HARD TIMES COME AGAIN NO MORE
Stephen Foster
Let us pause in life's pleasures and count its many tears,
While we all sup sorrow with the poor;
There's a song that will linger forever in my ears;
Oh Hard times come again no more.

Tis the song, the sigh of the weary,
Hard Times, hard times, come again no more
Many days you have lingered around my cabin door;
Oh hard times come again no more.

While we seek mirth and beauty and music light and gay,
There are frail forms fainting at the door;
Though their voices are silent, their pleading looks will say
Oh hard times come again no more.

Tis the song, the sigh of the weary,
Hard Times, hard times, come again no more
Many days you have lingered around my cabin door;
Oh hard times come again no more.

There's a pale weeping man who toils his life away,
With a worn heart whose better days are o'er:
Though his voice would be merry, 'tis sighing all the day,
Oh hard times come again no more.

Tis the song, the sigh of the weary,
Hard Times, hard times, come again no more
Many days you have lingered around my cabin door;
Oh hard times come again no more.

Tis a sigh that is wafted across the troubled wave,
Tis a wail that is heard upon the shore
Tis a dirge that is murmured around the lowly grave
Oh hard times come again no more.

Hi

My sister Anne died from burns before I was born. She was 4 years of age. My mother was pregnant with my brother, Aidan at the time; a very traumatic time for mother AND child. This was 1947. I was born in 1950. My family consisted of 6 girls and five boys. My mother died in 1971 from cancer of the spine, aged 56 and my father died in 1975, from Congestive heart-failure, aged 65. My brother Patrick was the victim of a hit & run, in 1981, causing massive head injuries, resulting in his committal to a psychiatric hospital for the rest of his life. There was no long-stay unit anywhere for brain damaged patients. My brother Aidan and I visited him in the hospital nightly for 25 years. My sister Theresa was found dead in 2005 from an asthmatic attack. Patrick died in 2006 from the effects of MRSA infection. Maria died in 2007 from cancer of the lungs and Aidan died in 2008 from suicide. He couldn't fill the emotional gap left after Patrick's death. I on the other hand started drinking heavy and the result was Diabetes and Diabetic neuropathy in both feet. My best friend, Joe, died in 2009 from a heart attack. My sister-in-law died in 2011 from a brain tumour. My sister Clare died in 2013 from breast cancer, aged 60. My niece, Annette, died in 2016 from breast cancer, aged 32 and my sister Phyllis died of cancer 10pm 27/8/2017.

She was aged 64 and died of cancer of the liver, which was very painful. She put off going into the hospice for the fear of knowing there was no coming out once she went in. But it was a mistake, for she suffered not having 24/7 care. She was miserable and finally decided to go to the hospice. There she received the best of care 24/7 and was pain-free.

I believe that the morphine pump should be in the control of the patient.
I picture the scenario where I call my friends to the hospice for my “going away party”. I would take care of any legal business and say my goodbyes at the end of the night. Then I would set the pump to "kick-in" about 30 minutes later, having taken my sleeping tablets.
We MUST rid ourselves of our SLAUGHTERHOUSE THEOLOGY, which teaches pain is redemptive -- it's not!
We ALL have our "sell by date"! And our departure from this life should be a "good" experience! I would love to be as "high as a kite" in my last hour of life!