Essential Reads

Problem Solving Buffers The Brain Against Anxiety

By David DiSalvo on January 17, 2018 in Neuronarrative
When it comes to managing anxiety, science just lent more credibility to the advice to “stay busy.”

A Law Enforcement A.I. Is No More or Less Biased Than People

By Matthew Hutson on January 17, 2018 in Psyched!
When does it make sense to rely on algorithms?

Three Words That Helped My 13-Year-Old Study Better

Are you a parent who is trying to figure out how to help your child study? Cognitive psychology research might help.

How Suppressed Emotions Enter Our Dreams and Affect Health

We push negative thoughts out of our waking minds and they appear in our dreams, doing little good. How can we find a balance to address negative emotions with positive intent?

The Experience of Fear

By Jennifer Verdolin Ph.D. on January 16, 2018 in Wild Connections
We, and other species, have evolved the ability to rapidly adopt an appropriate strategy to respond to life-threatening, fearful, or aggressive encounters.

Does the Flu Trick People into Being Sociable?

From an evolutionary perspective, a virus that manipulates its host’s behavior so as to get into as many bodies as possible could be selected. The flu may be such a virus ...

How 1930s Psychoanalysts Thought Self-Harm Explained War

Psychoanalysts in the 1930s saw self-harm as evidence of universal drives, which explained not only self-injury but war and violence. What is the legacy of their research today?

Homer Simpson as Parent

Humor is very often a sneaky way to engage with cultural and moral issues that would meet with resistance if they were discussed in a more serious way.

Porn "Addiction" in the Mainstream Media

The mainstream media presents pornography addiction as a legitimate disorder when in fact this is far from certain. In addition it offers questionable advice and suggestions.

MLK: Expanding Compassion to All Brothers and Sisters

 “I am moved to break the betrayal of my own silences and to speak from the burnings of my own heart.”

Having an Answer to “Where Did the Time Go?”

Be aware of the limited time you have to make the most of your life, and then do it.

How Can We Make Conversational Agents More Humanlike?

Do we want robots that cough and whose tummies grumble? Research suggests that we do.

Post-Traumatic Growth and Post-Traumatic Stress Can Coexist

By Christopher Bergland on January 14, 2018 in The Athlete's Way
We commonly associate PTSD with natural disasters. Surprisingly, a new study reports that personal growth can coexist with post-traumatic stress in the years following.

Look Closer: How to Spot Human Trafficking Victims

Human trafficking is an insidious epidemic, but it is not invisible. They key is knowing what to look for, and where to look.

The 2 Ways to Become the Cool Person You Always Wanted to Be

The two factors that control your being seen as truly cool come under scrutiny in a new study of the personality traits of those we want to emulate.

Women Who Are Comfortably Single at Midlife

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on January 12, 2018 in Living Single
A small study of midlife single women shows how they come to reject the story that tells them they are deficient and instead live full and meaningful lives.

Individual Differences

People come in all shapes and sizes, physically and psychologically. Here are nine of the core personality dimensions on which we vary from each other.

The Connection Between Writing and Sleep

By Lydia Denworth on January 12, 2018 in Brain Waves
Do you have trouble falling asleep? A new study reveals that writing for a few minutes is an easy and effective solution. But what you write about makes all the difference.

Does Getting Older Mean Losing Your Sense of Humor?

By Scott Weems Ph.D. on January 12, 2018 in What’s So Funny?
Getting older doesn't mean losing your sense of humor. So long as you work on it.

The Dangers of Alarm Fatigue

In a hospital setting, 85 percent of alarms are false. But ignoring an alarm can prove deadly.

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