Essential Reads

If You Want to Live Longer, Get a Dog

New data shows that pet ownership can increase the longevity of people with health risk issues.

Do Sharks Feel Pain?

By Michael Tye, Ph.D. on March 21, 2017 in Genuinely Conscious
Sharks are often taken to be natural killing machines. The root of this idea may lie (at least in part) in their apparent inability to feel pain.

25 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Dogs

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on March 13, 2017 in Animals and Us
Why dogs should not drive cars and other findings from the hot new field of canine science.

What Does Information Look Like in the Brain?

Does thinking harder or experiencing deep emotions like love, fear, or anguish light up more neurons? Probably not.

More Posts on Animal Behavior

Why Would a Chimpanzee Use a Tool to Clean a Corpse's Teeth?

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 18, 2017 in Animal Emotions
A novel observation of a female chimpanzee cleaning a corpse's teeth raises many fascinating questions. This discovery forces us to consider what other animals know about death.

Not Just Walking the Dog

A new study help us see what dog walking reveals about human-animal relationships and negotiations of power.

Dog Owners Are Wrong About the Health Benefits of Raw Diets

Despite dog owners' beliefs that raw animal product dog foods are healthier data suggests that they are unsafe.
Bill Davidow

Why Dogs Don’t Use The Internet

What we can learn from dogs about managing the internet.

Animal Behavior and Social Media

By David Dillard-Wright Ph.D. on March 12, 2017 in Boundless
What can we learn about human online behavior by watching other species? Social interaction has the potential for both peace-making and aggression.

Beasts of Burden: Disability and Animal Liberation Revisited

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 12, 2017 in Animal Emotions
A new book by disability and animal activist Sunaura Taylor, clearly outlines the close relationship between these two movements that deal with marginalized and vulnerable beings.

A Man and His Dog

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on March 09, 2017 in How To Do Life
A short-short story

The Lube Effect: Dogs Foster Cooperation and Trust in Humans

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 08, 2017 in Animal Emotions
A new study shows dogs serve as social lubricants to help people get along better. When a dog is present, humans are friendlier, more trusting, more active, and more enthusiastic.

Do Dogs Ever Lie to or Try to Deceive People?

New data shows that dogs are capable of being deceptive around people when it is in their own self-interest.
Support PDX/Flickr

More Fully Living in the Present and Loving in Relationships

In spite of the spotlights shining down at the podium, I could make out her face through the dimly lit houselights...

Can Humans Truly Connect With Nature by Eating a Big Mac?

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 04, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Does meat eating connect us with nature and with ourselves? A recent essay unconvincingly claims it's important for attuning ourselves to the animal world and our animal natures.

It’s the Mode For Men to Have More Sex Partners

A common fallacy mistakes the mean for the mode where numbers of sex partners distinguished by sex is concerned.

Rather Than Kill Animals "Softly," Don't Kill Them at All

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on March 01, 2017 in Animal Emotions
"Efforts to control wildlife should begin wherever possible by altering the human practices that cause human–wildlife conflict and by developing a culture of coexistence."

Do Purebred and Mixed-Breed Dogs Show Behavior Differences?

Purebred and mixed-breed dogs differ in terms of their personality and the likelihood of behavior problems.

Why Do Dog Breeds with Genetic Disorders Suddenly Get Hot?

By Hal Herzog Ph.D. on February 24, 2017 in Animals and Us
Dog breeds like French bulldogs and Chihuahuas are skyrocketing in popularity despite their genetic problems. A new study examines why people are attracted to unhealthy pets.

More Than a Horse: Saying Goodbye to Marvin

By Kimerer LaMothe Ph.D. on February 24, 2017 in What a Body Knows
Marvin, our large, 26-year old chestnut quarter horse, had fallen in the snow, and was unable to stand up by himself. He had to get warm -- soon. What could we do?

Altering the ‘Work’ Experience

By Seth Slater M.F.A. on February 23, 2017 in The Dolphin Divide
How behavioral outlook shapes our drive. When old attitudes backfire, developing new ones becomes crucial.

The Biggest Psychological Mystery We Ignore

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on February 23, 2017 in Ambigamy
All of the biggest philosophical, theological, biological, psychological and sociological questions boiled down to one that most of us haven't heard nor thought about.

Dolphins Who Hang With Mates Display a Positive Spin on Life

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Dolphins who swim together display positive emotions and seem to be more optimistic than those who don't. This cognitive bias lasts for around two months.

Are There Behavior Changes When Dogs Are Spayed or Neutered?

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on February 22, 2017 in Canine Corner
Data shows that spaying or neutering dogs may not reduce behavior problems but actually tends to increase them.

Do Cleaner Shrimp Get Jealous?

By Peter Toohey Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in Annals of the Emotions
The jealous triangle is usually reckoned to be one on one, with the prize, say, a lover. But it’s not all sex, it’s not all one on one, and it’s not all humans.

Dogs: Love, Rejection, Dominance, Training, and Breeding

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 16, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Dogs are in the news a lot and here's a summary of what's "hot." Dogs fall in love and suffer from rejection, dominance should not be used in training, and they're awfully smart.
Teddy Hugo Walker/Nuzzle

Finding Empathy and Ethics When the Odds Feel Overwhelming

How an hour spent with a dog can align us with our values.

Minding Animals: Expanding Views of Human-Animal Studies

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 13, 2017 in Animal Emotions
Minding Animals International offers cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary perspectives on human-animal studies and the nature of human-animal bonds in many different venues.

Murder, She Didn't Write: Why Can Only Humans be Murdered?

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 12, 2017 in Animal Emotions
It's time to change the language we use when writing about killing other animals. Killing animals to manage or to collect them as trophies should rightly be called murder.

"Gosh, My Dog is Just Like Me": Shared Neuroticism

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on February 11, 2017 in Animal Emotions
A new study shows that dogs mirror human personalities more than humans mirror dog personalities and that pessimism and anxiety are shared traits.

Living With/out Fear: The Power of Being a Rational Optimist

By Jason Powers M.D. on February 10, 2017 in Beyond Abstinence
Living a passionate life, devoid of fear.

“Is Your Pet a Psychopath?”

How did deception evolve, and how do you know it's there? Learn these 4 simple, but overlooked signs.

Solving the Problem for Elephants

By G.A. Bradshaw PhD, PhD on February 08, 2017 in Bear in Mind
Captive-held male elephants are underserved by sanctuaries. Here's how the problem is being fixed.

How Dogs Respond to an Angry Expression on a Human Face

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on February 08, 2017 in Canine Corner
Whether your dog looks at your face may depend upon your emotional expression