Siobhan Ford
Zoltan Istvan speaking at University of Baltimore Bypassing Biology event -- Photo by Siobhan Ford
Source: Siobhan Ford

After 731 days, I finally finished my run for the US Presidency. Naturally, I didn't win, and I may not ever know exactly how many votes I received, since they were write-in votes. Probably not too much, since at the end, I encouraged my supporters to vote their conscience and to be practical--knowing I technically had no chance.

That said, I still voted for myself.

Zoltan Gyurko Istvan
I voted for myself!
Source: Zoltan Gyurko Istvan

First, regarding the 2016 Election, let me say: Congratulations Donald Trump on your victory. I hope your Presidency is successful. Also, my best wishes to Hillary Clinton and Gary Johnson, who both ran powerful campaigns that influenced many people.

I've pointed out in a number of interviews the last few weeks (Inverse via Mike Brown and Sunday Express via Sean Martin) I think Trump will be good for science. He must be aware that if China gains a lead in science and technology research in the next eight years--as is possible--China may lead the world into the transhumanist age. I think this is unacceptable for Americans, and I'm willing to bet Trump thinks that too. So I believe Trump will do what is necessary for American science and technology to thrive and lead the way.

Beyond that, I want to share some of the last month's happenings as I headed into the finale of the elections. It was by far the largest and most visible week of my 2-year campaign. A massive amount of press occurred. It began with a print feature in the "Talk of the Town" section in The New Yorker by Andrew Marantz.

The New Yorker
Source: The New Yorker

My  interview with editor Devindra Hardawar at Engadget also came out and was widely read. It was great to talk to Devindra at his office in New York City.

Rebecca Coulson of The Spectator interviewed me at my San Francisco home which resulted in one of the more fun and revealing stories of my campaign. She's a great writer.

Washington Post story also came out about ISideWith by Caitlin Dewey that also spoke of my campaign.

ISideWith.com
Source: ISideWith.com

Also, my Wired UK article titled Forget Trump and Clinton, Zoltan Istvan is Running for President as the 'Anti-Death' Candidate came out in print--which is one of the most complete opinion stories I did on my campaign. It's on newstands right now.

The day of and before the election I did back to back interviews with many radio stations. A notable one was with New Hampshire Public Radio's Word of Mouth which also appeared as a NPR podcast.

Additonally, I was grateful to have Richard Dawkin's Facebook page share one of my atheist articles on the eve of the election.

Even Breitbart via Nate Church featured some of my thoughts with Elon Musk in a tech story discussing Universal Basic Income, one of my main platforms.

Many international stories also came out--the biggest which was a Russia Today feature on my campaign via journalist Maria Buharova.

Richard Dawkins Facebook
Source: Richard Dawkins Facebook

Also, Politico via journalist Bill Mahoney did a story on New York state Write-in candidates where my campaign was the lead feature and image.

Many other stories came out, and I'm grateful transhumanism and longevity politics has been getting so much coverage.

On a final note, I also was at the University of Baltimore on October 19th at an event called Bypassing Biology. Along with artist Amy Karle and designer Ben Julian (two really fascinating people), I spoke about transhumanism to design students and the public. The event was organized by professor and designer Joseph Fioramonti, who put together a wonderful time for all.

Thank you to all my supporters who cheered me on as I made a run for the White House as a transhumanist.

Zoltan Istvan on The Rubin Report.

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