Essential Reads

The Fat Fetish, Explained

A brief look at Big Beautiful Woman squashing fetishes

Sober Summer!

A survival guide

How Being Knocked Out Of Our Comfort Zones Can Be Beneficial

Sometimes the answers we're looking for come with a cold, hard slap of reality

Are You Numb to Pleasure? How to See Life with New Eyes

The key is we have to see everything in life, even our health, as a gift.

Recent Posts on Addiction

Book Review: Wisdom from the Couch

By Ryan Howes PhD, ABPP on March 22, 2015 in In Therapy
Dr. Jennifer Kunst shares the warmer, friendlier side of Kleinian psychology in this interview and book review.

So You Think You Are In Recovery? Maybe Not.

Does you recovery contain these 10 components?

The End of Stigma

Brazil's campaign to tackle mental health discrimination.

The Urge to Connect

A 3 billion year perspective on where the human race is headed

Rumination and Your Health

By Amelia Aldao Ph.D. on March 19, 2015 in Sweet Emotion
Getting stuck in ruminative cycles is associated with poor physiological outcomes, such as increased cortisol reactivity and prolonged cardiovascular reactivity

4 Predictions for the Future of Addiction Treatment

While there are no easy answers, either for those struggling with substance use disorders or those attempting to help them, science gives us much to hope for, and accumulated experience is teaching us better each day what works and what doesn’t.

Sexism in Mental Health Practice

Misogyny in the mental health system warrants special attention during Women's History Month.

Are You Ready to Change?

By Rubin Khoddam on March 18, 2015 in The Addiction Connection
We're always changing. We want to stop bad habits and start new ones. We want to move our life in a new direction, but the prospect of doing so is daunting. So let's stop forcing ourselves and others to change and deal with where we are at the moment.

How OxyContin Was Allowed to Kill so Many

While it is true that OxyContin abuse is decreasing, the epidemic of prescription drug abuse hasn’t gone away.

When It Comes to Pain Treatment, Less Is Often More

By Dan Mager MSW on March 18, 2015 in Some Assembly Required
Pain brings more people into contact with medical professionals than any other presenting problem. According to the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, it affects more Americans than diabetes, heart disease, & cancer combined. However, recent research when it comes to chronic pain, more treatment does not equate to better outcomes.

Spirituality and Addiction

For years, people have accepted the notion that addiction is a spiritual disorder. Let's take a look at that idea.

Misdiagnosis of Men With Borderline Personality Disorder

By Randi Kreger on March 17, 2015 in Stop Walking on Eggshells
Like women with BPD, men may come from troubled pasts and unstable relationships. At age 3, borderline football star Brandon Marshall witnessed his father nearly beat his mother to death—for the first time. He also lived with his father's drug use and vicious assaults toward women.

Repairing Broken Women and Men

As an addiction treatment professional, I would make the case that substance abuse and addiction are almost entirely preventable.

Making Saves

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on March 17, 2015 in In Excess
Extreme couponing is an activity that combines shopping skills with couponing in an attempt to save as much money as possible while accumulating the most groceries. Extreme couponers spend hours and hours on the internet or scouring scouring rubbish tips or supermarket car parks looking for coupons. But can it be addictive?

Study Finds People with ADHD More Likely to Die Prematurely

The findings of this study can be anxiety-provoking for anyone touched by AD/HD. But the answer may be as simple as effective treatment.

Close Encounters with Criminal Minds

By Katherine Ramsland Ph.D. on March 15, 2015 in Shadow Boxing
During the late 19th century a pathologist-turned-criminologist founded the technique of criminal autobiographies; from within the stories came deep truths.

Are You Having Enough Sex?

As a psychotherapist specializing in sexual and intimacy disorders, I can tell you that for a lot of individuals and couples the amount of sex they’re having (or not having) can be worrisome.

The 'Other' Marshmallow Test

The tower building exercise - and its marshmallow - reveals another secret of successful human behavior, in this case for mental health professionals: when we put the goals of our patients first and foremost, they are going to be more effective, and so will we.

The Risks of College Age Drinking

There are now 135 Collegiate Recovery communities on campuses all over the country. They are geared to support students in recovery from addiction who are seeking a degree in higher education by sharing the goals of providing personal support, preventing occurrences of relapse, and promoting academic performance.

Why Some People Are More Resilient Than Others

By Denise Cummins Ph.D. on March 11, 2015 in Good Thinking
Everyone suffers at least one negative life event. A recent study discovered two factors that characterize resilient people following negative or even traumatic life events.

Is There a Link Between Intelligence and Mental Illness?

Plagued by mental health disorders such as depression, bipolar polar disorder, and schizophrenia, are a host of artists, writers and famous people throughout history.

Cyberstalking: The Fastest Growing Crime

The shift to living virtually has happened so quickly and so pervasively that we have hardly had time to adjust to all the implications. Cyberstalking is a compulsion. It aims to humiliate, control, frighten, manipulate, embarrass, get revenge at, or otherwise harm the victim.

5 Must-Ask Questions When Your Doctor Prescribes Painkillers

So what’s a patient to do when they’re on the receiving end of an opioid painkiller prescription? Talk. It may not feel natural to question your caregiver—they are the one with the medical degree after all—but healthy skepticism is in order when opioids are recommended.

Sexed Text and Writing Wrongs

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on March 10, 2015 in In Excess
Erotographomania means different things to different people. For some it is when individuals derive sexual pleasure and arousal from writing love poems or letters. For others it's the drawing obscene pictures and diagrams in lavatories, public urinals or writing obscene anonymous letters to young girls. But what do we really know about it?

Staying Present and Engaged

By Steve Sisgold on March 10, 2015 in Life in a Body
As human beings, we possess a unique and very powerful ability to focus our attention on the present moment.

How does Love Affect Happiness?

Unlike marriage, love seems to increase happiness significantly. This was the conclusion of a seventy-year long longitudinal study of two socially different groups.

Un-Break My Heart

The time immediately following the shock and bewilderment of a breakup is driven by an overflow of stress chemicals released by your brain in response to the trauma that is happening to you. Your emotions run wild. As the fictional detective Dirk Gently would put it, you are in a state of mind that would make even Mother Teresa spank babies. How can you fall out of love?

Kevin Sessums 2.0: Waking Up After the Fire

By Mark Matousek on March 09, 2015 in Ethical Wisdom
What is the connection between fame and longing? Addiction and loss? Author Kevin Sessums talks about both in his new book, "I Left It On the Mountain"

How We Fall Out of Love

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on March 09, 2015 in Media Spotlight
Though there has been extensive research looking at the psychology of romantic love, is it possible to learn what can cause people to fall out of love with their significant other? For that matter, how is it possible to move on after a relationship comes to an end? A new article published in Review of General Psychology raises some intriguing questions about this.

Hopeful Research for Stopping Suicides

Promising suicide research in military