Essential Reads

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Dealing with Disappointment

By Tara Well Ph.D. on June 25, 2017 in The Clarity
Disappointment can be an opportunity to get clarity on what you really want -- get it!

Do you have to be self-centered to be self-actualized?

What would you do to reach your highest potential? A new series of studies raises doubts about the classical view of self-actualization.

Parental Alienation and its Repair

By Molly S. Castelloe Ph.D. on June 25, 2017 in The Me in We
Parental alienation and how to recover the parent-child relation.

Coping with Micro-Stressors: How Do I Work My Smart TV?

How do I work my Smart TV? What can we do about micro-stressors?

When Words are Deadly Weapons: Michelle Carter´s Conviction

For people who would rather text than talk, words can be more dangerous than sticks and stones. Texting is pervasive and persuasive, facilitating cyber courtship to cyber stalking.

8 Ways to Ask Questions and Improve Your Relationships

Knowing how to ask the right questions is a fundamental skill to relationship-building. Based on new research, these 8 tips will help you get the answers you need.

How Good is Your Psychiatrist? Finding Roses Among Thorns

By Georgia Ede MD on June 24, 2017 in Diagnosis: Diet
Unhappy with your current psychiatrist? Can't find a psychiatrist? You're not alone—here are some insights and tips that can help.

The Psychology of Selfies

By David Ludden Ph.D. on June 24, 2017 in Talking Apes
A new study shows how people adjust the camera angle of their selfies to manage the impression they want to make on other persons.

Why Do We Ask Why?

By Mario Livio Ph.D. on June 23, 2017 in Why?
Curiosity fuels brain growth, and brain growth drives curiosity. And you wouldn't be so curious if your ancestors hadn't learned to cook.

HiTOP: The Future of Mental Health Diagnosis is Here

By David J Ley Ph.D. on June 23, 2017 in Women Who Stray
A revolutionary new approach to mental health diagnosis offers new ways to resolve old diagnostic controversies.

Genes, Ions, and Other New Frontiers in Psychiatry

A gene related to ion channels common to many families with mental illness leads us to new discoveries and treatments based on actual brain pathology.

Heat Wave Temperatures Make It Tougher to Do the Right Thing

As millions of people endure record-breaking heat waves, a new study reminds us of the psychological impact high temperatures can have on prosocial behaviors.

The Knee-Jerk Apologist

Why do some people apologize for everything?

Feeling Powerful Changes How We Respond to Being Stared At

Perceiving ourselves to be higher in status can buffer us from feeling intimidated.

Do You Need Drugs for Your "Chemical Imbalance"?

By Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. on June 22, 2017 in Think, Act, Be
Research reveals some surprising news about the role of serotonin in depression—and suggests millions of Americans taking drugs for depression would do just as well on placebo.

Death Is Inevitable but Not Inevitably Dreadful

In some circumstances, dying may be less awful than people think.

In Pursuit of Happiness: Why Pain Helps Us Feel Pleasure

By Brock Bastian Ph.D. on June 22, 2017 in The Other Side
Is happiness just about the good times? Do painful experiences only make us unhappy? Here is new research on why our painful experiences are in fact necessary for happiness.

Free Speech and Thought on Campus

Whatever one's views are concerning politics, ethics, and religion, we should engage in discussion, dialogue, and debate about these issues.

Humor Sometimes Makes Stressful Situations Better

By Art Markman Ph.D. on June 21, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Jokes and witty conversation can make you feel closer to the people around you. Is this how humor helps with stress?

The Badass Personalities of People Who Like Being Alone

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on June 21, 2017 in Living Single
What are the personality characteristics of people who like spending time alone? What about people who are unafraid to be single? Four studies offer an affirming profile.

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