Photo by Kristin Meekhof
Source: Photo by Kristin Meekhof

     You’ve hit rock bottom (again) and you don’t know where to start. Your new year’s resolution took a detour the second week of January. And now you lack the cash to buy into another program, not to mention your schedule is crammed full with deadlines. Here are ten things you can do to help yourself get back your New Year’s Goals back on track.

1. Adjust your thinking. Realize that it is okay to hit the reset button for a “do over”. The flu may have wrecked your early morning workout schedule or the car repair sent your budget sideways, but it is never too late to begin again.

2. Amend your goals. Remember it is better to do something than nothing. For example, if your goal was to meditate daily but you found with your schedule it works better to do it a four days a week then make this tweak.

3. Practice forgiveness. Perhaps you made a pinky swear with your best friend and they failed to follow through, forgive them. Holding onto this grudge takes up energy and you could be using this on something productive. And if it is yourself that you need to make amends with do it.

4. Focus on the end goal. If your goal is to write the pitch for your team then think about how relieved you will feel when it is done instead of thinking about how stressful the process can be. Stress can be paralyzing and keep you frozen. Try beginning at the end and look backwards. 

5. Give yourself grace. For many your day can be impacted with a single phone call. In the morning you had planned to make a healthy dinner for your children and then the school called and your child is sick and needs to be picked up. Now you’re taking work home and getting to the market is out of the question. Instead of beating yourself up for not going to the market yesterday, give yourself a pass.

6. Understand that perfection isn’t always possible. For over- achievers this is a difficult idea to accept. Perfection is often the force that propels them forward; however, it is not always possible.

7. Practice optimism. When you tell yourself your goal is out of reach and may never happen you’re not exactly inspiring confidence in yourself.  Positive thinking can carry you farther in the short and long run.  

8. Practice gratitude.  The very act of gratitude focuses your attention on something or someone that is good. And taking time out to say "thank you" is a way to express kindness, and it gives you the opportunity to shift your perspective on your circumstances.

9. Ask others for feedback. If you’ve hit a rut in your plan, seek out feedback from someone who is currently doing the work you desire. Often distance runners struggle with injuries and other setbacks, and obtaining insight from other runners can provide wisdom.

10. Question yourself. Ask yourself this question: Am I passionate about my goal? If passion doesn’t underlie your goal chances are you will continue to struggle in reaching your mark.

Pushing the reset button can happen at anytime. You don't have to begin your journey on New Years day. And now that you know what challenges arise in reaching your goal, you can make the necessary adjustments to reach success.

Kristin Meekhof is a licensed master's level social worker. She completed her graduate work at the University of Michigan and obtained her undergraduate degree at Kalamazoo College. She is the co- author of A Widow's Guide to Healing with cover blurbs from Deepak Chopra, MD, FACP and Maria Shriver.

Kristin will be at the Royal Oak Public Library on February 11, 2017. This is a free event. Link here.

Kristin will be a panelist this Harvard Medical School conference. Continuing education credits are available. She can be reached via her website.

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