Essential Reads

The Mindful Geek

A Radically New Way to Quit Smoking

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

10 Ways to Be Less Reactive in Difficult Situations

Breakup: How to Tell If You Suffer from Complicated Grief

The emotional responses to a severe breakup can resemble the responses to death.

Recent Posts on Addiction

Journaling Clears Out the Bad, Builds Up the Good

By Jason Powers M.D. on May 03, 2015 in Beyond Abstinence
Multiple studies show that disclosing emotions through journaling is therapeutic, which is why I encourage my patients to write for their own benefit and consumption.

Simplifying Heroin

Heroin addition is often described as a disease like any other. It is not.

Posttraumatic Growth

“What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.”

Tips to Avoid Pain Recovery Relapse

I typically use the famous quote from W.L. Bateman, “if you keep on doing what you’ve always done, you’ll keep on getting what you’ve always got,” when patients come into treatment after having no success with methods of pain relief.

How Bullying Changes Your Life’s Course If You're LGBTQ

This happens across the board in many different socio-economic groups, but it particularly pronounced among those who identify as gay, lesbian, transgendered, queer or bisexual (LGBTQ).

There's a Hidden Dark Side to Being an Entrepreneur

The hidden secret among many entrepreneurs is the psychological price they pay for their choices. The demands of business ownership may place entrepreneurs at a higher risk of specific mental health problems.

Is surfing the Internet addictive?

By Susan Greenfield Ph.D. on April 30, 2015 in Mind Change
New research shows that aimless, excessive Internet use is associated with changes in the brain consistent with addictions. What could be addictive about endlessly surfing the web?

Learning to Decline the Call to Sugar

If stress relief is a reason you are craving sugar, look for alternative means of stress relief such as exercise, meditation, yoga, and even venting to friends.

The Psychological Damage of Alcohol Abuse Can Be Lethal

The social and psychological consequences of alcohol abuse can be deadly.

When Is a Doormat Not a Doormat?

Irrelationships may cross the line into frank abuse. However, the abused partner's seeming acquiescence may not be simple acceptance of the unacceptable. Despite his abusiveness, she may believe her partner needs what she has to offer. And her abuser may be equally committed to demanding it even while refusing to validate it.

Is It Time to Ban Food Ads?

We are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that is linked to 18 percent of all deaths for those ages 40-85. It has boosted medical costs by an estimated $150 billion annually and has sent the incidents of related illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease soaring. Obesity is also related to depression and diminished quality of life. It’s never been more apparent

All The Rage

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on April 28, 2015 in In Excess
Beserkers is a culture-bound condition historically affecting Norsemen. The condition manifested itself among males only as an intense fury and rage (berserkergang, i.e., “going beserk”) and mostly occurred in battle situations. But what more do we know about it from a psychological perspective?

7 Signs You May Be A Workaholic

Could you be addicted to your work? Researchers have identified seven warning signs that could indicate you have a problem.

The Mindful Geek

The last 50 years have seen an explosion of anti-smoking campaigns as public health officials realize that smoking is a chief cause of cancer, cardiovascular illness and a host of other diseases. To some extent these campaigns have worked: We are seeing a dramatic reduction in smoking among younger generations. Good progress, but frankly it isn’t enough.

My Sunday Morning With Mental Health Advocates

I wanted to spend our time hearing the thoughts of those who attended, families and patients, about they believed stood in the way of improving mental health services and what we could do about it

Peanut Butter is My Gateway Drug

By Gregg McBride on April 25, 2015 in The Weight-ing Game
Taking the taboo and shame out of a binge can help shed light—and perhaps even some laughter—onto the addictive habits that might be holding us back from finding forgiveness, compassion and (ultimately) success.

Meditation Improves Brain Function

There is a great deal of evidence that meditation, in particular mindfulness meditation, improves the brain, and the research is teaching us a lot about how and why that happens.

Pain in the Family

There are approximately 116 million people currently suffering from chronic pain. And if you’ve read the headlines recently, you know that many people with chronic pain are also struggling with opiate dependence. When we think of treatment and intervention, many of us only consider the person in pain. However, family and friends are impacted as well.

Addiction: A Systems Perspective

By Dan Mager MSW on April 21, 2015 in Some Assembly Required
The dynamics of systems theory and neuroplasticity can provide valuable windows through which we can better understand the respective processes that contribute to addiction and recovery.

Are You Made Of The Write Stuff?

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on April 21, 2015 in In Excess
Many people that know me would probably describe me as a ‘write-aholic’ based on the number of articles and papers that I have had published. When it comes to addictions in academia, ‘writing addiction’ is just about the best one you can have. Here are my tips to turn you into a productive (and excessive) writer

Please Let Me Act out on My Sugar Addiction in Peace

By Anna David on April 21, 2015 in After Party Chat
Those who consider themselves sugar addicts but then quit never tire of lecturing other sugar consumers about the dangers of that white powder. Why can't they just let us leave us alone with our cookies?

A Betrayal Anxiety Quiz for Women in an Unequal Workplace

When limited opportunities for advancement in a workplace exist, women often find themselves competing for the few positions available. Oftentimes, women who have been betrayed by ladder climbing colleagues are then prone to sabotage others.

10 Tips to Change From Reactive to Proactive in Situations

All of us encounter experiences in life when we may be temporally overwhelmed by a negative emotion, be it anger, pressure, nervousness, despair, or confusion. In these situations, how we choose to “master the moment” can make the difference between proactive versus reactive, and confidence versus insecurity. Here are ten ways to be less reactive in difficult situations...

Helping Veterans with PTSD Using Yoga

Not only should the VA continue with pilot studies of holistic therapies, but evidence should be taken from related fields, such as addiction treatment, where these therapies have been used for years with great success.

You Don’t Want to Miss: “Prescription Thugs” at Tribeca

This weekend is the start of the Tribeca Film Festival. At the festival, the documentary film, “Prescription Thugs,” will be screened. I am honored to be featured in this film and to help educate the public about the grave danger that is posed by the abuse of prescription medications.

Cyberbullying? There’s an App for That

In the 2004 teen comedy “Mean Girls,” a central plot point is a notebook filled with vicious rumors and gossip — the “Burn Book,” it is called. Now the concept has been taken into the social media age with the “Burnbook” app.

Breakup: How to Tell If You Suffer from Complicated Grief

Sometimes it is impossible to let go of grief. When you continue to grieve a loss, your condition is called complicated grief. Complicated grief is so severe that psychiatrists now consider it for inclusion in the psychiatric manual for diagnosing mental disorders. Here is how to tell if you suffer from complicated grief.

Body Punishment

By The Book Brigade on April 16, 2015 in The Author Speaks
Obsessive-compulsive disorder takes many forms, but all of them involve repetitive behaviors that often create vicious cycles of anxiety and shame. Maggie Lamond Simone punished herself to maintain a public face—until the same disorder was diagnosed in her child. Only then did the healing begin.

Empathy

How do we come by what's morally right or wrong?