Extroversion

Extroversion

All About Extroversion

Extroverts—or outgoing, energetic, talkative people—are thought to make up anywhere from half to three-quarters of the American population. Extroversion, as a personality trait, was first proposed by noted psychiatrist Carl Jung in the 1920s. The word generally refers to a state of being where someone “recharges,” or draws energy, from being with other people, as opposed to from being alone (known as introversion). As such, people who identify as extroverts tend to zip through the world in search of novel experiences, social connections, and leadership opportunities that allow them to satisfy their need to interact with other humans as much as possible. Someone who is highly extroverted will likely feel bored, or even anxious, when they’re made to spend too much time alone.

Though many psychologists argue that extroversion and introversion exist on a sliding scale, and that very few people can be “pure” extroverts, someone’s degree of extroversion is a core factor of their personality and is generally difficult to modify. True extroverts are often considered “the life of the party,” but they can clash with more introverted types, who may find an extrovert’s energy and enthusiasm overwhelming or difficult to tolerate.

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