My Sunday Morning With Mental Health Advocates

I wanted to spend our time hearing the thoughts of those who attended, families and patients, about they believed stood in the way of improving mental health services and what we could do about it

The 'Other' Marshmallow Test

The tower building exercise - and its marshmallow - reveals another secret of successful human behavior, in this case for mental health professionals: when we put the goals of our patients first and foremost, they are going to be more effective, and so will we.

Hope: Entertainer of the Century, A Book Review

Bob Hope was arguably the most successful American entertainer of the 20th century.

When Mental Illness Enters The Family

My TEDx talk, whose link is in this blog, offers four messages for families with a loved one with a mental illness. I hope you will view this talk, which offers practical advice and hope.

Je Suis Charlie: A First Person Account From the Paris Rally

Paris was full of people in its streets, nameless and without renown, coming from everywhere – a rainbow of colors, religions, ethnicities, and social classes, marching for freedom of expression, saying no to extremism.

Suspicious Minds: A Book Review by Dr. Lloyd Sederer

If you want a deep, smart, entertaining dive into the history of mental illness, especially delusions, pick up a copy of “Suspicious Minds.” As Drs. Joel and Ian Gold remark, “Today’s delusion is tomorrow’s headline.”

A Most Violent Year

The lawlessness of New York in 1981 is the subject of Participant Media’s year-end release of A Most Violent Year, as well as one man’s effort to find a way past the violence that threatens to ruin him, his family, and his life’s work.

Violence as a Public Health Problem: A Most Violent Year

JC Chandor, the writer and director of A Most Violent Year saw how the school shooting in Newtown, CT, the town next to where he is raising his family, led to arming security guards. He was moved to cinematically paint the story of violence, using a lawless New York City in 1981 as his canvas, not seeing then what it had to do with public health.

Depression: Not Just in Your Head, It’s Also in Your Genes

We all want to understand telomeres, the caps at the ends of our DNA strands, because the longer they are the longer we tend to live – and live freer of age related illnesses like heart disease, stroke, dementia, diabetes, and osteoporosis - and are free of depression.

How To Get Someone to Change Their Mind

At the end of WW II, when the Allies pushed through the German lines into Paris, the Nazi Governor was to give the order to blow up the city. What happened that he did not? How was his mind changed?

Fixing the Broken Mental Health System

It has been said that the measure of a society is its humane attention to the sick and vulnerable. When real reform, transformation, comes to mental health and addiction services we will meet that moral and ethical standard – and we will be able to serve so many in need.

Here One Day

A life lived with and lost to bipolar illness.

The Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming

Here is your invitation to enter the rapture of lucid dreams, so say these authors and guides to expanding our nocturnal experience and adventure. Do you know what a lucid dream is?

Thomas Szasz, M.D.: A Profile by Dr. Lloyd Sederer

Some of the last century's greatest psychiatrists frequently argued with him. They would claim he was wrong, but brilliant.

The Hundred-Foot Journey

La France aux Français (France for the French)? Mais non – not in The Hundred-Foot Journey! La France is for tout le monde, or so we can feel - though only after we also make a 100 foot journey into the community of mankind.

Gahan Wilson: Born Dead, Still Weird

Wilson, a renown cartoonist, was born dead in the American mid-west in 1930. A pediatrician happened on him before he was placed in a casket and held him under cold water until he revived. It seems as if he has spent a lifetime embodying this moment as metaphor in his dark, shocking, and ultimately life affirming art.

"Remnants of a Life on Paper"–A Book Review

If you are looking for reasons to believe in God, they abound in this book. If you are looking for reasons not to believe in God, they abound in this book.

The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves

“How can I help?” asks Stephen Grosz as he receives a new patient in his psychoanalytic office in London. The subjects unearthed for the reader include envy, loss, hate, boredom, winning (as losing), making contact and being present, pain, negativity, betrayal, gratitude, and wanting the impossible–to mention a few.

IDA: A Film Review

It is a pilgrimage that Ida and her aunt go on, since its ultimate purpose (unbeknownst to them at first) is to transform each of their lives, to liberate each of them to find peace.

Four Funerals and a Wedding

Retaining normalcy in relationships, work and community during the road to loss and in its aftermath are the best medicine that exists for recovery.

Privacy, Liberty and Another Mass Murder

Privacy and Liberty have become covenants in American law - abiding agreements meant to protect individuals and communities from the intrusions of government. They also have become, as many a family and community will attest, inadvertent impediments to the very safety they purport to secure.

Privacy, Liberty and Another Mass Murder

Privacy and Liberty. These have become covenants in American law - abiding agreements meant to protect individuals and communities from the intrusions of government. They also have become, as many a family and community will attest, inadvertent impediments to the very safety they purport to secure.

How to Start a Movement: A Movie Review of Chavez

"Si se puede!" Yes we can! Cesar Chavez asserts to a restive crowd of California migrant workers whose hope has worn too thin. Chavez has to keep their spirit and a movement alive that will deliver them from fear, child labor, inability to read and write, and the $2 a day in wages that are breeding another generation of shame, suffering, and early death.

Community Policing and Child Development

Cops and clinicians—and government—demonstrate (not just say) that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Back From the Brink

When you open the cover of this book you first see a copy of a handwritten suicide note, penned by the author. The PS reads “I just can’t be a burden any longer.”

More Than a Touch of Evil

While virtue may evoke admiration, evil excites. The Underwoods are like power porn. They flesh out our fantasies. They are a trip into the forbidden in us all.

How Do Actors Act?

We can witness success in theatre if just before the applause there is a moment of silence: that signifies that the actors and audience have touched one another, and want to go further. It is the endless trajectory of a mounting scale of “quality” that delivers the gratifying experience of a play well done or a life well lived.

Pope Francis and the Paradox of Faith

How might we seek, no less obtain, a faith in forces greater than ourselves in a post-modern world where the commercialization of just about everything, scientism (science as faith), and media and celebrity inundation barrage our thinking and values?

House of Cards: A Series Review

The second season of House of Cards has just been released. Not a weekly ration but the entire season up for continuous viewing on our varied wireless and cable devices—the only limits being the viewer's appetite for this dark, fatalistic (but bloodless) tale of power as well as any human need for sleep or to satisfy other natural functions.

The American Health Care Paradox: A Book Review

This crisp, clear and easily digestible book begins by first showing how the USA is at the top of 32 developed nations in its health care spending as a % of GDP (50% more or greater) yet largely sits in the cellar when it comes to life expectancy, maternal mortality, low birth weight and infant mortality.

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