wrote:

In 1980, 72% of males and 61% of females reported having had sex.

You have to be careful with these kinds of "observations". Numbers of sexual encounters and numbers of different partners has to equal EXACTLY the same totals for men as a group and women as a group, assuming straight encountres. Because, any doofus knows, if, for example, a man is having a new partner, there is EXACTLY ONE woman there ALSO having a new partner. Unless the guy is counting a sex doll as a real partner.

So then you're left with more tenuous ways of trying to deal with the above discrepancy, like somehow proposing that females who have sex have an average GREATER number of partners than men to make up for the difference. Or as some suggested in this forum elsewhere, with no evidence whatsoever, the difference is the way men have more sex than women (number of partners or number of encounters) is entirely made up by prostitutes who are magically NOT counted in the tally for some reason. I guess prostitutes aren't considered females, yet the sex men have with them is still considered valid for the survey? LOL

wrote:

Furthermore, the old double standard that allowed young men to “sow their wild oats” while expecting young women to remain chaste seems to be a thing of the past.

I'm glad to see this sentence is logically accurate in that it refers to "allowed" and "expecting", NOT what actually happened. Men never sowed their wild oats with many women while women were generally chaste. Was never mathematically possible. Unless men did it with prostitutes who don't count in the survey. You know, the "town whore" took up all the slack. Uh huh, right.

wrote:

Those who reported having sex were then asked about number of lifetime partners and age of first sexual intercourse. In 1980, the median number of lifetime sex partners for college men was 4, and this number has remained fairly constant through 2010. For college women, the median number was 3, again remaining unchanged from 1980 to 2010.

I call BS on this statistic. It's mathematically remotely possible because it's the "median". Would have been patently absurd if it was "average" as that is directly related to the total which has to be exactly even. So the only way this rather large discrepancy could be true is if a small number of women have a very large number of partners, while men tend to be more even in that sense. Also hard to believe because men tend to have sex with younger women, so if anything it should be women reporting more partners.

Any discrepancy between males and female numbers in these kinds of surveys need to be explained, or considered as indicators of survey reporting dishonesty. Or how it often is the case that women will not consider an encounter to be sexual while the man will (such as a woman giving a man a hand job in the dormitory, without him reciprocating -- a not uncommon scenario).