Ryan Daley, Jaclyn Ford, Ph.D., and Elizabeth Kensinger, Ph.D.

Ryan Daley is a Ph.D. candidate in Psychology and Neuroscience at Boston College. His research focuses on how older adults employ social and emotional information to support successful learning. While there are many age-related declines in cognition, his work seeks to understand how the preservation of social and emotional information processing can be harnessed to assist memory in older adults. Ryan received his B.A. in Psychology and Philosophy from Gordon College. 

Jaclyn Ford, Ph.D., is a Research Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Boston College. Her research examines how healthy aging can influence the way people experience and, later, recall emotional events from their daily lives. Using a combination of behavioral and neuroimaging methods, her work investigates age-related changes in the brain that may promote a more positive perspective on past negative events. She received her B.S. in Psychology from The College of William and Mary, and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She has published her research in journals such as Neurobiology of Aging, Journal of Neuroscience, and Psychology and Aging. 

Elizabeth Kensinger, Ph.D., is a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Boston College and Director of the Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory. She received her undergraduate degree in Psychology and Biology from Harvard University and her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from MIT. She has authored over 200 scientific articles and is author of the book Emotional Memory Across the Adult Lifespan. Her research seeks to answer questions such as: Why do we remember some moments from our past, such as those imbued with emotion, better than others? Why is sleep so important for memory? How does memory change as adults get older, and what can we do to minimize the impact of negative changes and to capitalize on domains of strength? 

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Achievements of the Aging Mind

Discussing challenges and successes across the adult lifespan. Read now.

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