News

Cerebellum Stimulation Influences Frontal Cortex Functioning

Stimulating the cerebellum normalizes frontal cortex activity in lab rats with abnormal dopamine processing, a new study reports. These findings could have many human applications.

Effective Communication During Relationship Conflict

By David Ludden Ph.D. on March 29, 2017 in Talking Apes
No communication style works in all cases. Instead, we need to tailor our approach to the specifics of the situation.

Bragging on Social Media Can Backfire

New research shows that posting on Facebook about your accomplishments can make you appear immodest, but praise from friends is likely to boost your social capital.

What's in a Name?

By Drew Boyd on March 28, 2017 in Inside the Box
A person’s facial appearance can be significantly influenced by their given name, according to new research, perhaps due to the existence of shared face-name prototypes.

To Reach Your Goals, Like What You Do

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 28, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
One of the hardest tradeoffs for people to make is between what they desire to do in the short-term versus what they want for themselves in the long-term.

Making Sense of FBI Director James Comey's Testimony

By Joe Navarro M.A. on March 27, 2017 in Spycatcher
Too often we talk about politicians talking to Russian as though there were no threat—there is always a threat with Putin in charge.

Diabetes Risk and the Early Stages of Schizophrenia

People with schizophrenia are at higher risk for developing diabetes.

Why Virtual Reality Could Be a Mental Health Gamechanger

We’re still a long way from from being able to provide timely treatment to everyone who needs it, but we could be on the brink of dramatic change thanks to VR.
Jostein Hauge/Shutterstock

Americans Are Having Less Sex

By Tim Cole Ph.D. on March 27, 2017 in Intimate Portrait
Are you having less sex these days? You're not alone.

The Forgotten Rural Gifted Child

What can we do to help talented students from rural backgrounds?

New Study Identifies "Microdreams"

By Michelle Carr on March 25, 2017 in Dream Factory
An exciting new paper published in Neuroscience of Consciousness zooms in on a new avenue for dream research: the Microdream.

Belief in Sexual Compatibility Can Sour Your Sex Life

The satisfaction we derive from sex is largely influenced by the attitudes we hold about how it should play out with our partner(s).

Love at First Sight: New Research on Who's Attracted to Whom

Whether or not you believe in love at first sight, there’s a case to be made for instant attraction. New research on speed-dating shows how personality affects romantic choices.

A Deeper Significance Found in Choice of Pronouns

By Lydia Denworth on March 23, 2017 in Brain Waves
New research on "you" reveals the power of pronouns in helping us process and make meaning from hard times.

The Psychology Behind London's Terrorist Attacker

A recent study found that much tactical planning goes into lone-actor terrorist events.

What Happens When You Lie by Telling the Truth?

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 22, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Deception is a common activity among people. There are many ways to do it, and they have different influences on ourselves and other people.

How "Daily Uplifts" Can Counter Depression

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on March 21, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
When we're depressed we tend to think that nothing will lift our mood. Results from a new study suggest otherwise.

Impact of Traumatic Stress on Brain Development

New research points to neurobiological sex differences in youth with PTSD.
Richard McDowell/Shutterstock

Self-Deception Helps Us Accomplish Goals

By Tim Cole Ph.D. on March 20, 2017 in Intimate Portrait
More often than not, we lead with our goals and desires, not the facts. New research on how our ability to delude ourselves can be quite useful.

Life Expectancy Projected to Increase Worldwide

By Susan McQuillan M.S., RDN on March 20, 2017 in Cravings
Researchers find U.S. lags behind other high-income countries.

Is Your Self-Esteem Too High to Be Successful?

By Rob Henderson on March 20, 2017 in After Service
Self-esteem can be dangerous. Here is a better option backed by research.

Responding to Your Partner's Attachment Style

By David Ludden Ph.D. on March 20, 2017 in Talking Apes
According to recent research, to get what you want out of a relationship, you first have to give your partner what they want.

Is Mental Illness the Rule Rather Than the Exception?

We hear all the time that 1 in 5 people struggle with a psychiatric disorder. New research now suggests that we have it backwards.

Intellectual Humility Augments Nonpartisan Open-Mindedness

Regardless of your party or religious beliefs, new research from Duke shows that intellectual humility may be the key to breaking down barriers that divide us.

Two-Legged Walking and Human Skull Traits Evolved in Tandem

Our hominid ancestors' ability to walk upright on two legs evolved in tandem with distinctive traits of the human skull, according to a new follow-up study.

Science News: Believe It or Not?

A new study demonstrates that media reports often miss the real news.

Teen Pregnancies Fall But School Sex Ed Doesn’t Work. Huh?

By Michael Castleman M.A. on March 15, 2017 in All About Sex
The number of teen pregnancies has plummeted by more than half in a generation. But a new analysis shows that school-based sex education classes don't work. How is this possible?

How Would Trumpcare Affect Mental Health Care?

People addicted to opioids and rural Americans would lose "big league"

Machine Learning and Antidepressant Response

By David Hellerstein M.D. on March 14, 2017 in Heal Your Brain
Machine learning offers a powerful new method of exploring response to antidepressant medicine and a host of other treatments throughout medicine, a JAMA Psychiatry report shows.

Cracking a Joke At Work Can Have a Surprising Payoff

By Art Markman Ph.D. on March 14, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Humor is common in the workplace. Does it make help people to achieve their goals at work?

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