, 2015 in Unagoraphobic
Eternal vigilance is the price of PTSD and panic disorder

I'm Having An Impossible Time With A Break-Up

Breaking Up in The Age of Social Media

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

All of us encounter experiences in life when we may be temporally overwhelmed by a negative emotion, be it anger, pressure, nervousness, despair, or confusion. In these situations, how we choose to “master the moment” can make the difference between proactive versus reactive, and confidence versus insecurity. Here are ten ways to be less reactive in difficult situations...

The Expert's Guide to People Watching

The art of people watching most likely dates back to earliest civilization. Putting psychology’s knowledge about nonverbal behavior to use can help you become a pro at this basic human pastime.

Meaningfully Salient Parenting

Meaningfully salient parenting can be spoken about, but, in essence, it is a deeply heartfelt and intimate engagement between parent and child, mother and father, and all within the family system.

6 Tips for Managing Life With a Control Freak

By Robert Taibbi L.C.S.W. on April 17, 2015 in Fixing Families
It's difficult to live with someone who is always controlling in a variety of ways. Some tips for not taking it personally and for changing the dynamics.

5 Natural Reasons Why Life Is Hard

If you're like me, you've got a computer, a smart phone, a TV, a couch, some pets, a great family, and lots of awesome things - but you still often find that life is hard. Evolutionary psychology can help explain why.

Getting Existential with Josh Rouse

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on April 17, 2015 in Brick by Brick
Josh Rouse shares how he has been able to conquer anxiety through mindfulness.

Breakup: How to Tell If You Suffer from Complicated Grief

Sometimes it is impossible to let go of grief. When you continue to grieve a loss, your condition is called complicated grief. Complicated grief is so severe that psychiatrists now consider it for inclusion in the psychiatric manual for diagnosing mental disorders. Here is how to tell if you suffer from complicated grief.

Are Your Worst Nightmares Also Everyone Else's?

By E E Smith on April 16, 2015 in Not Born Yesterday
They are the grim subject of several centuries-old paintings, in which a black horse (or "night mare") hovers near a sleeping figure. They have been the terrifying theme of movies, past and present––from "I Wake Up Screaming" (1941), to the latest "Nightmare on Elm Street" flick. So, what exactly is a nightmare?

The Joy of Distraction

Negative affect is among the most important triggers of self-control failures.

4 Ways to Disarm Jealousy

Obsessive thinking is inevitably inaccurate.

The Emotional "Trials" of Trial Independence (ages 18 - 23)

For many last stage adolescents (18 - 23) independence can prove too much of a good thing when they flounder in so much freedom, become stressed out, and experience emotional crisis as a result. At this juncture, parents can be of help.

Meet Danielle Meitiv: Fighting for Her Kids’ Rights

By Peter Gray on April 11, 2015 in Freedom to Learn
Danielle and Alexander Meitiv have been giving their children some of the same freedom that they themselves enjoyed as children, in a world that is safer than the one in which they grew up. As a consequence, they have been visited by police, and the county Child Protective Services have threatened to take their children away. Here is my interview with Danielle.

5 Reasons Studies Say You Have to Choose Your Friends Wisely

While it makes sense to befriend people you come in contact with regularly—like neighbors and co-workers—research shows the importance of being selective about who's in your social circle.

A Strength-Based Approach Helps Children

The positive psychology movement has started to ask "what is healthy," "what is working," and "what are a child’s strengths" as central—and often more important—than what is wrong or what disorder or illness does a child have... and this can change lives.

Uncontested Divorce Can Improve a Relationship

By Wendy Paris on April 07, 2015 in Splitopia
New legal processes can improve a relationhip on the other side of marriage. Some of the most exciting innovations in divorce are coming from the legal professionals.