The 8th Annual National LGBT Health Awareness Week runs from March 28th to April 3rd, 2010. This year the theme of LGBT Health Awareness Week is Closing the Gap. According to the website of the National Coalition for LGBT Health, the LGBT community has, on average, worse health outcomes and less access to the care than the straight community. We cannot afford to ignore the gap anymore. We need to commit to closing the gap, because everyone deserves good health!

To help accomplish these goals, the National Coalition for LGBT Health has provided many resources. You can learn more about specific health issues relevant to the LGBT community, download and print out fact sheets, find events to attend and see ideas of simple ways individuals and organizations can get involved. Visit the awareness week website.

In honor of National LGBT Health Awareness Week, my research program's website will be posting a new research finding about LGBT health each day this week. You can visit our newly launched website for the IMPACT LGBT Health and Development Program. There you can finding videos with interviews about LGBT health and development, research findings, and links to resources.

The Sexual Continuum Blog now has a facebook page. To become a fan of the blog, click here and then choose to "become a fan." By joining you will get updates as new blog posting come out.

Recent Posts in The Sexual Continuum

What Does It Mean to Be “Mostly Heterosexual?”

A new article reviews what we know about people who are "mostly heterosexual."

New Study of Gay/Bisexual Adolescent Men and Their Parents

A new study investigates relationships between gay teens and their parents.

New Brain Study Questions Existence of “Sexual Addiction"

A new study showed the brain's response to pornography is different than drugs

Leading “Ex Gay” Organization Closes

President of "ex gay" organization apologizes for harm to LGBT community

Are Violent Hate Crimes Against LGBT People on the Rise?

Examining the data to see if anti-LGBT hate crimes are on the rise.

Why Do Young Gay Men Try to Be the Best?

A new study tests the "best little boy in the word" hypothesis.